Chapter 11

Wall Family

The Wall family is connected to the Covington family through the marriage of Nancy Wall to John Covington [See discussion of this confusing "fact" in the Covington family history, Chapter 10] on 26 July 1770. as his second wife. The Covington family is then connected to the Gathings family [Chapter 9] through the marriage of Martha Wall Covington to James J. Gathings on 5 April 1838. Their daughters, Mattie (Martha Wall Texanna) and Emma Davis Gathings, both married James McCown [Chapters 1-8].

 NOTE TO THE READER: The following Wall family lineage is purely speculation! There is no doubt in my mind that we are descended from the Wall family of southern Virginia. Our problem is just how we are descended. Almost every Covington family author asserts that John Covington [Chapter 10] of Richmond County, North Carolina, married Nancy Wall, and it is from her that we are descended. Many of the ensuing generations of the Covingtons used "Wall" and "Poythress" (a Wall family maternal branch) as middle names. We know from the Covington family history that Nancy Wall had at least two brothers in North Carolina: John and William Wall. John Covington married Nancy Wall on 26 July 1770, and she bore him nine children over the next dozen or so years, probably indicating that she could have been born between about 1740 and 1750. Her brothers were supposedly born in 1742 and 1746. From this sparse information, we can deduce that her parents were married about 1740, and further deduce that they were born between about 1710 and 1720.

  One source has asserted that Nancy’s father and mother were John Wall of Brunswick County, Virginia and Ann Poythress, and that they moved from Virginia to Anson County, North Carolina, about 1750. So far I have found no records in Anson or Richmond County, North Carolina, referring to the senior John Wall.

  Others have tried to deal with this dilemma before me. No one has yet been able to prove the exact Wall lineage, nor have they been able to prove the Poythress connection. The following excerpts from an earlier author’s attempts show the dilemma as well as providing us with some useful information and circumstantial evidence.

˜²™

"The only know reference to the specific county from which John Wall I came is in excerpts from two letters written in 1926 by Mial Wall of Herando, Mississippi. In a letter of 13 March 1926, he said:

"’My great grandfather John Wall and his brother William, according to my records, were the sons of John Wall and were both born in what is now Greensville County, Va., then Prince George County, and removed from there with their father to Anson County (now Richmond County), North Carolina, somewhere between 1745 and 1760. The original Wall in America, again according to my record, was John Wall, who owned a plantation at Weyanoke, on the Southside of the James River, then known as Charles City County, in 1639.’

"On 24 March 1926 he wrote:

"’My great-great grandfather John Wall Sr. removed from Greensville County, Va., about the yr. 1745 and settled on the banks of the Pee Dee river about 4 miles from the town of Rockingham, N.C. … acquired large tracts of land there, and beyond a record of frequent visits by him, and my great-grandfather John Wall Jr. To Virginia relatives I have no data as to the further history of the Va. Family. We still have a host of relatives living in and around Rockingham and Wadesboro, N.C. and I visited there last spring.

"All attempts to validate the story that John Wall I’s [this is referring to the son of the John Wall who moved from Virginia to North Carolina] mother was Ann Poythress have failed. However, the persistence of that name through successive generations of the Wall family lends some support to the legend of a Wall-Poythress connection. Since some of the Poythresses are reputed to be direct descendants of Pocahontas it seems reasonable to assume that it might be through that line that the Walls claim their connection with the famed Indian maiden. Walter Ashe Wall came across an item in an 1800 newspaper that may not have significance in this regard but it is amusing.

"’A descendant of the Princess Pocahunta is now living in this state, the descendant of Mr. John Wall, a comedian who married into the royal Indian family. Mr. Wall often gives as a reason why he pursues the life of an itenerant Player, that the number of Visitants, whom curiosity drew to see his wife, put him to a greater expence than his finances could support. The present young Princess performed on the stage in Edenton about two years ago, under the name of Miss Pocahunta Wall!

[Comment: This is the stuff of legends! The only connection the Wall family has to Pocahontas is through marriage, if, indeed, even this is true — see Chapter 12. No Poythress can claim to be descended from Pocahontas!]

"Probably of greater significance is correspondence that Walter Ashe Wall had in 1953 with Mr. Richard Dunn of Richmond, Virginia. Mr. Dunn wrote:

"’From 1725 to 1949 Joshua Poythress I and his descendants owned the Flower de Hundred plantation in Prince George County, Virginia. On 18 July 1952, I gave to the Archives Division, Virginia State Library, a copy of the will, dated 17 January 1739, of Joshua Poythress I of Flower de Hundred which I had found among the papers of my late father, Dr. William Wilcox Dunn (1870-1952) who was the last descendant of Joshua Poythress to own Flower de Hundred.

"’From your viewpoint, the interesting thing about the copy of the Will of Joshua Poythress I is that it was introduced as evidence in the suit of Wall against Poythress as is clearly shown by the following wording which was inscribed on the back of the will:

"’Will (copy) of Joshua Poythress Wall vs. Poythress’…

"Also following excerpt from the will of Joshua Poythress I establishes the fact that as of 17 January 1739 he had an unmarried daughter named Ann Poythress — ‘the remainder of my estate I give and devise to my loving wife and to my sons Joshua Poythress and William Poythress and to my daughters Ann Poythress, Elizabeth Poythress and Mary Poythress to be equally divided between them when my son Joshua Poythress shall come to age.’

"’From the above, it would seem to me that Ann Poythress, daughter of Joshua Poythress I of Flower de Hundred, married John Wall after the death of her father and being dissatisfied with the division of her father’s estate brought suit against his executors.’"

–w—

  If all our speculations are true, then our task is to find a John Wall of Brunswick County, who married an Ann Poythress about 1740, and who was born between 1700 and 1720. The fact that I have found such a pair, as documented below, does not prove a thing! But it is the best information that we have at this time, and we will continue to research this hypothesized lineage until time and resources prove or disprove our theory.

 Analysis of possible Wall ancestors:

In the beginning of this research, Henry Wall, of Prince George County, Virginia, seemed a likely candidate to have been the first Wall in our lineage. We find several references to him in the Bristol Parish records: 

[Comment: Henry was probably the son of an even earlier John Wall of Charles City County:

"Francis Grey, 750 acs. Chas. City Co., 24 Nov. 1653. Being a middle around bet. the heads of Mr. Sparrow, Jon. Wall & Jon. Hackers land bounding S.E. on land of Mr. Sparrow, E. on the head of John Hacker & N. E. on Marke Averies land, N. on land of Joseph Johnson, and N.W. on the head of John Wall’s land. 300 acs. by bill of sale from John Wall. 4 Jan 1649; & 450 acs. by order of the Govr. & Councell 24 Nov 1653 as alsoe for trans. of 9 pers: Grace Singleton, Fra. Loveday, Robt. Lawrence, Ant. Allen, Mary Cesar, Morrice Sinckler, Tho. Southern."]

 "Henry Wall, 275 Acres, Bristoll Pish., Chas. City Co., and (bounded) at or near Rahowick, at a certain hickory corner tree of the lands now or late of Maj. Chamberlin, thence E. … crossing a run or branch … one of the lines late of Col. Wood now or late of Maj. Chamberlin, thence along the line of marked trees S.W. … The sd. Land was due by Trans. Of 6 psons., 21 April 1690. Harry, Sambo, Ruth, Tom, Moll, Ned, Negroes."

 [Comment: Prince George County was created from Charles City County in 1702, so this land was originally in Charles City County, but became part of the new Prince George County when the latter was created. Most of Bristol Parish later fell into Dinwiddie County when it was created.]

 "Nicholas Overbee the Younger, 323 Acres, Bristoll Pish., Chas. City Co., at ir bear Rahowick. Bounded: at a corner of the lands late of Col Wood which also is a corner of the lands late of Abraham Jones, and thence along the sd. Jones marked line E. … to a pine by the side of a run of the lines of Henry Wall, crossing that Br., then along that line E. … where it falls upon one of the lines of the land late of Col. Wood aforesd, then along that line N.E. … The sd. Land was due by Trans. of 7 psons., 21 April 1690."

 "Nich: Overbey, 365 Acs., C. C. Co., Bristol Parish, beg. At the black oake side line to the sd. Overbeys land being a tract of 323 acres formerly taken up & Patented by him, the sd. Line being a W. 27 deg. S. line 89 pl. and runs then S. 15 deg. W. 104 po. to a pine by a slash called the round ponds, thence S. 50 deg. W. 60 po. to a Western Wading Path at a red oake near the upper side thereof, then 24 deg. W. 166 po. to 2 black oakes and a pine at the head of a Br. on a point then 64 deg. W. 109 po. to Ralph Jackson’s line at a small red oake, thence along the sd. Jacksons line W. 32 deg. E. 120 po. to a scrubbed black oake, thence N. 104 po. to a gum in a Br. of Rohoick in the line of Mr. Rich’d Jones, thence along the sd. Jones line E. 1 Deg. ¼ N. 82 po. to the sd. Jones corner ash S. along red oakes and a pine by the head of a Br. of Rohoick, thence along the sd. Jones line N. 10 deg. ¾ E. 17 po. to hickory corner tree to the sd. Jones and henry Wall, then along the sd. Walls land N. 29 deg. ¾ E. 17 po. to a small red oake corner of the sd Walls at or near the Main Br. of Rohoick on a hill side, then along the sd. Walls Land E. 13 deg. ¾ N. 13 po. to the Main Br. of Rohoick, then up the Main Br. of Rohoick along the sd. Overbeys old land S. by E. 116 po. to a pine, thence along the sd. Overbey’s old land E. 27 deg. N. 96 po. to the 1st mentioned beginning. The Land was due Nich. Overbey for Trans. of 7 psons (not named), 26 April 1698."

 "Mr. Richard Jones, 230 Acs., C. C. Co., Parish of Bristoll S. S. [south side] of Appomattox Riv., vizt., bet. a corner pohickory belong to the Land of Henry Wall & runs thence S. by W. 64 po. to a corner pine, thence W. 153 po. to a corner pine, thence N. W. & by N. ½ W. 26 po. to a corner black oake, thence W. & by N. ½ N. Lat. (?) po. and N. by W. ¼ W. 39 po. to a corner pohickory, thence W. N. W. 121 po. to a corner black oake, thence N. & by W. ½ W. 30 po. to a corner white oake standing on the Western B. of Rohowicke, thence down that Br. as it trends to the mouth thereof, and thence on that Line S. E. ¾ E. 156 po. to corner pohickory, thence on the Line of Henry Wall E. & by S. ½ S. 182 po. to the place it began. The Land was due for Trans. of 5 psons (not named), 15 October 1698." 

Thus we learn from the above deeds that Henry Wall was living in Bristol Parish as early as 1690, that his neighbors were Nicholas Overby, Ralph Jackson, and Richard Jones, and that his land was somewhere on a Rohoick or Rohowicke branch, creek, or swamp (which is no longer so named on a detailed Virginia gazetteer) but was south of the Appomattox River. Since the Appomattox River runs through the present city of Petersburg, we can deduce that Henry Wall lived somewhere in this vicinity.

  Henry Wall died in 1710 as evidenced by the following records that pertain to the settlement of his estate. 

"Inventory of estate of Henry Wall, dec’d, taken 8 Dec. 1710 (2 pages) Value £92/11/8, by James Thweatt, Nich’o Overby, & Sam (S) Harwell. Sworn before Me, Peter Jones. Recorded 9 Jan. 1710, being presented by Adm’x of dec’d" 

"8 July 1712, Elizabeth Wall, relict and Adm’x of Henry Wall, dec’d, returned this account. List money due to Capt. Bolling, Mrs. Elizabeth Kanaan, Mr. Henry Anderson, Capt. Robert Bolling, Mr. George Roberson, to total of £23/9/2. More debts due: Charles Roberts, Samuell Harrowell, Docter Bowman, ‘my son John’." 

Thus, from the above records, we know that Henry Wall’s wife was named Elizabeth, and that they were the parents of at least one son: John Wall. For the widow to have officially owed her son, we can deduce that this John Wall was probably already an adult in 1712. 

From the following record we know as well that Henry Wall was also the father of a William Wall, and that this William Wall was in Brunswick County in 1727: 

"12 June 1727. William Wall of Brunswick Co. to Robert Bolling of Pr. Geo. Co., land on south side of Rohowick Swamp in Pr. Geo. 125 acres, being part of a patent of 275 acres granted to Henry Wall and devised by him to said William Wall by his will.

Wit: Buller Herbert

Thomas Epes William (X) Wall

William Watson

Recorded 13 June 1727. Ann, wife of William Wall, relinq. dower rt." 

Now we are faced with a dilemma. From the above estate records of Henry Wall, we know that he had a son, John Wall. But, as will soon be shown, we have an embarrassing abundance of John Walls. In 1715, we find a John Wall being granted a patent for land.

 

"31 Oct 1715. John Wall, on S. side of Nottoway River, on both sides of Waquiyough Creek. 185 acres." 

Then, in 1717, we find the will of a John Wall: 

"Will of John Wall of Parish of Westover, Pr. Geo. Co.

"To son John Wall, my plantation and land on which I now dwell after my wife’s decease.

"To son Michael Wall plantation on the Maaron [Meherrin] River, 100 acres, in Alley Whight [Isle of Wight] County, son to pay what remains to be paid on land.

"Wife Sarah to be exec.

"July 25, 1717

"John Livesay John (X) Wall

"John (X) Cleton

"Philip Claud

"Probated 8 Oct 1717." 

Was John Wall of the 1715 patent the same John Wall whose will was dated 1717? And were these both the same John Wall who was the son of Henry Wall? Or did the original John Wall (who sold land in 1653) have sons John and Henry (more likely)? Is the John Wall in the patent of 1715 the same John Wall whose will was dated in 1717? Note that both Henry Wall and John Wall (will, 1717) had sons named John Wall! My guess, after putting all the information together below, was that the John Wall of the 1715 patent was the son of the John Wall of the 1717 will, and that this patent was, in fact, his inducement to move further south into what was to become, some years later, Brunswick County, and still later, Greensville County.

  Of course we started this analysis with the theory that John Wall married an Ann Poythress. We could, perhaps, identify our John Wall if we could positively correlate him with Ann Poythress. Nothing is ever easy in genealogy! It turns out in analyzing the Poythress family [Chapter 12], we have two candidates for Ann Poythress. But one is a far better candidate than the other based upon a coincidence. In the Poythress family history, we find both a John and Joshua Poythress, cousins, who had unmarried daughters at the time they filed their wills. Though both cousins filed their wills in Martins Brandon Parish, Prince George County, we know from the land records that Joshua Poythress’s brother, at least, owned land on "Walls run, bounded by sd. Run, and lands of Sarah Wall." Of course, John Wall died in 1717, leaving his wife, Sarah, as his executrix, as proved above. This last bit of information provides us with one very important correlating fact: Ann Poythress, daughter of Joshua Poythress, was in the same proximity of John Wall, son of John (died 1717). In the Poythress family history [Chapter 12] we provide other circumstantial evidence that suggests these two lived in the vicinity of each other. 

Another piece of circumstantial information that indicates we are descended from John Wall (will 1717) is the fact that he had a son named Michael. As will be shown below, Michael Wall was a contemporary and apparently close acquaintance of Colonel John Wall of Brunswick County, as indicated by the many court records where their names appear together.

So, for now, we will dispense with Henry Wall who was probably a relative of the Walls of our lineage (probably a brother of the John Wall who left a will in 1717), and build our hypothesized lineage from the John Wall who was married to Sarah, and died circa 1717 in Prince George County, Virginia. And having established our hypothetical lineage from the John Wall who died in 1717, we can extend our lineage even further back to what was probably the original John Wall, his father, who appeared in the Charles City County (south side of the James, in what was to become Prince George County) records in the mid-1600’s. 

he original John Wall, presumed to be in our lineage, first appeared in the patent books in 1643 with a very large grant of land that was later located in two counties: Surry and Prince George.

 

"23 Aug 1643. John Wall 1,791 acres on Upper Chippokes Creek between lands of John Hacker and William Pilkington. This land extended west to Ward’s Creek in Prince George County, and 300 acres of it were acquired by Wall on 20 Sep 1629, 1,200 by purchase from Rice Hoe [Book 1], and 291 acres were new this date. The Wall family later came into Surry County." 

[Comment: As the above implies, John Wall may have been in Virginia as early as 1629. The purchase of 1,200 acres from Rice Hoe probably indicates that he was a relatively wealthy man. The comment that "the Wall family later came into Surry County, is borne out by the presence of a Wall clan in Surry in later records — see below, and indicates that this clan was related to our line. Joseph Wall seems to have been the patriarch of this Surry clan. He may have been the son of John Wall, since — see below — we know that John Wall had a son named Joseph.] 

John Wall’s next appearance was in the Charles City County court records in 1655. Most of the Charles City County records were burned in the Civil War, and only the county court orders survived for the period in which we are interested. Unsatisfactory as it might be, we will have to content ourselves with the fragmentary glimpses into the life of this, our Wall progenitor, from these surviving records. (All records where he appears were recorded at the court on the south side of the James, in the area that later became Prince George County.) 

"Itt is ordered that 20 lb tobbo per poll be forthw’th levied by distress if needful by the sherriffe on the tytheable persons of this Com and p’d as followeth … Ca Wall for 1 wolve … 200 lb tobbo" 

"Abstract. Walter Saleter confesses Judgt. To Capt. Jo. Wall for 450 lb tobo" 

"Abstract. Capt John Wall chosen guardian of Robt. Herdman and his estate, which he is to receive from Austin Willyard." 

