Chapter 14

Epes Family

The Epes family is connected to the Hardyman Family by the marriage of Mary Epes to John Hardyman [Chapter 13] about 1690 in Charles City County, Virginia. The Hardyman family is connected to the Poythress family by the marriage of the daughter (unknown) of John Hardyman to Joshua Poythress [Chapter 12] about 1720 in Prince George County, Virginia. The Poythress family is thought to be connected to the Wall family [Chapter 11] by the marriage of Ann Poythress to John Wall about 1730-1740 in Virginia. The Wall family is connected to the Covington family through the marriage of Nancy Wall to John Covington [See discussion of this confusing "fact" in the Covington family history, Chapter 10] on 26 July 1770. as his second wife. The Covington family is then connected to the Gathings family through the marriage of Martha Wall Covington to James J. Gathings on 5 April 1838. Their daughters, Mattie (Martha Wall Texanna) and Emma Davis Gathings, both married James McCown.

  The name Epes is frequently spelled both as Epes and Eppes in the genealogical literature. The latter is the more common spelling. But since our most authoritative source has chosen the spelling of Epes, I will conform to this usage except where quoting directly from sources that spell it Eppes.

  There is no lack of Epes family histories in the genealogical literature, and I will provide excerpts from some of these in the history to follow. There is one source, however, that stands head and shoulders above the rest, and that is John Frederick Dorman’s Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia. Our Epes family history will start with major excerpts from this source if for no other reason that it is the only one that I have found that traces the family’s roots deep into County Kent, England.

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Epes of County Kent

"The Epes family which descends from Francis Epes I of Virginia, like many other Virginia families, derives from the County of Kent in England. About 1619 ‘William Segar, Garter Principall King of Armes[(1603-1633)] exemplified, ratified, and confirmed The Armes & Creast of the Ancient Family of Epes, of the County of Kent where they have inhabited for many generations’ to the family forever.

The earliest extant reference to the name found so far is a listing of Roger Eppe (Epps) in the Hundred Rolls of 1273. The entry appears under the Hundred of Fourhowe, Norfolk, reading: ‘Before the Leet Court of the Prior of Canterbury [came] Roger Eppe [and three others] of Wytelwode to declare homage for Depham.’ The Hundred Rolls were compiled on order of King Edward I on his return from Palestine.

"In 1409 John Eps and Stephen Eps witnessed a deed of William Scot of the parish of Brabourne in County Kent.Brabourne is five miles east of Ashford and ten miles northeast of Brenzett. The Scots of Scot Hall in Brabourne were also ancient landowners in Brenzett parish.

"William Aps was one of the witnesses to a charter dated 10 July Henry VI [1441] concerning lands in the parishes of