"Att a Cort holden att Westov’r Octobr: 27. 1656 … Ordered that 26 lb tobbo per poll be forthwth Levied and Collected by the present sherr on every person in this Com being 516 and paid as foll vidz … Capt Wall … 1 wolfe … 200 lb tobbo" 

"Whereas Capt John Wall standeth indebted to mr Tho: Drewe as per severall specialties app’th 1834 lb of picked and culled tobbo and cask and 1300 lb of good merchtble tobbo and cask payable att fflower de hundred, and 8 £ 16 s. 7 d sterl money and one case conteyning three gallons of good wine. It is therefore ordered that the sd Wall make present paym’t of all the premisses to the sd Mr Drewe or his asgs w’th interest for the sd 1300 lb tobbo and cask and costs als execuc." 

"Abstract. Attach. Granted Capt John Wall agt. est. of Peter Salmon, for certain tobo., half to be paid Mr. Wyatt." 

"Abstract. Exec. Granted Capt. Jno. Wall agst certain est. of Peter Salmon at his suit for 8000 lb. tobo." 

"Abstract. Moris Rose ordered to dispose of the est. of Wm Wheeler, dec’d., and give a/c to the Court. Nichol: Perry and Capt. Jno. Wall to make appraisal." 

"Abstract. Attachmt granted Capt. Jno. Wall agt est. of Capt Wm Odeon for 1 hhd tobo." 

"Capt John Wall, mr David Jones, mr fferd: Aston and mr ffrancis Redford are required and appointed to apprise the estate of mr John Gibbs dec’d on the 10th of this instant month." 

"[1659] Abstract. Phillip Ellyott, for himself and Wm Ranger, conf. Judgt. to Capt John Wall for 800 lb. tobo." 

"Abstract. Judgt granted Capt Jno Wall agst est of Capt Wm Odeon for 349 lb tobo and 3 yrs interest." 

"[4 June 1660] Abstract. The sherr ord to seize the estate of Phillip Ellyott, pay Capt Jno Wall and release the person of Ellyott." 

"Abstract. Deed of Gift. 3 Oct. 1660. John Wall ‘unto his sonne in Law Charles Clay’ 2 ewes."

"Abstract. Dif betw Capt Jno Wall plt and Phillip Ellyot deft to next Court."

 [12 Jul 1661] "…Itt is further ordered that the like muster be made by the sayd Major Harris w’th the assistance of Capt ffrancis Grey of all the freemen Inhabitants from Powells Creeke on the South side, And from Oldmans Creeke on the North side to the lower extent of the Com upon the 5th of August next att fflowiday hundred [Flowerdew Hundred], and that lists and accots be taken and returned as abovesd: That mr John Holmwood and mr Stephen Hamelin having timely notice from the sd Major Harris give their attendance att the sd muster and tender and administer the oaths of allegance and Supremacie to the sd Inhabitants and imprison by their power in the sherr’ custody all persons refuseing the same.

"That an 8th part of the sd Inhabitants be selected and listed for a trayned band, with addicon of horse as aforesd, and provided as before directed to report upon occasion of allarmes to Moris Rose his plantacon on the head of Wards Creeke, there to be comanded by Capt John Wall on the Capts of the guard of the Counties…" 

[Comment: The above muster was undoubtedly the occasion of another Indian scare on the frontier, of which there were many in those years. It is informative, however, that Captain John Wall was, indeed, one of the regular militiamen who apparently had military training.] 

"Whereas Wm Av’et (Averet) hath furiously and violently assaulted and maymed Moris Rose whereby his Mat’s peace is infringed and a subject disabled The Co’rt doth therefore ord’r and adjudge that the sd Av’ett pay the fine and penalty of two thousand pounds of good tobbo and caske to his Ma’ts use for the breach of the law and peace, and rest in the sherriffs custody untill he enter into Recognizance w’th good security for his future good abearing.

The Jury Inter Rose plt and Av’et defend’te

Capt ffrancis Grey foreman mr Wm Edwards

mr James Crowes mr James Ward

mr Richd Taylor mr Rice Hoe [Book 1]

mr Patrick Jackson mr John Smith

mr Morgan Jones mr Edd Richards

Capt John Wall mr. James Parham

"Whereas it doth plainely appe’ unto us by the appereance of Moris Rose that he hath lost his teeth therefore we do find for the plt 3000 lb of tobbo." 

[Comment: Amazing! Moris Rose was assaulted and lost his teeth, and the Court initially orders that the assailant pay his Majesty the damages!? Under this system it would be to the advantage of the Crown to get all its loyal subjects to fighting among themselves and every time one complained, to assess a fine which is kept by the Crown. I hope our present representatives in Washington don’t hear of this scheme for raising taxes! The jury raised the ante to 3000 lbs. of tobacco. I wonder if they intended that it should go to Moris Rose or to the king.]

 "Att a meeting held at Westov’r Jan’ry the 4th 1661

by the sev’rall vestryes of Cha: Citty Com.

"Itt is agreed and concluded amongst the sev’all vestryes of Charles Citty Com that they will entertaine in their sev’rall precincts one minister for this ensuing yeare, and willingly allow him 20 lb of tobbo per head, collected, with caske: And this is agreed and consented to by the unanimous consent of the whole Com in reference to the knowne Lawes of his Ma’tie and our Duties in point of Church Gov’rnment, to wch we have subscribed our hands the Day and yeare above written.

Edw Hill James x Ward

Thomas Drewe John Cogan [Book 1, Part 2]

Anthony Wyatt John Wall

Robert Wynne Will’ Bird

John Holmwood ffer: Aston

Israill Dennes John Drayton

Otho Southcott" 

[Comment: The above record is important because it establishes the fact that this John Wall was a vestryman of Westover Parish. But note that the "Capt." appellation is missing! In all other records, the John Wall we have been following is referred to as "Captain John Wall." This may mean that the above reference is to Captain John Wall’s son, John. The other names on this list reads like a Who’s-Who of colonial Virginia. John Wall was among the elite, the movers-and-shakers, of that section of Virginia.] 

[1662] "John Monke aged about 35 yeares exaed and sworne sayth That the last voyage the depon’t was in the Country he was at the house of Cap’t John Wall and there saw an Indian woman (a serv’t to that family) whom they named Elizabeth strike at Mrs. Wall and further cannot depose." 

"Abstract. Dif betw Capt John Wall and Moris Rose concerning a barrel of sugar to next Court. Capt Robt Wynne to examine Mr Eusebius King concerning the premisses." 

"Henry Tame aged about 30 yeares exa’d and sworne sayth That being at Capt Jno Walls house a yeare since the depon’t saw a kinde of contest betweene Mrs Wall and an Indian woman called Elizabeth then a serv’t to the sd Wall and discerned the sd Elizabeth to bee soe violent as to bite the sd Mrs. Wall by the Breast and at another time the sd Tame pre’nt did see the sd Elizabeth w’th much violence endave’r to thrust the head of the sd Mrs Wall into the Oven then red hott and ready for bread to be sett therein and further sayth not." 

"Whereas Elizabeth Christana serv’t to Capt Jno: Wall hath violently and disobediently resisted and assaulted her M’rs with blows and bitings as by testimony produced appereth Itt is therefore ordered that the sd Elizabeth shall for her insolent resistance and opposicon serve her M’r and M’rs according to act in that case provided." 

"Presentments of Grand Jury of Charles City Co.

    1. Walter Haines for making seconds declared by Mr Cornelius one of the jury.
    2. Richd Smith and Joane his wife ‘for fornication before marriage’ on evidence of Capt John Wall one of the jury.
    3. Roger Womsley and - (left blank) - his wife for absenting themselves from public worship for 9 mos. On information of Robert Nicholson sworne before Mr Jno Holmwood and affirned by Lt fferd: Aston and Mr Peter Plumer

Otho Southcott Peter Plumer

John Wall George Potter

Tho Holford Cornelius Clemance

John Drayton Edward Ardington

James Blamore ffer: Aston

John x Sturdevant John Stith

Rec. 25 April 1663" 

[Comment: Please note that in the above record, as well as that naming his as a vestryman, the reference was to John Wall — without the "Capt" title. In every other record, he was referred to as "Captain." Do these records, then, refer to the same John Wall, or do they refer to his son?] 

"Abstract. Deed of Lease. 3 April 1663. Capt Francis Grey of Martins Brandon, Gent., leases to Tho: Mudgett of the same place, 100 acres, part of a div seated by the sd Grey, adj land of Capt Jno Wall and land of sd Grey, for 21 years. ‘And if the said Tho: Mudgett shall have issue Male or female by his now wife the daughter of the said Capt ffrancis Grey’ then the land to become Mudgett’s in fee simple." 

"Capt John Wall and Mr Elias Osborne having made information to the Co’rt that Mrs Jane Rollinson hath confessed to have murthered a child of her family are hereby required and Com’anded to prosecute the sd Jane Rollinson according to Law for the sd offence." 

[Comment: It must have been about this time that Capt. John Wall died. (The date on the very next record is 20 Aug 1663.) Note that though he was charged with prosecuting Mrs. Jane Rollinson, he is not named again in the following set of records that dealt with the case. A few pages later in the records, shown below, and dated 4 Feb 1664/5, Elizabeth Wall probated his will.] 

"A List of a Jury sworne to Inquire of the death of a Child Drowned the 30th of 7 ber 1663 at Mr Wm Rollinsons

Mr John Tatem foreman

Mr Walter Holdsworth [Book 1, Part 1] Mr. Edward Beck

Mr Ellias Osborne Mr Theophilus Beddenfield

Mr Augustine Williard Mr Tho: Stone

Mr Joseph Osborne Mr John Hix

Mr Richd Price Mr George Marshall

Mr Ben: Wade

"Wee the above menconed Jury doe not finde any wayes but that this child came accidently by its death by Examining the family and causing them to touch the Corps we finde no other wayes.

"Resolved by the Co’rt by their unaminous opinion that the children of Mr Cha: Sparrow decd be not exposed to the danger of their Mother who is accused of a murther of a negro child of her family.

"The Co’rt doth hereby continue the trust of Lt Wm Rollinson to manage the estate of the Orphanes of Mr Cha: Sparrow decd and their sec’ll educacons till their full Age by Law provided that they be not kept at his house, by reason of danger of their Mothers Lunatick Violence and that the sd Rollinson continue Security from time to time for due performance of his sd trust." 

["Note: Touching a Dead Body: It was an ancient superstition that the body of a murdered person would bleed freely when touched by the murderer. Hence in old criminal law, this was resorted to as a means of ascertaining the guilt or innocence of a person suspected of murder. - B.F"]

 

[4 Feb 1664/5] "Abstract. Prob of will of Capt Jno Wall dec’d to Elizabeth Wall the relict. Will proved by oaths of Capt Fran: Grey & Richard Price." 

"Abstract. Nonsuits as foll: Elizabeth Wall agt Jno Rouse. Samuel Phillips agt Freeguift Throckmorton. Danl Llewellyn agt Richard Nance. Curtis Laud (or Land) agt Jno Rouse, two entries." 

"Abstract. Dif betw Mrs Elizabeth Wall plt and Francis Trehan deft to next Court." 

"Abstract. On petition of Joseph Wall for division of his father’s estate and his portion, according to his father’s will, the Court orders that 3 or 4 person of Martins Brandon, selected by sd Joseph Wall and Mrs Elizabeth Wall widow settle the estate. In case of diff Lt Coll Tho Drew to reconcile the premisses." 

[3 Feb 1665/6] Abstracts. Judgts to following: George Farley for John Johnson agst Jno Jacob for 390 lb tobo. To Mrs Agnes Hamelin admrx of Steph: Hamelin decd agst Antho: Wyatt for 3000 lb tobl. To Welthan Taylour agst Daniell Nunneley for certain clothes according to custom for her service and 140 lb tobo for her corn to be pd ‘at the arrivall of Ships.’ To Richd Mosby agst Andrew Meldram for 13.s 6.d Sterl money due on demand. To Howell Pryse 600 lb tobo for fees agt Jno Tate who m the relict of Capt Jno Wall." 

"Samuell Amyes aged twenty six yeares or thereabouts sworne and exa’ied before me the 3d day of Febry. 1665.

"Saith that Mr. Jno Cogan [Book 1, Part 2] came to the house of Mrs Wall to gett a passage over the Creeke. Mrs Wall being at that time sick, the sd Cogan desired Mrs Wall that she would take some medicene of him, and in case she did recover if she would give him anything for his meanes she might and if she would not he would no demand anything, and at the same time the sd Cogan had severall medicines delivered to him by Mrs Walls order the particulars whereof the sd Mrs Wall hath and furhter your depon’t saith not." 

From the above records we can deduce that Captain John Wall was married to Elizabeth ____,. Probably as his second wife, since she remarried and appears to have been considerably younger than him. Captain John Wall died about August 1663, and his widow remarried, by 3 Feb 1666, to John Tate. The above records prove that John Wall had a daughter who married Charles Clay before 1660, and that he had a son named Joseph. Unfortunately, they do not directly prove that he also had a son named John. The fact that there are two records that refer to John Wall, without the title "Captain," is circumstantial evidence that he also had a son named John (and who else would the John Wall, below, be the son of?).

  From the following record, we learn that John Wall was the father of a daughter who married a Price: 

"Deed 26 Jan 1693. John Price of Martins Brandon Parish, Charles City Co., planter, and Jane his wife, to George Blighton of same, Gent., for exchange of a certain plantation in same parish, lately exchanged by said Blighton with said Price, and also for 4000 lbs tobacco paid to said John, 800 acres, part of 1360 acres purchased by John Wall, grandfather of said John Price, from Rice Hoe, dec’d, and bounded by James River, near mouth of Wards Creek, by Richard Newman’s land purchased of Joseph Wall, dec’d and by Matthew Mark’s line. Wit: Tho. Hamelin, Tho. Wilkins. Signed: John (P) Price, Jane (I) Price. Recorded 5 Feb 1693."

  From the above, we deduce, then, that Captain John Wall was the father of at least two sons and two daughters. 

  1. John Wall, b. ca. 1640, d. 1717, m. Sarah _____
  2. Joseph Wall; d. before 3 Oct 1693; m. Elizabeth _____

"Will of Joseph Wall of Martins Brandon proved by oath of Peter Good and Thomas Goodwin, and probate granted to Elizabeth, the relict and executrix."

[Comment: See below. Thomas Goodwin seems to be very closely related to the Wall family. His name keeps appearing in records pertaining to them, and to the Poythress family.]

3. (daughter); m. Charles Clay before 1660

[Comment: The daughter of John Wall must have died soon after their marriage, because at the time of Charles Clay’s death 1686, he was married to Hannah Wilson, daughter of John Wilson, who married secondly, Edward Stanley of Henrico County. The daughter of Edward and Hannah Wilson Clay Stanley was Hannah, who married Henry Thweatt — see Book 2. Charles Clay was one of the followers of Nathaniel Bacon in Bacon’s Rebellion in 1676. It would be interesting to know if John Wall shared political preferences with his son-in-law.]

4. (daughter); m. _____ Price 

John Wall of Westover Parish of Prince George County, Virginia, was the next member of our lineage of whom we are reasonably certain. He was married to Sarah (last name unknown). 

[Comment: See the Prince George County history in Appendix 3. Westover Parish in 1717 included areas on either side of the James River. The fact that the will was annotated as being made in Prince George County means that John Wall lived in the south part of the parish. Furthermore, we have reason to believe that the John Wall family lived on, or in the vicinity of, Walls Creek, and that the creek was probably named for his father.] 

Like his presumed father before him, the only records we have naming this John Wall are the fragmentary bits of information contained in the Charles City County Court Orders. He lived on the south side of the James River, in what was to become Prince George County in 1702. Since the early Prince George County records have, if anything, been more completely destroyed than those of Charles City, we have only the brief period before 1702 in which to find any information. The few records where he was mentioned are the following. 

"Judgement granted John Wall agst estate of Elizabeth Wallis for 400 lbs tobacco." 

[Comment: The entry immediately preceding the one above as "Judgement granted John Hardyman agst William Epes, Adm’r of Elizabeth Wallis, dec’d, for 681 lbs tobacco." What an interesting group of names — Hardyman [Chapter 13], Epes [Chapter 14], and Wall! Were these three families connected in other ways, and before, our documented lineage herein?] 

[Westover, 3 Oct 1692] "William Wilkins petitions to erect a mill on his land beside a run in this county. John Wall and Sarah his wife own land on the other side and refuse to let him have an acre. George Pace and Michael Rosser to value an acre of said land." 

[Comment: See the similar court cases involving the son of John and Sarah Wall, when he was attempting to build a mill in Brunswick County. It would seem that in the early days of the colony, building a mill was seen as a public service, and land for the mill was often obtained by condemning the land of the owner who as often as not, objected to the obtrusion.] 

"13 April 1693, the following recorded their livestock earmarks: John Dowglas, Benjamin Foster, John Lee, Edward Holway, Franc. Ledbetter, George Hughes, John Jolly, William Gary, John Danyel, John Wall, Wm Rany, John Fountain, John Hoder, Joseph Maddox, J. Maddox, Alex’r Davison, James Minge, Thomas Anderson, James Anderson, Thomas Wynn, Robert Wynn, John Hill, Will Tomson, James Smith, Wm Temple, Tho. Cureton, Sr., and Tho. Cureton, Jr. Recorded 5 June 1693: John Barlow and Samuell Tatem." 

[3 Jan 1697] "William Wilkins, deft., returned by Sherr. non est inventus, in action of trespass, 20,000 lbs tobacco damages agst him by John Wall and Sarah his wife, and attachment granted plt. Agst deft." 

["At a Court Holden at Westover 3rd February 1692"] William Wilkins appears to answer suit of John Wall and Sarah his wife. Action agst estate of Wilkins for 20,000 lbs tob. Damages is thereby replevyed. John Wall and Sarah his wife compl agst William Wilkins that Sarah hath a good right and title in 220 acres land in this county, into part of which the deft. With forces and arms unlawfully entered and divers trespasses comitted, felling divers tress, about 10th Nov. last, and since Wilkins appears and pleads not guilty. Court orders 12 men to come upon the lands in controversy and try case, and do this on 17th Instant or next fair day. James Minge, Surveyor, to attend also." 

[Comment: The above is a most interesting record! It would appear that Sarah Wall was the owner of a piece of property in her own right, and this property could have been (probably was) an inheritance. If we only had a description of the property we might be able to determine the name of the person who willed it to her. Is it possible that William Wilkins was a brother? Did his trespass have anything to do with a family squabble over inheritances? The Colonies went through periodically wild swings in inflation of the economy, but whatever his offense, 20,000 lb of tobacco seems to be an unusually high fine for trespass.] 

[4 Feb 1694] "Ordered that Henry Wych and John Wall view a tobacco house built by John King for Edward Chilton and report how they find it at next court." 

[4 Mar 1694] "Order of last court for Henry Wych and John Wall to view a house built by Henry King for Edward Chilton is recorded." 

[3 Jun 1695] "Case of Henry Hartwell, Esq., assignee of Edward Chilton, agst Stephen Cock, debt, 500 lbs tobacco, comes to trial. Jurors: Thomas Hamlin, John Hunt, Richard Cock, Jeffery Cumins, Thomas Parham, John Wall, Robert Hathorn, Tho: Linthorn, John Harris, Benj: Foster, John Mackeny. Jury finds for plt." 

[3 Jun 1695] "In case of John Lett agst John Bonner, plt. Claims deft. Used, burnt and killed plt’s horse. Deft. & Plt. put selves on the county and jury is impanelled: Thomas Hamlin, Edward Gross, Richard Cock, Jeffery Cumins, Tho: Parham, John Wall, …." 

[5 Aug 1695] "Henry Wych and John Wall, assigned by Justices to value the building built for Edward Chilton by Henry King, return a value of 600 lbs tobacco. Charles Goodrich, attorney for Edward Chilton confesses judgement to Henry King for 600 lbs tobacco." 

[5 Aug 1695] "Henry Wych and John Wall each have order for 30 lbs tob. agst Charles Goodrich for viewing building built by King for Chilton." 

The abstracted will of John Wall is as follows: 

"Will of John Wall of Parish of Westover, Pr. Geo. Co.

"To son John Wall, my plantation and land on which I now dwell after my wife’s decease.

"To son Michael Wall plantation on the Maaron [Meherrin] River, 100 acres, in Alley Whight [Isle of Wight] County, son to pay what remains to be paid on land.

"Wife Sarah to be exec.

"July 25, 1717

"John Livesay John (X) Wall

"John (X) Cleton

"Philip Claud

"Probated 8 Oct 1717." 

Sarah Wall returned to court in January and June 1718 to present the inventory of the estate of her late husband: 

"Inventory of John Wall. Value £ 11/18/6 by Edmund Irby, Daniel Higdon, Arthur Biggins. 14 Jan 1717. Exhibited by Sarah Wall, Exec." 

[Comment: The above date is an apparent example of the old-style dates — see explanation in the foreword of this book. It should therefore be interpreted as 14 January 1718 by our present calendar system.] 

"Inventory of John Walls. Value £ 21/10/0. By: Ed. Irby, Dan’l Higdon, Arthur Biggins. 10 June 1718. Presented by Sarah Wall, Exec." 

From the will, we know that John and Sarah Wall were the parents of at least two sons:

  1. John Wall; b. ca. 1690-1695
  2. Michael Wall; b. ca. 1690-1695; between 8 Jul 1749 (will dated) and 26 Dec 1749 (will probated) in Brunswick Co., Va.; m. Mary Jones(?)

"Will of Michael Wall of St Andrew’s Parish and B[runswick].

"To my friend Robert Jones — 1 Negro man named Jack and 1 entry of land lying on the north side of Faountains Cr, bounded by the lines of Hardin, Tomlinson, & Powell.

"To my sister Agnes — a suit of mourning and a ring, to be paid her within 1 month after my death by my executors, at the charge of my estate.

"To my son James Wall — the plantation whereon I now live, with all the lands thereunto belonging and surveyed, in an inclusive survey for me by Drury Stith, and I order that my executors take care to have a patent taken out for the same, at the expense of my estate, all of which lands I devise to my son James Wall."

"To my daughter Lucy Wall — all of my land not already hereby devised.

"As to the rest of my estate, I order that it be equally divided between my 2 children, James & Lucy. I order that my estate shall not be appraised.

"Executors: Robert Jones Jr, my kinsman, Walter Campbell, and Nicholas Edmunds, whom I also appoint guardians to my children.

"Signed Jul 8, 1749 — Michael Wall…" [probated 26 Dec 1749]

[Comment: Michael Wall’s naming Robert Jones as kinsman, guardian of this children, and granting him the first bequest, almost certainly means that Michael Wall and Robert Jones were bothers-in-law, i.e., Michael Wall’s apparently dead wife was the sister of Robert Jones, Jr.]

[Comment: Note that Michael Wall did not name a son, Michael, in his will. There are frequent references to a Michael Wall, Jr., in Brunswick records, and I had assumed until I saw the above that Michael, Jr., was the son of the above Michael Wall. John Wall, Sr., had a son named Michael, and all the references to Michael, Jr., may therefore be to the son of John, the "Jr." merely distinguishing him from his uncle — a very common practice in those days.]

From the above will of Michael Wall, and from a land record below, we know that there was at least a sister and a third brother. 

  1. William Wall
  2. Agnes Wall 

From a family group sheet compiled by F. Menger of Corpus Christi, Texas, yet another daughter was named: 

5. Sarah (or Leah) Wall; m. George Wyche of Sussex Co., Va. 

John Wall, son of John and Sarah Wall, was probably born circa 1685-1690 in Charles City County, Virginia (Prince George was created from Charles City in 1702). We do not have any information as to whom he was married. 

I have theorized, above, that it was he who in 1715 received a small patent for land on the Nottoway River: 

"31 Oct 1715. John Wall, on S. side of Nottoway River, on both sides of Waquiyough Creek. 185 acres."

[Comment: The Nottoway River meanders through the present counties of Brunswick, Sussex and Southampton, but all of which were then part of Prince George County, and later Brunswick.] 

A patent dated 17 December 1717 is revealing. In it:

"John Wall, of Pr. Geo. Co.; 100 acs. (N.L.), Is. Of Wight Co; on S. side of Maherin River; near lower end of the Dutchman’s Meadow; 17 Dec. 1717. For service performed towards making the new settlement for the Saponie Indians at Christianna, &c." 

The above patent was one in a string of patents to Owen Mirack of Isle of Wight, Francis West or Isle of Wight, John Baptis Curtis of Isle of Wight, John Persons of Surry, and of course John Wall of Prince George, all for land "being part of that tract of land whereon the Saponie Indians lately dwelt & which they have surrendered in exchange for a like quantity assigned them at Christanna" and "in consideration of divers services performed toward making the new settlement for the Saponie Indians at Christanna, pursuant to a treaty with that Nation." What is remarkable about this patent is that all the other men to whom these patents were made were from Isle of Wight and Surry Counties, indicating that John Wall, somehow, was associated with political interests outside Prince George County, that he was probably in the militia at that time, and that he was instrumental in moving the Indians to Christanna Fort [see below for a history of Christanna Fort]. As many of the deeds show, below, he subsequently lived very near the old fort in Brunswick County.

Confirming his Surry ties, he was issued two patents in Surry County, and named in another: 

"John Wall, 200 acs. (N.L.), Surry Co.; on S. side of Maherrin River; 11 July 1719. 5 Shill."

 "Daniel Crawley, of Pr. Geo. Co; 490 acs. (N.L.), Surry Co; on both sides of Maherin River; on an Island, on S. side of sd. river, cor. of John Wall; 18 Feb. 1722"

 "John Wall, 970 acs. (O. & N.L.), Brunswick Co.; on S. side of Maherin River; adj. John Carrell; Leadbetter’s Path; David Crawley; & George Walton’s land; 31 Oct 1726. 200 acs. part granted him, 11 July 1719."

 [Comment: Note that the 1719 patent of John Wall and the 1722 patent of Daniel Crawley clearly state the land was in Surry County, but the 1726 patent of John Wall is for land in Brunswick County. Brunswick was created in 1720 from Prince George, but it appears from the above that either part of Surry was included when Brunswick was created, or, more probably, that the land was so much on the frontier that no one really knew which county it was in.] 

It was undoubtedly this same John Wall, who we theorize to be our own, who was named in the will of David Crawley, dated 29 March 1729, of Prince George County: "…To Nathaniel Harrison, Esq., all my land, plantation, and stock on north side of Meherrin River adjoining John Wall and Henry Wych, towards payment of my debt…"

  It was also the same John Wall who received another patent in 1720 on what appeared to be the original property on Waqua Creek: 

"John Wall, 185 acs. (N.L.), Pr. Geo. Co., on S. side of Nottoway Riv., above the mouth of Waquiyouh Cr., 17 Aug. 1720, 20 Shill."

 [Comment: See below — today it is on the map and spelled as Waqua Creek. It meanders through the northern half of present-day Brunswick County. The Nottoway River is the boundary line between and Brunswick and Dinwiddie counties.]

  On the same day, and apparently in the same area, a Daniel Wall received a smaller patent: 

"Daniel Wall, 75 acs. (N.L.), Pr. Geo. Co., on S. side of Nottoway Riv., above the mouth of Slouches Cr., 17 Aug. 1720, 10 Shill." 

The proximity of the land and then entry dates of the patents probably indicates that Daniel and John Wall were closely related, and may have been brothers. Why, if they were brothers, Daniel Wall was not named in the will of John Wall (d. ca. 1717) would be a mystery (as shown below, William Wall was not named either).

Another patent reveals the name of another brother: 

"William Wall, of Pr. Geo. Co.; 80 acs. (N.L.), Brunswick Co; on S. side of Nottoway Riv., & on both sides of Waquiyough Cr., adj. his brother John Wall; 7 Jul 1726." 

The final patent in his name was issued in 1728: 

"John Wall, 330 acs. (N.L.), Brunswick Co.; on S. side of Nottoway Riv; near Waqua; adj. Winfield’s line; Vaughan’s line; & Peter Mitchell; by a Wolf Pit; 28 Sep 1728." 

One final patent in which he was named is worth noting because of the names contained in the patent, and the family riddles it suggests: 

"William Lucas, 1130 acs. (O. & N.L.), Surry Co.; on S. side of the Little Cr. Of the Three Creeks; adj. Col. Nathaniel Harrison; near head of the Myery Br; Robert Hicks; & Capt. Thomas Goodwin’s line; 25 Aub. 1731. 300 acs. granted Henry Peebles, 5 Sep 1723; 230 acs. granted sd. Lucas, 22 Feb. 1724; 600 acs. being waste land adj. 45 Shill., and Imp. Of 3 pers: John Wall, Roger Richards & James Gristin." 

Since we believe that John Wall was at least third generation in America, the notation above that William Lucas claimed him as a headright, is something of a mystery. Perhaps, and this is pure speculation, John Wall was sent back to England as an agent of William Lucas, and it is through this "importation" that John Wall was claimed as a headright. It was a common practice in early Virginia to claim a headright anytime anyone journeyed back to England and returned. 

[Comment: As I continue my research on the Wall family, and become familiar with the names that appear in association with them, I am beginning to piece together the picture that John Wall and cronies were Indian traders. David Crawley and Robert Hicks definitely were, as was Peter Poythress. Capt. Thomas Goodwin was a merchant, and sea captain, who might have been a part of their enterprise. If these men were all part of an organized company of merchants whose principal business was trade with the Indians, it would all fit. The fact that William Lucas claimed John Wall as a headright could very well mean that John Wall left the colony, and returned, on company business. Interestingly, this pattern could also explain the family’s move to Anson County, N.C. In the 1750’s, Anson County was frontier, and many of the earlier settlers to this area were, in fact, Indian traders. The "fact" (see below) that the Walls seemed to frequently return to their home in Virginia from North Carolina, may indicate that these trips were part of the business, i.e., they were periodically returning to Virginia for trading supplies.] 

In the Prince George County, Virginia, records, John Wall’s name appears frequently in connection with a mill he wanted to construct on the Nottoway River: 

"[9 January 1738 Court] Mark Harwell to appear in court to answer petition of John Wall for an acre of land on north side of the Nottoway River."

"[10 January 1738] Petition of John Wall to build a mill on land of Samuel Harwell, dismissed."

"Petition of John Wall for an acre of land on north side of Nottoway River, belonging to Mark Harwell, dismissed."

"In petition of John Wall for an acre of Mark Harwell’s land on Nottoway River to build a mill; it is granted and David Walker and John Robertson to view land and lay off an acre."

[Comment: The moral of this story seems to be that persistence pays off. One cannot help but wonder what legal principles were evoked in claiming someone else’s land to build your own mill! This series of claims does tell us that John Wall must have lived very near the Nottoway River, and very near the Brunswick-Prince George County line.] 

He appears in yet another Prince George County record: 

"John Ravenscroft, Gentleman, to view the bridge over the Nottoway River called Rayborns Bridge and with John Wall of Brunswick County, Virginia, Gentleman, to agree with workmen to repair it." 

Many of the records of Prince George County were burned in the Civil War, and this creates a problem for us in trying to trace this particular John Wall. Brunswick County was created in 1720 from Prince George, but did not obtain its own court until 1732 (until 1732 all Brunswick transactions took place in the Prince George court). This is important because with the creation of the Brunswick court in 1732, John Wall’s name appeared suddenly and very frequently in the Brunswick records. The fact that he was so active in the court records of Brunswick probably means that he was just as active in the Prince George courts whose records have been destroyed. 

Another confusing fact from the records, is that starting in 1728, John Wall’s son, John Jr., started appearing in the records. Fortunately we can distinguish between the two, because the younger John Wall seemed to always be referred to as "John Wall Jr." in the records.

  All of the deed and patent books in print do not contain all the land transactions that John Wall was involved in. I was very much surprised to find the following records in the Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia that show that he was granted huge tracts of land that never appeared in any of the other records. 

[9 Dec 1724] "John Wall and Michl Wall having joyntly petition’d this Board for Leave to survey two thousand Acres of Land in one Tract beginning on the So Side of Roanoak River at the old Western path, and it appearing that the said Land is within the County of Brunswick; It is the Opinion of the Council and accordingly Ordd; that the Petre be allowed (if they think fitt) to survey one thousand Acres each at the place aforesd, and to take out distinct patents for the same according to the Directions of the Lords Justice Instructions in that behalf, and in Case his Majty shall think fitt to allow a greater Quantity than one thousand acres to be granted in one Tract that then the Petre have Liberty to include the sd two thousand acres of Land in one joint Patent." 

[Comment: It would appear from the above that the Council was only authorized to issue patents for 1,000 acres, maximum. When John and Michael Wall asked for a joint patent for 2,000 acres — 1,000 acres each — the Council had to advise them that they needed to take out two distinct patents so that they would not exceed their limit and their authority. Bureaucracy was alive and well in 1724, but at least in those days the bureaucracy suggested a "work-around." The really curious thing, in my mind, is why did John and Michael Wall request a joint patent in the first place. As we shall see, John Wall did seem to have a stubborn, contentious, streak in him that impelled him to go against the grain, and to challenge authority.] 

[13 June 1728] "That the several persons who have entered Caveats in the Secretary’s office for stopping of patents for land … John Wall of Brunswick County against a patent for Thom Tomilinson of Surry County for 430 acres of land lying on the north side of Cat tail Creek in Brunswick County." 

[Comment: The above record seems to indicate that John Wall was, in fact, a that part of Prince George that became Brunswick in 1728.] 

[3 May 1744] "To lewis Parham John Wall John Merritt Richard Burch William Edwards Joseph Cloud Patrick Hall William Embry Thomas & John Embry Ten thousand acres lying Brunswick beginning at the Mouth of Marrowbone Creek on the Southside of Irwin River running up the said River & Creek in Quantity." 

[Comment: Marrowbone Creek is in what is now Mecklenburg County.] 

[15 Jun 1744] "To John Wall & William Macklin three thousand acres lying on Terrible Creek being a Branch of Staunton River in Brunswick beginning at John Walls upper Camp on the said Creek thence uyp & down for Quantity.

"To John Wall & William Macklin three thousand acres in Brunswick on Difficult Creek beginning at the lower part of John Jone’s land." 

[12 Jun 1746] "To John Wall four Thousand Acres in Brunswick between the Country Line and Poplar Creek adjoining Wilsons and Walkers Lands." 

John Wall first entered the official Brunswick records on 6 July 1732 when he was appointed one of the Justices of the new County. He must have been one of the original Justices, and apparently served in this capacity until his death. 

[22 April 1732] "Whereas in pursuance of the Act of Assembly for erecting the County of Brunswick a Court house for the said County is now built & by the increase of the Inhabitants of the said County judged in a Capacity to have Magistrates of its own It is ordered that a Comission of the Peace be prepared for the sd County & that Henry Fox Henry Embry John Wall John Irby George Walton Rd Burch Nathaniel Edwards Wm Wynn Charles King & William Mecklin Gent be appointed Justices for the said County…" 

"6 Jul 1732. John Wall took the oath of JP."

He was also by this time one of the leading citizens of the area as his being named one of the church wardens of St. Andrews Parish indicates: 

"1 Mar 1732/3. Henry Embry and John Wall, Gent, Churchwardens agst Jeffrey Sumerfield for 500 weight of tobacco or £0.50.00 which he owes them, the plt having a conditional judgment afst deft., [deft] now also failing to appear, at the motion of the plt’s attorney, ordered that the deft and his bail pay plts said sum + costs + an atty’s fee." 

John Wall’s name is frequently mentioned in Neale’s history of Brunswick County, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975

˜²™

"...during the early 1720’s large tracts of land that stretched south of the Nottoway into Brunswick County were granted to citizens of Prince George and Surry... John Simmons owned land south of the Nottoway on both sides of Waquayough (Waqua) Creek. John Wall, another future county court justice, also owned land on Waqua... Much of this land, which after 1720 was known as Brunswick, continued to be thought of as Prince George County."

"In February 1745, all the county’s western territory was made into Lunenburg County... John Wall and Nicholas Edmunds were commissioned by the Brunswick Court to oversee and recruit help for the laying of Brunswick’s new western boundary. Drury Stith made the actual survey..."

"...By 1732, the population had so increased that the Council decided to allow Brunswick to set up its own magisterial system and stand on its own. ...’Whereas in pursuance of the Act of Assembly for erecting the County of Brunswick a Court House for the said county is now built & by the increase of Inhabitants the said County judged is a Capacity to have Magistrates of its own. It is ordered that a Commission of the Peace be prepared for the sd. County, & that Henry Fox, Henry Embry, John Wall....William Machiln, Gent., be appointed Justices for the said County..."

"Most of Brunswick’s troops were in the militia, and had been serving as early as 1741. Prior to this date, Prince George County, from which Brunswick was formed, had been responsible for the protection of the county’s frontier. According to existing records it appears that on 2 July 1741, Colonel Henry Embry was the first militia officer commissioned in the county. Also commissioned in July and August, 1741, were: John Wall, Lieutenant Colonel; and Drury Stith, Major, in a Company of Horse..."

"In the early days of Brunswick County, when the Indians still lingered around the fort and the population was sparse, the church had little communication with its frontier members. ...the nearest minister was the Reverend John Cargill, of Southwark Parish. In 1724 he wrote the Bishop of London from his home on the James River, ‘My Parish is twenty miles in width and one hundred in length, being a frontier Parish. It has 394 families. The school for Indians is on the borders of my parish. There are one church and two chapels and seventy or eighty communicants.’

"The Parish of St. Andrew had legally begun before Cargill wrote his letter. When Brunswick was founded in 1720, the order setting up the new county also designated the area as St. Andrew’s Parish and provided money to build a church. The church was not built immediately, but was in existence before 1732.

"The St. Andrew’s Parish, Vestry Book, kept in the County Clerk’s Office, begins with an entry in July, 1732. A vestry is the elected administrative body of an Episcopal church. The first recorded vestry consisted of Henry Embry, and John Wall as Churchwardens... They were all paid 1000 pounds of tobacco for their services."

–w—

St. Andrew’s Parish Records

The records of St. Andrew’s Parish have been abstracted and published by William L. Hopkins. In these records, we find that on 7 July 1732, Henry Embry and John Wells [sic], Gents., were elected the first Churchwardens. The entry for 1 October 1732 recorded John Wall as present, and noted "John Humphry for grubing the church." He was present as John Well in the 4 January 1733 entry, which also noted "Maj. John Wall for James Francis Clerk at Meherin 8 months" [???] and "Maj. John Wall for Cloathing Widow Harris." The 16 April 1734 entry noted "Two Chappels to be built 40 X 20. Chapple on southside to Meherin River to be placed by Rev. John Betty, Col. Henry Fox, John Walls, Gents...", and "Maj. John Wall, Maj. Henry Embry and Richard Burch to employ workmen." John Wall was noted present in the 14 September 1735 entry, the 11 October 1735 entry, and the 6 November 1735 entry. The latter also noted "John Wall, Gent., is the cheapest builder of the church on North Side of Meherin River."

  The 4 October 1734 entry was very interesting: recording John Wall as present, it went on to note "Maj. Wall for a Vestry Book and Register Book," "Maj. John Wall for conering of John Luckes house where prayer is Read," and William Pool, joyner, for making 2 Outside Doors and Window Shutter for the Church." [This William Pool, or Pettipool, is either one of our Poole family ancestors, or a close relation — see Book 1.] John Wall was recorded as present in the 6 November 1734 and the 4 December 1738 entries.

  He was noted present in the 6 December 1735 entry, which also contained a list of "Processioners," with "John Wall, Gent., John Duglass and John Irby from Duglases run to fountain Creek down to roan Oak road to John Irby’s." He was not noted as present in the 3 February 1736 or the 7 April 1737 entries, but returned as present in the 6 August 1737 entry. He continued to be noted present on 4 December 1737 and 3 January 1739.

  On page 19 of the Vestry Book, it is recorded "Chappel to be built at a convenient place between Richard Browns, John Du (paper torn) [Dupree? — see below], Thomas Sisson 40 X 24. Maj. John Wall is appointed to Elect the place where it is to be built." The next page included a list of "processioners," which named "John Fennell, James Turner and Lewis Dupree from the mouth of the Cane Branch to the mouth of Fountain Creek on south side of Meherin River to the Extent of the County." [Lewis Dupree is an ancestor from the Mayes family line — see Book 4.] The list was signed by John Wall. The 31 March 1740 entry noted that "Mr. Nicholas Lanier and Mr. Charles King to select site for new church in the room of Mr. John Wall." Page 28 included another list of "Processioners," and on this list were John Wall, Gent., Lewis Dupree, and Joseph Mayes. [Joseph Mayes is a Mayes family ancestor — see Book 4.] The 31 October 1744 entry noted "William Pool for 6 Bottles Wine Claret." John Wall is then mysteriously missing from the records until 1749, when the 7 February 1749 entry noted his son, "John Wall, Jr. for a Dial and erecting a post."

  He is again noted as present in the 4 February 1750 entry, which also noted "Col. John Wall, Col. John Willis, Col. Nathaniel Edwards to let the building of the said church," and "Col. John Wall appointed Churchwarden." On 9 April 1751 he was recorded "Col. John Wall to pay John Walker and his wife Elizabeth Walker," and "Col. John Wall and Capt. Nicholas Edmunds, Churchwardens, to settle with William Maclin and Drury Stith, Gents." His son was also mentioned with "Capt. John Wall and Nicholas Edmunds, Churchwardens, to settle with the Executors of Mr. Sterling Clack, Decd., for the money William Embry paid said Clack."

  The 8 November 1751 entry includes the amusing: "Rev. George Purdie accepted as Minster. John Wall, John Willis, Nathaniel Edwards and Henry Simmons, Gents., state that they do not accept Rev. George Purdie as Minister." This state of affairs must have been smoothed over because the 18 January 1752 entry listed George Purdie as minister, and John Wall as present as a church warden.

  Other miscellaneous records from the first Brunswick Court Order book include the following examples (John Wall’s name appears on at least half of the pages of the books but none of the entries give us any significant clues as to his family connections):

"6 Apr 1733. John Wall, Gent, is appointed surveyor of the Bridle Road from his Mill to Chamberlains Ford…"

"7 Jun 1733. John Wall, Gent, is appointed to take the list of tithes from Chamberlains d__ to the extent of the County on the south side of Meherrin [River] and from the old County to the extent of the County on the north side Meherrin [River]."

"7 Jun 1733. On the attachment obtained by John Wall, Gent, against Walter Long, plt not prosecuting, the same is dismissed."

"Henry Embry, John Wall, and John Duke are appointed to treat with the Court of Surry County to agree about building a bridge over Nottoway River at such place as they can agree."

"4 Jul 1734. On the motion of John Wall desiring to know the objection of this Court to a recommendation of justices made last Apr 4, it was answered that they had nothing to object against the sufficiency of the persons that were recommended, but that they thought the situation of the said persons recommended for justices were not convenient for the County, and that the order that recommendation was not fairly obtained."

There was another family of Walls in Surry County, Virginia, that included a John Wall who appeared often in that county’s record books. All of the Surry County records are thought to refer to this other family (who are probably related to our Wall family), except the following, which definitely refers to our John Wall: 

"15 May 1738. Nicholas Hartford of Southwarke Parish in Surry County to John Wall of St. Andrew’s Parish in Brunswick for 15 pounds current money … 100 acres (being the land the said Nicholas Hartford now lives on and which he bought from John Pasmore). Also, one negro boy named Tom aged 12 years. Wit: John Irby, John Wall, Jr., George Crawley and Agness Wall."

 [Comment: Agnes Wall, above, is probably the unmarried sister of John and Michael Wall, who was named in Michael Wall’s will, shown above.]

  Though John Wall’s original land was on the south side of the Nottoway River, which is still in present-day Brunswick County, all the references to land on the Meherrin River by both he and his son, are in present-day Greensville County which was formed in 1783 from Brunswick. The following was excerpted from a Greensville County history to make this point:

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"Because of the complication created by new counties being cut off from older ones and the process repeated several times, it is difficult to name the first white men to settle in Greensville County before it was known by that name, but certainly any list of those who were there before 1750 would include the following:

"Captain Robert Hicks (the first to settle at the Ford); the Briggs; Arthur Kavenaugh; Ralph Jackson; Henry, William, James, George and Peter Wyche; Timothy Reeves; Major Charles Goodrich; James Parham; Captain Nathaniel Edwards; James Parham; Captain Nathaniel Edwards; William Batte (Batts); Benjamin Sewell; Captain Thomas Goodwin; Batte and William Peterson; Michael, William, John and James Wall; William and Samuel Lucas; William Maclin and his son, James, of Maclin’s Creek — a tributary of Three Creeks — Henry Beddingfield; Foster Cooke; Richard and George Brewer; Thomas Powell; and Isaac House. There were many more…

"Whatever these first settlers became as time went on, in the beginning they were what all pioneers are, Indian traders, interpreters, hunters, woodsmen and men of dauntless courage and unconquerable tenacity. Their ways in the beginning were necessarily crude and their homes primitive, but with the years some became wealthy landowners, brave soldiers and statesmen."

–w—

  Other Brunswick County records in which John Wall’s name appeared included the following: 

"John Smith. Inventory. 11 Feb 1732 [1733]. Appraised by Robert Hicks, Batt Peterson, Matthew Perrin, sworn before John Wall. Total valuation £23.4.[ ]. Returned 5 April 1733 by Nathaniel Perry, administrator."

"1 Jan 1741 from John Wall, Gent and Revd John Betty, Clerk of the Parish of St Andrew’s in B, to Charles King of same, for 51 £ 14 shillings and 1 penny sterling money of Great Britain + lawful interest from 15 Feb 1737 + the Clerk’s fee for recording a certain deed of mortgage, a certain tract of 572 acres of land on Sturgeon Run in St Andrew’s Parish and B, the same being part of 872 acres patented to said King on 8 Sep 1738, and by the said King, mortgaged to Wall and Betty by a B deed dated 15 Feb 1737, and is bounded by the mouth of a branch of Sturgeon Run called William’s Branch, School House Branch, said King, a place called the mire, Wm Gent, Robert Short, Sparrow. Signed — John Wall, John Betty. Wit — none. Recorded 4 Feb 1741."

"Inventory and appraisement of the estate of John Barton deceased. Total value: 7 £, 10 shillings, 6 pence. Pursuant to court order dated 7 Sep 1738, we, being first sworn by Maj’r John Wall, have met and appraised the estate of John Barton deceased, as it was shown to us by the administratrix. Signed 11 Sep 1738 — Charles Stewart, Lawrence House, John Irby [appraisers]…"

"Account Current of the estate of Joseph Turner deceased…
Per B Court order, we have stated and settled an account of Edward Green and Burchet, his wife’s admin. Of the estate of Joseph Turner deced, and find the balance due to the estate to be 119 £ 11 shillings 3.5 pence. Signed — John Wall, Michael Wall. Recorded 2 Oct 1740."

"Inventory and appraisement of the estate of Edward Clanton deced…
"Per B court order we, being appointed to appraise the estate and being first sworn before John Wall, Gent, a B JP…"

"1 Jun 1742 from John Wall of B, to James Sexton of B, for 25 £, all that tract of about 240 acres of lnad on which the said James Sexton now lives, and bounded as by the patent for the land. Signed — James (his mark) Sexton. Wit — John Betty, John Irby, Francis (his mark) Mitchell, Michael Wall. Recorded 3 Jun 1742."

"Account Current of the estate of Eliza. Hicks, widow, deced…. 1741 debits include payments to: … Colo John Wall, John Jones… Signed 6 Oct 1742…"

"4 Nov 1742 from John Davis of B, to Joseph Hensley of B, for 40 £, 2 certain tracts of land in B on the south side of Meherrin River containing 555 acres, of which 190 of the 555 acres is bounded by John Wall. The remainder, 365 acres, is bounded by John Wall, Christiana Fort, John Carrel (Carrell), Ledbetters Path. Signed — John (D his mark) Davis. Wit — Thos Cocke, Andw King. Recorded 4 Nov 1742."

"5 May 1743 from John Winfeild of Prince George County, to Samuel Craft of the Isle of Wight County, for 25 £, a certain tract of land of 200 acres (which was patented by said John Wifeild on 7 Jul 1726) in B, whose boundaries may be seen in said patent. Five acres, which said Winfeild has given to John Wall to build a mill on, are excepted…"

"Indenture tripartite made 13 Mar 1740 [1743? — see below] between James Munford of the County of Prince George, Gent of the 1st part, and William Stark and Theodorick Bland of same, Gentlemen, of the 2nd part, and Benjamin Harrison of B, planter, of the 3rd part… Signed — James Munford, Wm Stark, Theok Bland. Wit — John Wall, Walter Campbell, Samuel Gordon, Robert Jones Jr, Theophilus Feild."

"Indenture tripartite made 13 Mar 1743 between William Stark and Theodorick Bland of the County of Prince George, Gentlemen, of the 1st part, and James Munford of same, Gentleman, of the 2nd part, and John Hutchings of Norfolk County, Gentleman… Signed — Wm Stark, Theodk Bland, J Munford. Wit — John Wall, Samuel Gordon, Robert Jones Jr, Walter Campbell, Theophilus Feild.

"Will. I, John Chapman of Rockford in St Andrew’s Parish and B, Gentleman, being now in health of body and of sound mind, this 21 Dec 1740…
To my son Benjamin Chapman - all that part of the land I now live on, which is situated below the Quarter Spring, from which spring my will is that a due south line may be run by the County surveyor to the Fort Road, and down that road until it intersects with my lower line, then along the various courses of the lines between me and Walton’s back land, now in the possession of John Davis, Welchman, and Maj’r John Wall’s land to Maj’r Wall’s upper corner tree upon Meherrin River bank a little below the mouth of Hewsums Branch, then up the Meherrin River to the mouth of the Quaker Spring Gut, and up the Gut to the beginning, including the spring to my son Benjamin…"

"Account Current of William Maclin. Debits mention Moses Dunkley by court order, Henry Morris, Mr. George Wallton, to Colo John Wall, Mr. Theophilus Feild… This account was returned to B Court on 1 Dec 1743 by William Maclin, Gent."

"Account Current of Wall. Jul 1741. Debits include mention of: John Avent, George Hicks, John Maclin, Thomas Hardaway, David Williams, William Parks, William Edwards, Henry Bailey, Francis Morris, Robert Nicholson, Maj’r John Duke, cash due to me from St Andrew’s Parish. Total debits: 158 £ 11 shillings. Total credits: 156 £ 16 shillings 7 pence. Errors excepted 1 Dec 1743. The within account current was returned to B Court on 2 Dec 1743 by John Wall, Gent, and OR."

"[No date] From James Munford of the County of Prince George, Gentleman, as well as William Stark and Theodorick Bland of same, Gentlemen, who were authorized by the Court of the County of Prince George, to sell and dispose of the estate of the said Munford for the payment of his debts, to William Byrd, Esq of Charles City County, for 50 £, all that tract of 808 acres in B on the north side of Roanoke River and near the fork thereof, the same being bounded by [trees]. Signed — J Munford, Wm Stark, Theodk Bland. Wit — John Wall, Samuel Gordon, Robert Jones Jr, Walter Campbell, Theophilus Field, John Scott, John Jones, Thomas Jones. Recorded 7 Jun 1744."

"Will. 7 May 1744. I, Frances Hicks of B, being sick and weak but in perfect senses…
I order that no appraisement be made of my estate.
Signed — Frances Hicks. Wit — John Wall, Henry Beddingfeild, William Beddingfeild.
At a Court held for B 5 Jul 1744, this will of Frances Hicks, widow deced, was presented in court by James Hicks, one of the executors, and the same was proved by the oaths of John Wall, Gent, and Henry Beddinfeild, two of the witnesses…"

"Inventory of the appraisement of the estate of John Jackson deced… Per Court order 1 Jan 1746/7, we, being first sworn by Mr. John Wall Jr and Colo John Wall, have valued all the goods…"

"15 Oct 1747 from George Hicks of St Andrew’s Parish in B, Gent, to Robert Jones Jr of the Parish of Albemarle in the County of Surry, Atty at Law, for 400 £, all that tract of about 1310 acres of land in St Andrew’s Parish & B on the north side of Meherrin River…
Commission and certificate. To John Willis, Timothy Rives, George Wych, John Wall, and Richard Ransom, Gentlemen, Greeting. Sarah cannot conveniently travel to our County Court or to our General Court of Virginia to acknowledge the conveyance. You are therefore given the power to receive her acknowledgement by personally going to Sarah."

"Will. 27 Jun 1748. I, Richard Ransom of St Andrew’s Parish in B, being sick and weak but of sound memory…
Executors: my trusty friends Colo John Wall and Colo Nath’ll Edwards. And I appoint them, or the survivor of them, to be guardian to my 2 sons, James and Robin, whom I desire they may have bound apprentices when they come to the age of 16. Signed — Richard Ranone. Wit — Saml Bennett, John Wall Jr
At a court held for B on 6 Oct 1748, this will was presented by the exors, who refused to take upon themselves the burden of the execution, and the same was proved by the oath of Samuel Bennett, a witness, and OR. On the motion of the Francis, the widow and relict of the said testator, with John Wall and Nathaniel Edwards, Gent, her securities, entered into and acknowledged bond…"

"2 Aug 1748 from William Wise of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to Thomas Wise (son to the said William Wise) of B, for the natural affection which he has for his son and for 10 £, one certain tract of about 150 acres of land on the northwest side of the Cattail Cr in B, & bounded by Person’s branch on the line of James Wise, along the old line according to the 1st survey. Signed — William ([sideways] W his mark) Wise. Wit — John Wall, James Wall, John (his mark) Wise."

"3 Aug 1748 from William Wise of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to John Wise (son to the said William Wise), for the natural love he has for his son and for 10 £, one certain tract of about 150 acres of land on both sides of the Cat Tail Cr in B, and bounded by the mouth of Middle branch, Person, Persons’ Branch. Signed — William ([sideways] W his mark) Wise. Wit — John Wall, James Wall, John (his mark) Wise."

"2 Aug 1748 from William Wise of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to James Wise (son to the said William Wise), for the natural love he has for his son and for 10 £, one certain tract of about 150 acres of land on the northwest side of the Cat Tail Cr in B, and bounded by the mouth of the Middle branch, said James Wise’s old line. Signed — William (M his mark) Wise. Wit — John Wall, James Wall, Thomas (T his mark) Wise."

 [Comment: Who was James Wall? Note that in the Greensville County history information, above, a James Wall was listed among the Walls that settled the area. Michael Wall had a son named James, but from the wording of Michael’s will, above, James, his son, was still a minor in 1749. Was this James, the son of John Wall Sr.? — see will below.]

  A clue as to unknown family relations of John Wall and Thomas Goodwyn is obtained from a lengthy court case in which John Wall was the administrator of the estate of Thomas Goodwyn. John Wall’s involvement as Thomas Goodwyn’s administrator may indicate that John Wall was married to a daughter of Thomas Goodwyn, it may indicate some earlier realtionship by marriage, or as suggested above in a comment, Thomas Goodwyn may have been a close, and long-time, business partner of John Wall. For him to have been so heavily involved in Thomas Goodwyn’s estate and for such a long period is definite indication of some kind of close relationship.

Since Thomas Goodwyn’s name appears so regularly in the records of the associated families, the following record gives us some insight into this mystery man:

"Barbadoes: I, John Williams of Town & Parish of St. Michaels in the island aforesaid, and Rebeckah my wife, foremerly Rebecca Minnett, executrix of the will of Robert Minnett, appoint Capt. Thomas Goodwynne, Commander of the sloop ‘Henerico,’ now in the Island of Barbadoes, our attorney, to call into account John Owen of Virginia or elsewhere, for a negro boy Willey, formerly consigned to him by Robert Minnett, dec’d, and sold for £30, to recover either said negro or the money, 15 June 1713."

Whatever their relationship, business or family (or both), the following records establish the fact that there was a close relationship between the two. 

"John Wall, Gent, was granted administration of the estate of Thomas Godwynn, dec’d. John Davis and John Douglas were his securities…"

"Thomas Godwyn. Inventory. 3 Oct 1733. Apraised by Samuel Chamberlaine, John Irby and Nathanl. Edwards, sworn by Mr. Henry Fox in obedience to order of 6 Sep 1733. Total valuation £156.01.02. Includes four Negroes. John Wall swears to the inventory. Returned 4 Oct 1733 by [John Wall] Gent., admr. of Thomas Godwyn."

"7 Jan 1733/4. On the pet. of William Poole, plt, agst John Wall, admor of Thomas Godwyn, dec’d, deft, for £1.15.6, the plt having proved his account, and on hearing the arguments, Court orders deft to pay plt said sum + costs."

"Thomas Godwyn. Inventory. 6 Feb 1733 [1734]. Appraised by Samuel Chamberlaine, John Irby, Nathaniel Edwards (sworn 25 Sep 1733 before Henry Fox), who with John Brown were ordered to appraise estate 6 Sep 1733. Total valuation £74.14.8. Returned 7 Feb 1733/4 by John Wall, admr. of Thomas Godwyn."

"7 Feb 1733/4. In the case between John Davis, plt, and John Wall, admor of Thomas Godwyne, dec’d, ordered that John Duke, John Irby, Nathaniel Edwards, and Daniel Hicks audit the acct in difference."

"Hodges Godwyn, heir of Thomas Godwyn, dec’d, relinquished his right of administration to the estate of said Thomas Godwyn as it now stands in the hands of John Wall Gent."

"Thomas Godwyn. Estate account. Payments made to Capt. Nathaniel Edwards, William Poole, Clement Read (attorney in administration), James Powers, Moses Dunkley (for selling estate at outcry), Patrick Smith, James Pitillon, John May, Thomas Eldridge, Thomas Hardaway, The Reverend Mr. Betty, Stephen Dewe, Capt. Fisher, William Maclin, Jno. Bartholomew (his eighth part of the crop), Sir John Randolph. Receipts from sale of estate at auction: Capt. Nat. Edwards, John Davis, Saml. Chamberlayne, Capt. John Duke, Ralph Jackson, Robert Mitchel, John Mitchel, Daniel Hix, Capt. Natl. Edwards, John Vaughan, Patrick Smith, John Bartholomew, Capt. Robert Munford, Amos Tims, Francis Elledge, Charles Ross, Roger Tilman, Patk. Dempsey, Thomas Jackson, Henry Wych, Major Millekin, John Bradford, John Bettey, Charles King, John Talley, Xpr. Hinton, Richard Smith.
Part of estate was at John Butler’s.
7 Dec 1734. Account examined by John Wall, admr., Robert Hicks and Batt Peterson
7 Dec 1734. Returned by John Wall."
 

I have to admire the man; he had backbone and spirit! As the following Virginia Council records show, he often challenged authority, a quality that had to take courage in those days, when the King and his appointed Council were the supreme authorities. As some of the following records show, as well, he seemed to take something of a high-handed approach to surveys. In any case, whatever his motivation, he was frequently in trouble with the authorities. 

[5 Sep 1734] "Ordered that Mr John Wall Charles King John Duke William McCain and Nicholas Lancer Justices of Brunswick County be Sumoned to attend the Board on this Day Fortnight to answer their Contempt in refusing to Swear the Sheriff and breaking up the Court without doing any business." 

[14 Sep 1734] "Mr John Wall and the other Justices of Brunswick County according to the order of the Fifth Instant this day attended the Board and were Examined and heard Concerning their behavior upon presenting the Last Commission of the peace and it appearing that the disputes that have risen among the Justices of the said County have been occassioned by admitting into the Commission Some Persons lately recommended against the Inclinations of the Major Part of the Bench for removing all Further Contests. It is ordered that a New Commission of the peace Issue for the said County and that the Persons objected against be left out of the Said Commission." 

[1 Sep 1736] "Whereas upon reading the Petitions of Wm Macklin & Sampson Lanier in behalf of themselves & many others of the free Holders & Inhabitants of the Parish of St Andrew in the County of Brunswick, It appears to this Board that the Vestry of the said Parish have in Contempt of the Order made the 16th of April 1735 to which the said Vestry did submit directed two Chappels to be Erected in the said Parish greatly to the inconveniency of the Inhabitants. And now hearing Majr John Wall in behalf of the said Vestry as well as the Petitioners & due Consideration had of the Situation of the said Parish according to a Map thereof laid before this Board by the Surveyor of the Said County of Brunswick. It is ordered by the Governor by & with the Advice & consent of the Council that the said Vestry of St Andrews Parish laying aside all excuse & delays do forthwith proceed to order & direct one Chappel of ease to be Erected & built for the conveniency of the Inhabitants on the North side Meherrin River near the Plantation of James Lofton upon the three Creeks at a place where a School House now stands & that the other Chappel for the Conveniency of the Inhabitants on the South side of the said River Meherrin be Erected & built at a place commonly called Strowds Old Field, & that all other places directed by the said Vestry to be appointed for the said Chappels be hereby disallowed.

"And Whereas the said Vestry did heretofore Order a Chappel to be built for the conveniency of the Inhabitants on Roanoke contrary to the Intentions of the Board It is ordered that the said intended Chappel be not proceeded in, but that a House be hired & a Reader appointed at the charge of the Parish for performing divine Service as far as such Reader is capable untill the said Parish shall be in a Condition to build a Chappel for the said Inhabitants which at present are but few & inconsiderable." 

[17 Jun 1737] ‘On hearing the parties on the Petition & Caveat of Stephen Hughes against John Wall & John Ellis junr for Eight Hundred Acres of Land in the County of Brunswick. It appearing to this Board that the Surveyor of the said County hath laid off the said Land in an Irregular Manner contrary to the Orders of Government It is Ordered that the said Surveyor do Survey the Land of the said Ellis in such Manner as by the Orders of Government is directed and that the Residue be Granted to the petitioner Hughes." 

[12 Jul 1749] "Ordered, That a new Commission of the Peace issue for the County of Brunswick, and that John Wall be left out of it." 

[13 Oct 1749] "Ordered, That the Clerk summon John Willis Gent. of the County of Brunswick to appear at this Board, the Second of next Month to confront Mr John Wall of the said County, who has petitioned to be restored to his Place of a Justice." 

[2 Nov 1749] "John Willis Esqr and Mr John Wall appeared this day before the Council, and on hearing both Parties it was the Opinion of the Council that the said John Wall had not cleared up his Character in so satisfactory a manner as to deserve to be restored to his Place in the Commission of the Peace, that if he desired it, he might be indulged in other hearing …" 

In his rather remarkable career, John Wall Senior, was appointed or served as:

(He attended the Assembly sessions of 5 Aug 1736, 1 Nov 1738, and 22 May 1740 with Henry Embry as representatives from Brunswick. He attended the sessions of 6 May 1742, 4 Sep 1744, 20 Feb 1745, 11 Jul 1746, and 30 Mar 1747 as sole representative from Brunswick.)

(His brother, Michael Wall, was appointed a Justice in 1739, was surveyor in 1733, was sheriff in 1748-1749, and was Captain in the Brunswick militia in 1746.) 

We do not know to whom John Wall Sr. was first married — and the mother of most of the children named in his will below. Shortly after the death of her first husband, Burrell Brown in 1750, Mary Urvin Brown, daughter of Nathaniel Urvine and Elizabeth Peterson, married John Wall in June 1752. 

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"Mary Urvin married Burrell Brown, mentioned in the will of John Peterson in 1731. Brown was a surveyor in Brunswick County in 1737 and a justice in 1746 (Brunswick Co. Order books). He and his wife sold land in Brunswick in 1733. The will of Burrell Brown was dated January 1750 and recorded shortly thereafter. He mentioned his wife Mary, underage son Urvin, and daughter Betty. There was also a bequest to a William Wood, relationship not stated. His wife and friend Nathaniel Hicks were appointed executors, and the witnesses were Batte Peterson, Jeremiah Brown, and Thomas Rives.

Mary Urvin and Burrel Brown had issue:

  1. Urvin Brown married Mary Thweatt, daughter of John and Judith Peterson Thweatt
  2. Elizabeth Brown married in Brunswick Co. on 21 Sep 1759 John Cooke, John Peterson, surety, and Batte Peterson, witness. They moved to Fairfield Co., S.C.

"Mary Urvin Brown married secondly Col. John Wall. John Wall died testate in Brunswick County in 1761. His will, dated in 1752, mentioned his wife Mary ‘lately married to Burrell Brown’ and son George who was left 1000 acres. The daughter Mary was not mentioned, fixing her birthdate after 1752. Mary Urvin Brown-Wall died testate in 1763. Her will mentions sons George Wall and Urvin Brown, daughters Betty Cooke and Mary Wall, grandson Burrell Cooke.

"Mary Urvin and John Wall had issue:

"1. George Wall seems to have died without issue in 1768, intestate in Brunswick County

"2 Mary Wall seems to have married John Maclin. He died testate in 1779 in Brunswick County. He had been the executor of her half-brother Urvin Brown in 1776 and of his widow in 1778."

[Comment: In the same article, it is stated that Elizabeth Urvine, sister of Mary Urvine Brown Wall, was the wife of "Robert Hicks, the son of Robert Hicks — the Indian trader for whom Hick’s Ford was named — and his first wife Winifred Evans."]

–w—

  The abstracted will of John Wall Sr., dated 4 June 1752, and probated 27 April 1761, names (see below for a full transcript of the original will): 

"Wife: Mary (lately married to Burwell Brown). Sons: John, Michael, George, James. Land is given unto sons as follows: John, 300 acres; Michael, 1000 acres; George, 1000 acres." 

[Comment: See the full text of the will below. James was named executor and does seem to be the inheritor of the considerable residue (after naming his wife and other children) of the estate of John Wall. He was either the oldest child, or the oldest still living at home. This may mean that John Wall, Jr., had already departed for North Carolina.] 

Sons John and Michael, above, were apparently the sons of John Wall’s first wife. James, being named executor, was apparently an adult, and was therefore a son of the first wife. George was asserted to be the son of his second wife, Mary Urvin Brown Wall, and since only two years had elapsed between the death of her first husband and when this will was dated, George had to have been just an infant. Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek, in a private correspondence dated 1 February 1996, stated "The marriage date for John Wall and Mary Urvin was June, 1752, the same month as the will was written." If this last is true, then George could not possibly have been the legitimate son of John Wall. Recall that Burrell Brown had died two year previously, so George could not have been his son either! (I suspect that the "authority" citing the 1752 marriage date was really saying that they were married by 1752 — the date of the will. This still leaves us with the question of whether George was the son of John Wall’s first wife, or son of Mary Urvin Brown. But if George was the son of the first wife, why would he be the only Wall son named in her will?) 

Substantiating the above excerpt, regarding daughter Mary Wall, the following was entered into the Brunswick County Orphans Book: 

"Mary Wall, mother of Mary Wall, died by Oct 1763" 

Recapping, then, from our very limited information, John Wall and his first wife (unknown) were the parents of at least three sons: 

  1. John Wall, b. ca. 1705-1710 in Prince George Co., Va.; m. Ann Poythress ca. 1742-1743 in Brunswick Co., Va.
  2. Michael Wall; m. Rebecca Chapman 3 Dec 1745 (widow of John Chapman)
  3. James Wall

The asserted children of John Wall and Mary Urvine Brown Wall were:

4. George Wall; b. ca. 1751 in Brunswick Co., Va.; d. 1768

5. Mary Wall; b. ca. 1752-1753 in Brunswick Co., Va.; m. John Maclin 

The full transcript of John Wall’s will is provided below. 

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"In the name of God Amen I John Wall of the parish of St Andrews in the County of Brunswick being in health and of sound and disposing mind and memory thanks be to Almighty God for the same calling to mind the uncertain time of Certain Death do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following that is to say. First I Bequeath my soul to God who gave it in the Advocacy and _____ of my ever Blessed Lord and Savior Christ for Remission of all my past offences and by body I commit to the Earth to be buried Desantly entered at their Discretion of my Executor herein after mention and as to such Worldly Estate which it hath pleased Almighty God to Bestow on me I give and Dispose ___ of as follows to Wit. Imprimis I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife Mary the four negroe slaves that I had with her namely Digs, Hannah, ___ and Jack as her absolute property, also the stock of all sort on the plantation of her last husband Burrell Brown with every thing thereon that have any right in.

[Comment: The above bequest to his new wife reads to me like something of a pre-nuptial agreement, particularly when one considers the will was written so soon after their marriage, and that he died nine years later. I.e., he was certifying her rights to her own property by her previous marriage.]

"ITEM. I give and devise unto my son John Wall and to his heirs and assigns forever three Hundred acres of Land to be taken off the upper part of end of my tract whereon I now dwell and to include the plantation that my said son has already made thereon also his negroes. to wit. Abraham & Moll his wife, Will, Isane, Philby and Amy.

"ITEM. I give and devise unto my son Michael Wall and to his heirs & assigns forever, one thousand acres of land part of my land in the said County of Brunswick containing four thousand and nineteen acres to be taken off so as to join Valentine Whites, William Moseley and Hughes Lands and the Pigeon Roost Creek also my negroes to Wit. Tom and Liddie his wife, Beck and Charles, Frank and Margarett.

"ITEM. I give and divise unto my beloved wife Mary one thousand acres of my said tract of four thousand and nineteen acres of land to be taken of West(?) and thereof & to join Roger Tillman and David Walker and the County lines for and during the term of her natural life and ____ and immediately thereafter I give and devise the same unto my son George Wall and to his heirs and assigns forever.

"ITEM. I give and bequeath unto my son George Wall four negroes vizt Tom___, Abraham a boy of Lucy(?) and ____.

"ITEM. All the rest and residue of my estate in possession & remainder and Provisions of what nature(?) or Quantity James(?) the same is and ____ situate after paiments of my just debts and funeral charges and Devises aforementioned, I give and Bequeath and divise unto my son James Wall my soul Executor of this my Last Will and hereby Revoking Disannuling and making void all other and former Testaments by me at any time heretofore made. In testimony.whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this fourth day of June one Thousand seven Hundred and Fifty Two.

[Comment: 1000 acres of the 4019 acre tract went to son Michael, and another 1000 acres of the same tract went to his wife. That leaves 2019 acres that apparently went to James in the last provision. The part of the will naming James as his executor is the most difficult to read.]

"Signed Sealed Published and Declared by the said John Wall to be his Last Will and Testament. In Presence of us the subscribed who in this _____ have as Witnesses subscribed hereto.

Wm Eaton

John Thompson

Daniel Weldon

Robert Jones Junr 

"At a court held for Brunswick County the 27th day of April 1761 this will was presented into Court by James Wall Executor therein named who made Oath thereto according to Law and the same was proved by the Oaths of Daniel Weldon a Witness thereto who also disposed that he saw William Eaton, John Thompson and Robert Jones Junr the other Witnesses to the said Will Subscribe their names as such in Presence of the Testator and at his Request and is Ordered to be Recorded and on the motion of the said Executor who Together with Nathaniel Edwards and Richard Hall his securities entered into and Acknowledged Bond as the Law directs/Certificate is granted him for obtaining a J__bate thereof in __ form and at a court held for the said County the 22nd day of November 1762, the said Will was further proved by the oath of Robert Jones Esqr another Witness thereto and also deposed that he saw Wm Eaton and John Thompson two other of the Witnesses who are since dead subscribe their names as such in presence of the Testator and at his Request."

–w— 

John Wall was obviously anticipating the grant of the 4,000 plus acres on Pigeon Roost Creek as mentioned in the above will — he did not receive a patent for it until 1755, three years after making the above will: 

"John Wall, 4090 [4019?] acs. Brunswick Co. on the Brs. of the Poplar & Pigeon Roost Creeks & on the County line [West] adj. Roger Tilman, Walker, White, William Moseley & William Brewer; 10 Sep 1755. £20.S10" 

[Comment: There is another Brunswick will for a John Wall dated 22 Feb 1758, and probated 23 May 1758. This will names no wife, but does name children Burgess, Martha Moore, David, Mary, Robert, George, John, Ann, and Charles. "Land is given to sons as follows: Robert, 11 & 40 acres; John, land in Halifax Co." Just who this John Wall was is a complete mystery! He was obviously not as wealthy as his supposed kin of our line. Other Wall wills or administrations supposedly in the Brunswick County records are those for Daniel Wall (intestate, 1736) and William Wall (will, 1751). These are available to me in our local library.] 

Before proceeding with our next generation, it will be perhaps interesting and informative to provide a short history of Fort Christanna. As documented above John Wall Senior received some of his land for his part in resettling the Sapony Indians at Fort Christanna. And as shown, below, his son, John Wall Jr.’s, original patent in Brunswick County was very near the old fort. We can guess that Fort Christanna is very germane to the Wall family history in some presently unknown way, and that John Wall Senior, in his early years for which all the records have been lost, was somehow associated with the Indians, perhaps as an Indian trader, perhaps as a militiaman who was constantly being called to defend the frontier from the Indians. But perhaps he was one of the members of the Virginia Indian Company mentioned in the following article, and that his patent, above, was related to this activity. 

˜²™

"One of Virginia’s best Colonial Governors, Colonel Alexander Spotswood, founded Fort Christanna just four years after arriving in Virginia in June 1710. He found the colony anticipating an Indian war. Though forbidden by the Queen and restricted by a peace treaty, some inhabitants of North Carolina were causing trouble by settling in an area within three miles of the Meherrin Indian Town. The Meherrins were harassing the settlers in return.

"After the Tuscarora and other border Indians massacred the white settlers in eastern North Carolina, Governor Spotswood sent some of the militia out to prevent the Virginia Indians from joining them. He made arrangements to meet with the heads of the Tuscarora Indians who had not been involved in the war. He and 1600 militiamen from Prince George, Surry, and Isle of Wight Counties (900 on foot and 700 on horse) went to Nottoway Town.

"The Governor appointed a guard of about one hundred men for the fort outside the Town. He sent thirty horsemen to meet the Tuscarora Indians at the Saponie town, probably at Unety (Unote) on Meherrin River. The next day he divided the militia into companies of fifty men each with captains over them. The Tuscaroras came with their guard and Peter Poythress [Chapter 12], an Indian trader and interpreter. The Governor reviewed the cavalry, drew up the militia in formation, and made the Indians walk from one end to the other. This impressed the Indians greatly. They agreed to deliver two children of the great men of each Indian town to remain as hostages and be educated at the school for Indians at William and Mary College. This proposal was renewed to the Virginia Tributary Indians who already had sent some children there because if freed them from paying the yearly tax of twenty beaver skins.

"As a result of the Indian disturbances in North Carolina and Virginia, the General Assembly passed, in November 1711, the Act Appointing Rangers of the frontiers. The commanders, appointed by Spotswood, could choose their own eleven men with horses, arms and ammunition. The Assembly voted the sum of £1000 to be used by the militia and Tributary Indians to help North Carolina. It was not needed at this time, but the money was used later.

"Some of the Senecas who had helped the Tuscaroras were killed by a party of Tributary Indians. This caused the Northern Indians to raid the frontiers, steal from the Indian traders, and murder some of the frontier settlers. As a result, parties of Rangers were kept in each frontier county.

"In December 1713 Governor Spotswood told the Assembly of his plans for forts on the frontiers. After making treaties with the Sapony, Nottoway, and Tuscarora Indians who agreed to make peace and come under the protection of Virginia, the Council and Governor decided that the forts should be built at the proposed Indian settlements. However, the Tuscaroras who had fled to the upper Roanoke and who had intimated they would like to settle in Virginia and become tributaries, changed their minds and returned to North Carolina.

"In July 1714, Governor Spotswood started out on his six-week expedition to the southern frontier to carry out the provisions of the treaties he had made. At this time Colonel John Allen, of Surry, laid out the tract of land, six miles square (23,040 acres) on both sides of Meherrin River, on which the Indians would settle. This was in later Brunswick County, near Lawrenceville [in present-day Brunswick County]. The Sapony, Occoneechee, Stuckanox, and Totero Indians were to settle on the south side of the river. They spoke the same language but preserved their different rules. The Nottoways and Meherrins were to settle on the north. They could not live peacefully with their traditional enemies, the Saponies. The Nottoways and Meherrins, however, decided not to move from their old lands but to remain where they were.

"Governor Spotswood named the settlement Christ-Anna (or Christanna) in honor of Christ and Queen Anne. He placed there a guard of twelve white men and an officer. They were to range, two or three of them at a time, with ten or twelve Indians. In times of danger they would range the woods between the settlements from Roanoke River to the Appomattox.

"The Guard of the Fort and the men of the Virginia Indian Company were entitled to use the land within the six mile limit. At this time the nearest inhabitants lived fifteen miles east, at Hicksford [present-day Emporia, county seat of Greensville County].

"In 1714 the Assembly decided to reduce the Rangers to four troops consisting each of six men and an officer, besides the guard at Fort Christanna. The guard was paid for two years out of the unused money that had been raised to help North Carolina. The remainder of the money was to go towards finishing the fortifications and for other services. At the end of two years the Indian Company would pay the guard. None of the twenty-eight Rangers were ever employed to keep guard in Christanna, but some would have visited there for supplies.

"Some of the Indians settled at Christanna while Spotswood was there in the summer of 1714. At this time he placed a teacher among them, Charles Griffin, whose salary of £50 a year he paid. He later wrote to the Bishop of London that he had also conferred with Mr. Forbes, a clergyman, to settle there, but ‘his retiring soon after into a married State, has chang’d his inclinations.’

"The Virginia Indian Company, ‘a joint stock company open to all Virginians then engaged in the Indian trade,’ was established by an act of the Assembly in 1714, with headquarters at Christanna. The twenty members, paying between £50 and £100 per member, elected Spotswood as president of the company. Its purpose was to regulate and conduct the trade between the Indians and the Virginians. Formerly the Virginia Assembly had licensed men as Indian Traders in an effort to control their conduct. Some of the traders had cheated the Indians, sometimes by getting them drunk. The Indians knew of no other way to avenge themselves other than by killing any whites they met, or by stealing from them. Now the Indians were required to bring their goods to one place, Fort Christanna, for trading in open market, under the regulation of the Indian Company.

"Among the obligations of this Company was that of building, at its own expense, a school house for the Indian children. In 1720 a reference is made to Griffin’s school on a creek about six miles west of Fort Christanna, at one of the Indian towns, probably on Genito Creek or on Avent’s Creek. Whether this was the same as the original remains to be seen.

"In March 1715 the Governor went again to Christanna. This time he settled 300 Saponies there. They had seventy children at the school where the children learned to read, write and speak English, and were taught about the Lord Jesus Christ. They soon learned to say the Lord’s Prayer, the Ten Commandments, and the Creed.

[Comment: Was this the resettlement referred to in John Wall’s patent?]

"On this trip he completed the building of the fort itself, ‘on a high eminence’ on the south side of Meherrin River (now just south of Lawrenceville, on route 686). It was a few miles east of the old Occaneechee or Western Trading Path, the main artery of trade and travel from North to South.

"In 1716 a man wrote from Chowan, North Carolina, to Richard Beresford, ‘I am just returned from Virginia where I was informed that the fort built at Christ Anna by Col. Spotswood was finished. It lyes on Meherrin River abough a small dies march from Moratoke [old name for Roanoke River], and about 50 or 60 miles from some part of James River and Appamatocks River. The fort consists of five large pentagonal log-houses which serve for bastions, and a curtain of mault [split] wood with earth on the inside from one house to another. Each house has a great gun 1400 lb. Each, etc…

"‘I say [saw] abundance of iron, steel, and other utensils carring thither. There is a couple of forges sett upp…

"This description coincides with that of Jacques Fontaine who accompanied Governor Spotswood to Christanna in 1716. In his ‘Memoirs’ he said it was an ‘inclosure of five sides, made only with palisades, and instead of five bastions, there are five houses; each side of the five sides is 100 yards long.’

"The Virginia Indian Company had built bridges and roads and constructed the wooden building at the Fort. At the center of the fort was the magazine. Here were kept the powder, ammunition, guns, and small cannon ordered to be sent there in May 1715. This building may have been eight-sided, about twelve feet high and fifteen feet across, with a pole at the top for the flag. It would have had a floor about two feet above ground to insure keeping the powder dry.

"It had been ordered that the cannon already at the fort be mounted. These large pieces of cannon (five or six feet long) were mounted on wooden carriages within each of the five pentagonal buildings. These buildings must have been at least fifteen feet wide to accommodate and use the cannon. A supply of round ball for the cannon and a keg of powder were also kept on a wooden floor in each building. After the cannon was loaded, its barrel was projected through a gunport.

"The Guard fired the morning gun each day, to establish the time and test the powder. It might also have impressed on the Indians that there were guns defending the Fort.

"Within the fort were warehouses for the furs bought from the Indians and for the supply of European trade goods. There would have been a crib for corn to feed the horses, a building to store smoked meat and other food, such as the ‘two thousand weight of Bisquet’ ordered to be sent to the Fort in May 1715 ‘for the subsistence of the forces drawn there for the security of the frontiers.’ There would have been a building for them to cook and eat in, with a well nearby. Other buildings would have been one and two room sleeping quarters, and a building to house any slaves who grew the supply of hay and corn for the horses and food for the men. There was at least one blacksmith shop.

"The land for the fort, and the land around it, was cleared as far as a ‘musket shot’ — at least 100 yards. All large trees within one-half mile would have been cut down, as the cannon at that time was accurate for at least one-half mile, although their projected range was one mile.

"Fontaine wrote that while at Christanna, he and the Governor laid out an avenue one-half mile long. The Chowan letter-writer stated: ‘The Gov. is now building a handsome house near Christanna, where he intends to live when he shall be out of the government. It will cost him 5 or £600 sterl. and divers other people encouraged by the governor’s example are setling plantations that way … it is expected to be a place of note.’ Apparently the Governor hoped to establish a town here.

"Spotswood wrote to the Bishop of London on 3 May 1716 asking for a contribution towards building a church at Christanna and establishing a minister there. He said, ‘Abundance of people, tempted by the goodness of the Land, are seating near that place, but are above 60 Miles from any parish Church. These would willingly contribute as much as they are able towards the support of a Minister, and in a few years, I dout not, their Number will be so increas’d as that a parish may be erected there. I have already set apart a Tract of very good land for a Glebe, and am now building a house which a Minister may have the use of for his residence, and I am perswaded if a good man be sent in, the Indian Company will not be wanting on their part to give him all suitable Encouragement …

"Fountaine told of the headmen of the Sapony Indians bringing skins to the Governor at the fort. He said they were fond of ceremony. Even if they could speak English, when they spoke of anything concerning their nation, it was spoken in their tongue through an interpreter. They would not answer any questions unless they were asked in their own language.

"Governor Spotswood and Fontaine ‘went to a nearby Saponey village, about a musketshot away [from the fort]. It lieth on a plain by the river, the houses join all the one to the other, and altogether make a circle. All doors [are] on [the] inside of [the] circle, and the ground with-inside is common between all people to divert themselves. In [the] center is [a] great stumpt of a tree — for one of their headmen to stand on when he makes a talk.’

"The houses were large, with no light except from the doors, and had holes in the roof to let out the smoke. They used pots, wooden dishes and trays. There were small divisions in the houses to sleep in, mats of bullrushes, and bedsteads raised about two feet from the ground, upon which lay skins and blankets.

"‘Between the town and the river are several whittle [sic] huts built of wattles [grass plastered with clay] in the form of an oven — big enough to hold a man — sweating houses.’

"It was the custom for the Indians to surrender their arms whenever they entered the Fort. On 9 April 1717 the Governor went to Christanna to meet the Great Men of the Catawbas and other Western Indians who, having been promised goods at cheap rates at the Fort, had brought with them some of their children to be hostages and educated at the school. Next day the Indians, lying unarmed in their camp about 50 yards from the Fort, were attacked suddenly at dawn by a party of the Senecas and Tuscaroras, who killed five, one of whom was Queen of the Catawbas. They wounded two, and carried off five prisoners including the Chief of the Catawbas, one of the greatest and most influential Indians in the South. The Indians suspected the English of being traitors. They were finally persuaded otherwise, and left eleven children at the school. One the prisoners who escaped reported later that the Iroquois had come down to surprise the Saponies, and threatened to return soon to massacre the whole tribe and any of the whites who might try to befriend them.

"True or not, this caused great fear among the English settlers and traders. The men hired by the Indian Company to guard their caravans and cargo were so afraid that it was hard to find one who would go out on that service. The Indian Company had spent nearly £3000 for horses, supplies, and provisions, and advanced money to several of the men. Now it was doubtful that they would be able to send out their cargo this summer because they lacked enough men to guard it. Usually about forty men went out together to trade with the Western Indians.

"Soon after this, the Act for Better Regulating the Indian Trade was repealed and the Virginia Indian Company was dissolved. On 12 November 1717 the Governor reminded the Council that formerly the Indian Company had kept up the Fort of Christanna, maintained the Guard, and supported the hostages of the Southern Indians, and asked how these would be taken care of in the future. The Northern Indians were threatening to destroy the Tributary Indians settled at the Fort, and recently they had murdered some of the English settled at Roanoke River. The Fort was intended to defend them.

"The Council recommended to the former members of the Indian Company that they continue repairing the fortifications, keep the same Guard as in the past, and take care of the hostages until the General Assembly should make some decision about them. The Government would reimburse the Company for their expenses. The Council also recommended that the Governor encourage members of the late Indian Company to continue their trade, and that he continue the same allowance to the school master as he had in the past.

"On 31 May 1718 the General Assembly decided not to keep up the Fort. The was nothing the Council could do about it.

"As a result, several men employed by the Indian Company for the Guard of Fort Christanna became mutinous and disorderly, refused sentinel duty, and so exposed the Fort and the hostages there to great danger because the northern Indians were again on the frontier. The Council ordered that the commander, Captain Robert Hicks or any other person the late company had employed for the management of their affairs, be given power to correct or punish any of the Company servants who refused to do their duty. If they tried to desert, Captain Hicks was to order out parties of Indians to pursue and bring them back.

"The northern Indians went so far as to send a message to the officer who commanded the Fort, demanding that the Sapony Indians (their enemies) be delivered over to them. Therefore, in the summer of 1718, Spotswood moved all of the Sapony Indians into the Fort for their protection.

"In 1719 the Governor of Pennsylvania wrote to the Virginia Council that the northern Indians had marched toward Virginia with the intention of testing the strength of the English at Fort Christanna. The Council decided to halt any attempted march through Virginia. The Militia was ordered not to shoot until shot at. The Virginia Tributary Indians were ordered to notify the Government if any northern Indians arrived at their towns.

"There are local traditions of a fierce fight between the Saponies and the Genitoes (northern Indians). Bullets have been plowed up in the low grounds on the north side of the Meherrin River, opposite the Fort site.

"After the creation of Brunswick County in 1720, the region around the Fort and beyond was becoming well-settled. All Indians were required to get a passport to go through settled country.

"On 13 June 1723 the Council heard a petition of Thomas Jones in behalf of the late Virginia Indian Company, in which the former members asked to be reimbursed for their expenses in repairing the fortifications of Christanna, according to the orders of the Governor, dated 12 November 1717. The Council ordered that they be paid. This seems to be about the time that the officers and men left the Fort permanently.

"The Sapony Indians were still occupying the Fort in 1728 when Colonel William Byrd went on the expedition to lay out the dividing line between North Carolina and Virginia. On his return trip, he stopped at the plantation of George Hix (Hicks) on Meherrin River, near present Diamond Grove. The Grandees of the Sapony Nation came to the plantation to meet him, as one of their number, Bearskin, had gone on the journey as guide and hunter. Byrd wrote that the Indians had come on horseback, which, he said ‘was certainly a Piece of State, because the Distance was but three Miles, and ‘tis likely they had walk’t a foot twice as far to catch their Horses.’

[Comment: To help to put things into perspective, it was in 1728 that John Wall, Jr., received his first patent on land that adjoined the Indian land of Fort Christanna — see below.]

"In the spring of 1729 the Governor received news that the Sapony Indians had made no preparation for planting corn; it seemed probable that they were preparing to leave the Fort. The inhabitants of Brunswick County were apprehensive, fearing that the Indians might make trouble as they left. The Council appointed someone to go with the interpreter, Charles Kinball, to the Indian Town to observe what preparations they were making to continue there, so that suitable measures might be taken for protecting the inhabitants. The Journals of the Executive Council, in October 1729, state that ‘the Sapony … have lately deserted their settlement … [in Virginia] and joined the … Cattawba Indians.’

"In 1730 the members of the late Virginia Indian Company petitioned for 1000 acres ‘where Fort Christanna stood,’ on the south side of the Meherrin River and back into the woods, and 1000 acres on the north side of the river. They also requested that 23,040 acres of land formerly assigned for the Sapony Indians be laid out and granted to the petitioners who pointed out that they had invested money in buildings and improvements at the Fort. This was done.

"In June 1733 the Sapony and Nottoway Indians met with the Governor and Council. The Saponies were given permission to join the Tuscaroras if they wished, provided that neither Nation would hunt on any lands patented in Virginia, nor go among the inhabitants in groups of more than three. The Saponies were permitted to stay at their town until their corn was gathered. If they decided not to join the Tuscaroras, they were to move to some place beyond the inhabitants between the Roanoke and Appomattox rivers.

"Soon after this they all left the Fort. Some joined the Catawbas, and some eventually joined the Five Nations of the Iroquois in New York.

"After the Indians left the region, all their former lands were taken up in grants. The site of the Fort became known as Fort Hill Plantation. In 1847 an iron cannon was still on the hill. One cannon exploded in Lawrenceville when fired during Cleveland’s inauguration; another was taken to William and Mary College. Tradition says three are in the Fort’s old well.

"The road that went by the Fort, from Gholsonville to the lower-cut banks on Nottoway River, became known as Fort Road, eastward it crossed the Meherrin at Hickford (Emporia), then on to James River. Among the owners of Fort Hill Plantation, by which the road went, was the Jones family, descendants of Benjamin Jones of Greensville. The present owner is Mr. Clyde Butler of Lawrenceville.

"On 24 September 1923 the Colonial Dames purchased from T. E. Jones, N. S. Jones, and W. M. McAden 3 ¾ acres ‘being that portion of the tract of land known as ‘Fort Hill’ plantation, which includes the site of the frontier fort erected in the year 1714…’ However, recent topographical studies indicate that the actual Fort site is not at the monument but is nearby.

"The Colonial Dames brought the story of Christanna to a fitting conclusion. On 24 May 1924 they had a dedication ceremony at the site where they placed a cannon as a monument. Pamunkey Indians from the reservation in King William County were present in tribal dress."

–w— 

ohn Wall, son of Colonel John Wall, was probably born about 1705-1710 in Prince George County, Virginia. This presumed date of birth is partially confirmed by the following land records in his name: 

"28 Sep 1728: 387 acres (N.L.) SS Meherrin River, E side of the Great Creek below Christianna Fort on the Indian line."

"1 Feb 1738: 238 acres on Great Creek below the Fort, bounded by his other land."

"6 May 1747 from John Wall Jr of B, to Jacob Woolcey of B, for 80 £, 2 tracts of land on the south side of Meherrin River & on the east side of the Great Cr below Christiana Fort in B. The 1st tract contains about 487 acres, & is bounded by the Indian Line, being a tract of land patented to said Wall on 28 Sep 1728. The 2nd tract contains 238 acres contiguous to the 1st tract, and is bounded by the creek, it being patented to said Wall on 5 Feb 1738. Signed - John Wall Jr. Wit - Chalres Chamberlin, Daniel Sears, Anne, the wife of the said John, appeared in Court, and being first privately examined, voluntarily relinquished her right of dower to the lands conveyed. Recorded 6 May 1747."

We have theorized that John Wall married Ann Poythress about 1740. In Robert Hicks’ Brunswick County will dated in early 1739, Ann Poythress is named as a witness. (Robert Hicks had been the commander of Christanna Fort, and was a Brunswick County neighbor of the Wall family.) Thus, from this document and the will of her presumed father, Joshua Poythress, we know that she was both an adult and single in 1739. No other records have been found that name her, indicating that she probably married soon afterwards. The above land record, dated 1747, definitely proves that John Wall had married an Ann by 1747. Narrowing the date down further, John Wall bought and sold a tract of land in 1742 and no wife was named with a right of dower (to have a right of dower, the wife had to have been married when the land was acquired). My best guess, then, would be that he married Ann Poythress about 1742-1743. 

John and Ann Poythress Wall were perhaps the parents of at least two sons and two daughters: 

  1. Mary Wall; b. ca. 1735 in Virginia; m. William Covington (b. 1726, Essex Co., Va.) 26 Jul 1750

[Comment: The William Covington, above, is a complete mystery and the source of much confusion in the published Wall and Covington family histories. There was a William Covington in Essex County, Va., and there was a William Covington in early Anson County records who may have preceded our Covingtons to N.C. I have found no relationship of this William Wall to our Covingtons, however. In our line, there was a William Covington who came to Anson Co., N.C., before the others, but he was not married to Mary Wall. A later William Wall (brother of the John Covington who married Nancy Wall) is not thought to have been married when he was killed in the Revolutionary War. So who was the William Covington who is reputed to have married Mary Wall? There is a record of a Mary Wall marrying William Covington in 1750. But our information suggests neither the Walls nor the Covingtons came to N.C. as early as 1750. Was Mary Wall even related to our Wall family? One author, below, theorizes that Mary Wall was the sister (not the daughter of John Wall of Virginia. There is simply no hard evidence that we have a relationship to either Mary Wall or William Covington.]

[Comment: If Mary Wall was indeed a daughter of John Wall, then she was probably the daughter of a first wife, and not of Ann Poythress.]

2. John Wall; b. 1746 in Virginia; d. 28 Feb 1831 in Richmond Co., N.C.; m. (1) Agnes Moorman in 1769 in Anson Co., N.C., (2) Martha (Pretty Patty) Cole 21 Jun 1781

  1. William Wall; d. between 1799 (will dated) and 1801 (will proved) in Anson Co., N.C.; m. Lucy _____
  2. Nancy Wall; b. ca. 1748; d. 1826; m. John Covington [Chapter 10] 26 July 1770. 

[Comment: The following records from the St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book intrigue me: 

[27 Jun 1768] "William Cealey for maintaining and nursing Mary Wall, a child of Ann Wall, deceased."

[3 Jan 1770] "William Caley for keeping Mary Wall, a Bastard child."

[10 Dec 1770] "William Cealey for keeping Mary Wall, a Bastard child, from 1 Jul to present."

[20 Jan 1773] "John Edwards, Jr., for keeping Mary Wall 1 year."

[27 Nov 1773] "George Sadbray for keeping Mary Wall."

[18 Apr 1775] "George Sadbray for keeping Mary Wall."

Is it possible that the Mary Wall referred in the above records was an illegitimate daughter of Ann Poythress Wall? The records definitely state that Mary Wall was the daughter of an Ann Wall who had apparently died by 1768. John Wall, Senior, had no daughters of whom we know who were named Ann. If not Ann Poythress Wall, who was the Ann Wall who had an illegitimate daughter Mary, and who died before 1768?] 

A 1748 Brunswick "poll of voters" lists John Wall, Jr., in the district counted by "Col. John Wall," along with Michael Wall, Jr. Other Walls enumerated in this "census" were Michael Wall, Jr., in Capt. Edmunds district, and William Wall and John Wall in the district of Drury Stith. This poll or census was reported by "Michael Wall, Sheriff." 

Like his father before him, John Wall Junior, was very involved in local affairs of government and the militia. In 1746 he was named one of the Justices of the county, and that same year was named as one of the county surveyors (and again in 1752), while serving at the same time in the county militia as Lieutenant. In 1748 he was the under-sheriff, under his uncle Michael Wall. 

The following abstracted record from the Charles City County records shows that John Wall, Jr., was still owned land in Charles City/Prince George County in 1761. 

"Deed John Wall, Jr. of Brunswick Co. to William Kennon, Gent., of this county, proved by George Minge, John Dancy and James Backhurst." 

[Comment: Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, Calif., in a personal note dated 18 Feb 1996, stated "I tried to obtain the original deed but it was N/A in Va. archives."] 

John Wall Jr.’s name appeared frequently in the Brunswick County records, usually as a witness to deeds, wills, etc. I have chosen to include most of these for the value of the other names in the records that might reveal some family relationships. 

"28 Mar 1741 from Henry Cooke of B, to Thomas Morris late of Prince George County, for 25 £, a certain tract of land of about 215 acres, and bounded by the west side of Oconecha Swamp, Francis Steed. Signed — Henry (HC his mark) Cooke. Wit — Michael Wall, John Wall, Jr, Mary Wall, Agnes Wall…"

[Comment: As noted above, it is presumed that Agnes Wall was the unmarried sister of John Wall, Sr., and aunt of John Wall, Jr. But who was Mary Wall? John Wall Sr. married Mary Urvine Wall ca. 1750, 9 years after the above deed was made, so this could not be in reference to her. Was this a reference to the wife of Michael Wall (who was probably a Jones), or was John Wall Sr.’s first wife also named Mary?]

"4 Aug 1741 from William Chamberlin of B, to Samuel Chamberlin of B, for 10 £, a certain tract of land of about 100 acres, and bounded by the north side of Meherrin River at a corner of Colo John Allen, the 1st long gut of the river, Samuel Chamberlin’s old line. Signed — William Chamberlin. Wit — Michael Wall, John Wall Jr."

"15 Jul 1741 from William Simmons of Southwark Parish & County of Surry, to Edmund Ruffin of Albemarle Parish and County of Surry, for 10 £, one tract of land of 147.5 acres on the north side of Meherrin River in B… Wit — Thomas Person, John Wall Jr, Nicholas Edmunds, Jacob Person."

"2 May 1742 from Lizwell (Liswell) Sexton of B, to John Wall Jr of B, for 25 £, all that tract of 100 acres of land whereon he now lives, being part of a survey of 440 acres made by James Sexton, and by him conveyed to Lizwell Sexton, being bounded as by the patent of the land. Signed — Lizwell (S his mark) Sexton. Wit — John Betty, Michael Wall, John Gillespie, Fras (+ his mark) Mitchell. Recorded 3 Jun 1742."

"2 Sep 1742 from Amos Timms of B, planter, to Richard Witton of Henrico County, Merchant, for 80 £, a certain tract of land of about 305 acres, being part of a tract of land which the said Timms purchased of John Humphreys deceased. The land is in B on Rose’s Cr, and bounded by Rose, Ravenscroft, the head of the Spring branch, the mouth of the Little Cr, Brown. Wit — John Wall Jr, Walter Campbell, George (G his mark) Beltshire…"

"23 Nov 1742 from John Wall Jr of B, to James Sexton of B, for 10 £, a certain tract of about 240 acres of land on the north side of Fountains Cr in B, and bounded as by its patent, being the land formerly sold by said Sexton to said Wall, and whereon said Sexton now lives. Signed — John Wall Jr. Wit — John (his mark) Smith, Francis (+ his mark) Mitchell, Lizwell (his mark) Sexton. Recorded 2 Dec 1742."

[Comment: Note that if John Wall Jr. had been married before, his first wife must have died by 1742, since no wife of John Wall was recorded as relinquishing her right of dower. Note that he purchased at least part of this land in May of that same year. This probably means that he had not yet remarried, a wife did not obtain right of dower to property if she was not married at the time the property was purchased.]

"24 Nov 1742 from John Wall Jr of B, to Lizwell Sexton of B, for 5 £, a certain tract of about 100 acres of land on the north side of Fountains Cr in B, and being the land formerly conveyed by said Lizwell Sexton to Wall Jr, and bounded as by the said deed. Signed — John Wall Jr. Wit — John (his mark) Smith, Francis (+ his mark) Mitchell, James (his mark) Sexton. Recorded 2 Dec 1742."

"31 Dec 1742 from James Sexton of B, to Lizwell Sexton of B, for 10 £, a certain tract of 100 acres of land in B on the north side of Fountains Cr, bounded by the mouth of Lizwell Sexton’s Spring branch on the north side of the Cr, John Smith’s land. Signed — James (his mark) Sexton. Wit — Michael Wall, John (I his mak) Smith, Nathll (+ his mark) Mitchell, John Wall Jr."

"5 Jun 1743 from Benjamin Harrison of B, to Samuel Wilson of B, for 16 £, a certain tract of land of 238 acres in B on the head of the great Branch of the Nap of Reeds Cr, [and bounded] as by patent granted to the said Benjamin Harrison on 23 Nov 1742. Signed — Benjamin Harrison. Wit — Walter Campbell, John Wall Jr"

"Per B Court order, we, being first sworn by Michael Wall, Gent, on 12 Apr 1744 appraised the slave and personal estate of Joseph Hensley deced. Items mentioned include: 4 old knives and forks, 4 old chairs, 4 old books, Negro men named Hapton and Stafford, 1 Negro boy named Gloucester. Signed — Martha (M her mark) Hensley, adm’x. Signed — Nathaniel Edwards, John Irby, John Wall Jr."

"5 Jun 1744 from James Hicks of B, to George Hicks of B, for 150 £, one certain tract of about 810 acres of land on the north side of Meherrin River in B, being the plantation whereon Capt Robert Hicks formerly lived, and part of 1010 acres of land devised by the will of the said Robert to the said James Hicks, and bounded as by a line of marked trees dividing it from the 200 acre part of the tract which said James has already sold to Benjamin Seawell, and by the several lines dividing the several parcels disposed of by the said Robert Hicks in his life time, together with the respective patent. Signed — James Hicks. Wit — Benja Chapn Donaldson, John Wall Jr, Henry Beddingfeild.."

"1 Jun 1744 from James Hicks of B, to Benjamin Seawell of B, for 16 £, one certain tract of land of about 200 acres, and bounded by the north side of the great branch at James Wych’s path, said Hix, Petway, Farrell, Edwards’ Road, the middle fork of the Schoolhouse branch. Signed — James Hicks. Wit — John Wall Jr, George Hicks, Henry Beddingfeild.."

"25 Jan 1745 from Thomas Hicks of North Carolina, to Nathaniel Ewards of B, for 40 £, all that tract of about 250 acres in St Andrew’s Parish & B on the north side of Meherrin River, & is the lower part of a tract of land containing about 500 acres, whereon Daniel Hicks, late of B at the time of his death, did dwell. Daniel Hicks, in his B will dated 17 Dec 1734, devised the 250 acres to the said Thomas Hicks. Signed — Thomas Hicks. Wit — John Wall Jr, George Hicks, James Hicks Jr, John Irby Jr, Henry Bedingfield, Francis Price."

"3 Mar 1745 from John Carrell of St Andrew’s Parish and B, to William Huff of same, for 6 £, one tract of about 50 acres of land in B, and bounded by Linch’s line on Huff’s Spring Branch, the Country Line, said Huff’s on land. Signed — John Carrell. Wit — John Wall Jr, John Steed."

"An appraisement of the estate of Charles Hix. Items mentioned include: 5 tea cups & saucers, 2 old wigs, 3 old spoons. Total value: 15 £ 15 shillings 4 pence. Errors excepted. Signed — George Hicks, Ad’r. Signed — Batt Peterson, John Wall Jr, Michael Wall Jr."

[Comment: Michael Wall Jr. was probably the son of John Wall Sr., and brother of John Wall Jr. Michael Wall Sr, brother of John Wall Sr did not name a son Michael in his will. In those days the appellation of "Jr." did not necessarily mean "the son of…" It was used to distinguish between the older and younger of two men of the same name, and not necessarily even related.]

"Inventory of the appraisement of the estate of John Jackson deced… Per Court order 1 Jan 1746/7, we, being first sworn by Mr. John Wall Jr and Colo John Wall, have valued all the goods…"

"Will of Thomas Mitchell
Executor: Capt Michael Wall.
Signed 4 Feb 1746/7 — Thomas (+ his mark) Mitchell. Wit — Mich. Wall, John Wall Jr, John (+ his mark) Smith.
At a court held for B on 2 Jul 1747, this will was presented by the exors, and the same was proved by the oath of John Wall Jr, Gent, one of the witnesses…"

"5 Jun 1746 from Isaac House of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to Richard Ransom (Ramsom) of same, for 35 £, one certain tract of about 84 acres of land on the north side of the three Creeks in B, and bounded by the creek a little above the Mill. Signed — Isaac (X his mark) House. Wit — John Wall Jr, James Maclin."

"Lease and Release. 15 May 1746 from David Crawley of Prince George County, mariner, to John Wall the younger of B, Gent, for 60 £, one certain tract of about 240 acres of land on the north side of Meherrin River in B, and bounded by [trees]. The land was patented to David Crawley, the father, deceased, on 18 Feb 1722, and descends to the said David Crawley as heir at law. Signed — David Crawley. Wit — George Wallton, Michael Wall, Richard Ransom, Matthias Davis, John Butler, Walter Campbell. Recorded 4 Sep 1746."

[Comment: Note that this David Crawley was the son of the David Crawley who named John Wall Sr in his will, above. This tends to prove that the John Wall "of Surry County" was, indeed, our John Wall, Senior, of Brunswick County.]

"Inventory and appraisement of the estate of John Irby deced….
Per B Court order, we appraised the estate of Dr. John Irby. Ann Irby, Ex’x. Signed — Nathaniel Edwards, George Hicks, John Wall Jr. Returned to B Court on 3 Sep 1747 and OR."

"5 May 1748 from Jacob Woolsey of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to Benjamin Warren of Surry County, for 100 £, 2 certain tracts of land on the east side of the Great Cr in B, one containing about 397 acres and bounded by the Indian Line on the east side of the Great Cr below Christiana Fort. The land was patented to John Wall Jr on 28 Sep 1728. The other tract containing 238 acres adjoining the 1st tract, is bounded by the creek, being a tract of land that was patented to said John Wall on 1 Feb 1738. Signed — Jacob Woolsey. Wit — John Douglas, John Wall Jr, Michael Rice, Daniel Sears."

"18 Feb 1748 from William Renn of St Andrew’s Parish in B, to Lawrence House of same, for 10 £, one certain tract of about 10 acres of land on the south side of the Otterdam Swamp in B, and bounded by the Rockey branch, said William Renn. The land is part of the tract on which said Renn now lives. Signed — William Renn. Wit — Michael Wall, Robt Campbell, John Wall Jr, Matt: Davis."

"Account Current of the estate of William Morris deced….
Per court order, we inspected the account of the estate, and find it to be true. Certified 6 Jul 1748 — John Wall Jr, George Wyche."

"Will. 27 Jun 1748. I, Richard Ransom of St Andrew’s Parish in B, being sick and weak but of sound memory…
Executors: my trusty friends Colo John Wall and Colo Nath’ll Edwards. And I appoint them, or the survivor of them, to be guardian to my 2 sons, James and Robin, whom I desire they may have bound apprentices when they come to the age of 16. Signed — Richard Ranone. Wit — Saml Bennett, John Wall Jr
At a court held for B on 6 Oct 1748, this will was presented by the exors, who refused to take upon themselves the burden of the execution, and the same was proved by the oath of Samuel Bennett, a witness, and OR. On the motion of the Francis, the widow and relict of the said testator, with John Wall and Nathaniel Edwards, Gent, her securities, entered into and acknowledged bond…"

"Inventory and appraisement of the estate of Richard Ransom dec’d…
Per B Court order, we appraised the estate. Signed 26 Jan 1748 — John Wall Jr, Benja Seawell, George Wyche.."

"1 May 1749 from Thomas Powell Sr of B, planter, to William Powell of B, planter, for divers good causes and for 5 £, one certain tract of land of 100 acres on the north side of Fountains Cr in B, and bounded by the mouth of ‘a bottom as formerly appointed,’ said Thomas Powell’s back line, Samuel Hardin. Signed — Thomas (T his mark) Powell. Wit — John Wall Jr, Dionysius Wright." 

The John Wall family supposedly moved from Brunswick County, Virginia, to old Anson County, North Carolina, in the 1750s, probably after the death of his father. 

[Comment: We know that two of his sons and one daughter did move to N.C., but have absolutely no proof that he moved to N.C., himself. If he was involved in the Indian trade in N.C., as we have theorized above, then he may have kept his home "base" in Virginia, and conducted his trade through his sons, who did move to N.C. He did disappear from the Brunswick records after about 1752, so wherever he was, he was no longer active in Brunswick County military or public affairs.

In Anne Wall Thomas’ The Walls of Walltown she reaches the following conclusion and hypothesis:

˜²™

"On the basis of this seemingly random information it is possible to construct a hypothesis about John Wall I [who married Agnes Moorman and Martha Cole, i.e., the son of the original John Wall of Virginia]. John Wall I’s father, possibly also John Wall, had a sister Mary [see comment above — this author theorizes that Mary was the sister of John Wall of Virginia, not his daughter!]. Perhaps that John brought his young sister to Anson County to marry William Covington. This marriage could have been arranged by the two families back in Virginia. That John may have been married to Ann Poythress. He had at least three children: John William and Nancy (or Ann). The wilderness that he found on the banks of the broad Pee Dee in Anson County may have looked promising to him. At sometime, perhaps after the death of his wife, he brought his young children to Anson County. They may have made frequent trips back to Virginia to visit relatives and/or to attend to business. Or could John Wall have visited his sister Mary Wall Covington, returned to Virginia to give glowing accounts of the great river and the lands to the southwest, and fired the imagination and ambition of his young sons, John and William, who later moved to Anson County? These must remain speculations. None of the Virginia records examined to date have revealed a John, William and Nancy Wall in the same family. No family included a brother and sister, John and Mary Wall whose dates correspond to the dates cited for Mary Wall Covington. No records have been found that prove John Wall, father of John I, was ever a resident of Anson. In fact, only one record has been found that indicates the presence of a Wall in Anson County prior to 1769. That is in the North Carolina Militia Returns, 1754-55. In ‘A List of the Millatery Company Commanded by Capten Andrew Pickens in Anson County’ there appears the name of John Wall, number twenty-two, a single man. John Wall I would have been too young to have served in the militia in 1754-55, so the identity of this militiaman remains unknown."

–w— 

ancy Wall, the presumed daughter of John and Ann Poythress Wall, was born about 1748 and married John Covington on 26 July 1770. She was "‘...a sister of John Wall, Sr. (1746-1831) and Major William Wall (1742-1799), and other brothers and sisters,’ stated Capt. W. I. Everett in his own handwriting." 

[For a continuation of the Wall family lineage, see the Covington family history, Chapter 10.] 

 

 

Notes & References

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60.

White, Eurie Covington, Covington Cousins, p. 35.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60.

Wall Family Folder, Albemarle, Stanly County, North Carolina, library.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, The First Three Hundred Years, 1670-1978, Vol II, p. 2.

"Mial Wall letters, 1926, from copy furnished by Charles N. Dean" — Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, p. 19.

"HEK notes; letter from Charles N. Dean to MWD, 1 Dec 1968" — Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, p. 19.

"Edenton (North Carolina) Post Angel, 10 Sep 1800, p. 4" — Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, p. 20.

"Letter to WAW from Richard Dunn, Lawyers Title Insurance Corp., Richmond, Virginia, 18 Sep 1953" — Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, p. 20.

"Patent Book No. 3, p. 9" — Foley, Louise Pledge Heath, Early Virginia Families along the James River, Vol. II, p. 23.

"P. 76" — Duvall, Rev. Lindsay O., Virginia Colonial Abstracts — Series 2, Vol 6. Records of Prince George County, Virginia, 1666-1719, no page number.

"P. 77" — Duvall, Rev. Lindsay O., Virginia Colonial Abstracts — Series 2, Vol 6. Records of Prince George County, Virginia, 1666-1719, no page number.

"P. 149" — Duvall, Rev. Lindsay O., Virginia Colonial Abstracts — Series 2, Vol 6. Records of Prince George County, Virginia, 1666-1719, no page number.

"P. 163" — Duvall, Rev. Lindsay O., Virginia Colonial Abstracts — Series 2, Vol 6. Records of Prince George County, Virginia, 1666-1719, no page number.

"P. 11" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1710-1713, p. 2.

"P. 151" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1710-1713, p. 18.

P. 1013" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 134.

‘P. 752" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 92.

‘P. 190" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 24.

Boddie, John Bennett, Historical Southern Families, Vol. IV, p. 34.

"Nugent, p. 144" — Kornwolf, James D., Guide to the Buildings of Surry and the American Revolution, p. 189.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. X, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, p. 17.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. X, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, p. 27.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. X, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, p. 55.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. X, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, p. 57.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. X, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, p. 89.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 3.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 9.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 13.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 35.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 35.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 58.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 58.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 70.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 78.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-1661, p. 94.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XI, Charles City County Court Orders, 1655-1658, pp. 102-103.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 3.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 17.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 42.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 42.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 42.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 43.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 52.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, pp. 52-53.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 70.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, pp. 70-71.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XIII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1664-1665, p. 27.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 32.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 51.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 52.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 67.

Fleet, Beverley, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vol. XII, Charles City County Court Orders, 1661-1664, p. 72.

Weisiger, Benjam B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Records 1737-1774, p. 70.

"P. 467" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 157.

"On 3 October 1660, a deed of gift for 2 ewes was made by John Wall ‘unto his son-in-law Charles Clay’ in Charles City County (Fleet, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Vo. 11, Charles City County Court Orders, 1658-61, page 78). The term ‘son-in-law,’ at that date, usually was used for a stepson. It seems probable (from this reference) that the widow of John Clay, and mother of Charles Clay, had married secondly John Wall" — Barnes, Robert, Genealogies of Virginia Families (The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography), Vol. II, p. 79.

Mrs. Mary Rodgers Clay, The Clay Family, The Genealogy of the Clays, pp.66-68.

"P. 182" — Weisiger, Benjam B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Records 1737-1774, p. 70.

"P. 412" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 132.

"P. 423" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 137.

Weisiger, Benjam B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Records 1737-1774, p. 66.

"P. 443" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 145.

"Pp. 445-446" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 146.

"P. 555" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 199.

"P. 560" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 201.

"P. 572" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 206.

"P. 576" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 207.

"P. 583" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 210.

"P. 584" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1687-1695, p. 210.

‘P. 190" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 24.

‘P. 205" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 26.

‘P. 228" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 28.

"Brunswick Wills 1739-1750, p. 48" — provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, CA, in personal correspondence dated 4 Feb 1996

The name "Mary" comes from several deeds where a "Mary" was co-signer with Micheal Wall, including the one dated 5 November 1739 from Marmaduke Johnson to John Chapman in which Michael Wall, Will: McKnight, and Mary Wall were witnesses (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 2, p. 23). "Jones" is surmised from the fact that Michael Wall named his kinsman, Robert Jones, guardian of his children in his will Mary was not named in this will, so she had apparently died by 1749.

"Page 156, Brunswick Wills 1739-1750, p. 48" — provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, CA, in personal correspondence dated 4 Feb 1996

"Patent Book No. 12, p. 508" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 313.

FGS compiled by F. Menger of 4759 Ocean Dr., Corpus Christi, Tex., 78412, and provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California in personal correspondence dated 4 Feb 1996.

‘P. 752" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 92.

"Patent Book No. 10, p. 344" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 196.

"Patent Book No. 10, p. 342" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 195.

"Patent Book No. 10, p. 447" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 216.

"Patent Book No. 11, p. 189" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 244.

"Patent Book No. 13, p. 48" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 321.

"P. 926" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills & Deeds, 1713-1728, p. 122..

"Patent Book 11, p. 40" — Foley, Louise Pledge Heath, Early Virginia Families along the James River, p. 102; "Patent Book 11, p. 40" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 224.

"Patent Book 11, p. 40" — Foley, Louise Pledge Heath, Early Virginia Families along the James River, p. 102.

"Patent Book No. 12, p. 508" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 313.

"Patent Book No. 14, p. 72" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 386.

"Patent Book No. 14, p. 211" — Nugent, Nell Marion, Cavaliers and Pioneers, Vol. III, 1695-1732, p. 399.

Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book, p. 217" — Weisiger, Benjamin B., III, Prince George County, Virginia, Records, 1733-1792, p. 28.

Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book, p. 227" — Weisiger, Benjamin B., III, Prince George County, Virginia, Records, 1733-1792, p. 30.

Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book, p. 276" — Weisiger, Benjamin B., III, Prince George County, Virginia, Records, 1733-1792, p. 42.

Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book, p. 325" — Weisiger, Benjamin B., III, Prince George County, Virginia, Records, 1733-1792, p. 54.

Prince George County, Virginia, Minute Book, p. 235" — Weisiger, Benjamin B., III, Prince George County, Virginia, Records, 1733-1792, p. 33.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 79.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 179.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 146.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 155.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 217.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 266.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 6.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 11.

Neale, Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 35-36.

Neale, Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 38.

Neale, Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 50.

Neale, Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 58.

Neale, Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 84-85.

"P. 4" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 40.

"P. 4" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 40.

"Pp. 5-6" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 40.

"P. 7" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 41.

"P. 11" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 42.

"P. 7" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 41.

"P. 8" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 41.

"P. 12" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 42.

"P. 14" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 43.

"P. 16" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 44.

"P. 19" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 46.

"P. 20" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 46.

"P. 23" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 47.

"P. 28" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), pp. 50-51.

"P. 30" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 51.

"P. 40" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 56.

"P. 42" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), pp. 56-57.

"P. 44" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 57.

"P. 44" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 57.

"P. 48" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 59.

"P. 50" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1894 (Dinwiddie County, Va.) and St. Andrew's Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797 (Brunswick County, Va.), p. 59.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 14.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 15.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 17.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 29.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 39.

"Surry County Deeds, Wills, Etc. #8, 1730-1738, p. 872" — Hopkins, William Lindsay, Surry County, Virginia, Deeds and Estate Accounts, 1734-1755, p. 23.

Brown, Douglas Summers, Sketches of Greensville County, Virginia, 1650-1967, p. 13.

"Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, Wills, Etc., No. 1, 1732-1740)," The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 1, Number 3, July-September 1957, John Frederick Dorman, Ed., p. 126.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 136" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, pp. 13-14.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 6" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 5.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 24" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 9.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 33" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 12.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 160" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 15.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 49" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 16.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 192" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 18.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 272" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 25.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 425" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 38.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 55" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 18.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 70" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 21.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 71" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 21.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 454" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 41.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 93" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 28.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 128" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 39.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, pp. 385-389" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 39.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 153" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 47.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 463" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 46.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 464" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 46.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 466" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, pp. 46-47.

""P. 262" — Weisiger, Benjamin B. III, Prince George County, Virginia, Wills and Deeds, 1710-1713, p. 33

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 21.

"Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, Wills, Etc., No. 1, 1732-1740)," The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 1, Number 3, July-September 1957, John Frederick Dorman, Ed., p. 124.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 28.

"Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, Wills, Etc., No. 1, 1732-1740)," The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 1, Number 3, July-September 1957, John Frederick Dorman, Ed., p. 127.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 30.

T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Court Orders, 1732-1737, p. 38.

"Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, Wills, Etc., No. 1, 1732-1740)," The Virginia Genealogist, Volume 1, Number 4, October-December 1957, John Frederick Dorman, Ed., pp. 164-165.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 331.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 331.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, pp. 376-377.

McIlwaine, H. R., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. IV, 25 Oct 1721 - 28 Oct 1739, p. 399.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 298.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 302.

Hall, Wilmer L., ed., Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. V, 1 Nov 1739 - 7 May 1754, p. 304.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 377.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 380-381.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 413.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 108.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 110.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 111.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 114.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 116.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 117.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 119.

Stanard, William G. and Mary Newton, The Colonial Virginia Register, p. 120.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 405.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 377.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 380-381.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 393.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 405.

Fothergill, Augusta, B., Marriage Records of Brunswick County, Virginia, 1730-1852, p. 125.

"See SSV, Vol. 7, p. 168" — The Southside Virginian, Vol. 8, No. 1, January 1990, p. 32.

"See Southside Virginia Families, John B. Boddie (1955), vol. 1, p. 164" — The Southside Virginian, Vol. 8, No. 1, January 1990, p. 32.

The Southside Virginian, Vol. 8, No. 1, January 1990, pp. 31-32.

The Southside Virginian, Vol. 8, No. 1, January 1990, p. 32. See also Fothergill, Augusta, B., Marriage Records of Brunswick County, Virginia, 1730-1852, p. 55. They were married 4 Mar 1726

"Brunswick County Will Book 3, p. 366" — The Southside Virginian, Vol. 7, No. 3, July 1989, p. 106.

"Extracts from Brunswick County Orphans Book (1740-1781), p. 212 (1764)" — The Southside Virginian, Vol. 9, No. 4, October - December 1991.

"Widow of John (D.B. III; 111" — Fothergill, Augusta B., Marriage Records of Brunswick County, Virginia, 1730-1852, p. 123.

"Land Patent Book 31, Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, Vol. 31, No. 3, Aug 1993, p. 245" — provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California, in a personal correspondence dated 1 Feb 1996.

"Brunswick County Will Book 3, p. 254" — The Southside Virginian, Vol. 7, No. 3, July 1989, p. 105.

Brown, Douglas Summers, Historical and Biographical Sketches of Greensville County, Virginia, 1650-1967, pp. 31-38.

"Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneers III, p. 366 (Patent Book 13, p. 441)" — information on Family Group Sheet provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek.

"Nugent, Cavaliers and Pioneers IV, p. 179 (Patent Book 18, p. 174)" — information on Family Group Sheet provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 303" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 30.

"William Montgomery Clemens (compiler), North and South Carolina Marriages from Earliest Colonial Days to the Civil War (New York: E. P. Dutton, c. 1927) — cited in Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, p. 21.

Wall Family Folder, Albemarle, Stanly County, North Carolina, library.

Family Group Sheet provided by Sandy Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California, in personal correspondence dated 17 Oct 1995.

Family Group Sheet provided by Sandy Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California, in personal correspondence dated 17 Oct 1995.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 84.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 86.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 87.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 91.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 93.

Hopkins, William Lindsay, Bath Parish Register, 1827-1897 of Dinwiddie County, Virginia, and St. Andrews Parish Vestry Book, 1732-1797, of Brunswick County, Virginia, p. 94.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, pp. 510-518" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, pp. 51-54.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 377.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, pp. 380-381.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 405.

Neale, Janet Gay, Brunswick County, Virginia, 1720-1975, p. 393.

Weisiger, Benjam B. III, Charles City County, Virginia, Records 1737-1774, p. 143.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 66" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 8.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 87" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 9.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 89" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 9.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 158" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 15.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 182" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 17.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 201" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 19.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 203" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 19.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 247" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 23.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 286" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 26.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 86" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 26.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 474" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 45.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 2, p. 476" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1740-1745, p. 45.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 141" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 15.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 160" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 17.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 103" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 31.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 128" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 39.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 134" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 41.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 190" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 19.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 215" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 22.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 136" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 42.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 436" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, pp. 43-44.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 547" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 60.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 151" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 46.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 153" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 47.

"Brunswick County Wills, 1739-1750, p. 166" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Wills, 1739-1750, p. 51.

"Brunswick County Deed Book 3, p. 562" — T.L.C. Genealogy, Brunswick County, Virginia, Deeds, 1745-1749, p. 61.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, The First Three Hundred Years, 1670-1978, Vol II, p. 2.

Thomas, Anne Wall, The Walls of Walltown, pp. 22-23.

listed as "Nancy Love" in Sullivan, Mrs. William Henry, Jr., National Society Of The Daughters Of The American Revolution, DAR Patriot Index, Vol. 1, p. 158.

Family Group Sheet provided by Sandy Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California, in personal correspondence dated 17 Oct 1995.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60.

McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60. "Sister of Major William Wall, a commander in the Whig forces in 1771 along the Pee Dee River." — "Richmond County Families," Richmond Post-Dispatch (Rockingham, N.C.), 10 Sep 1953, cited in Thomas, Anne Wa


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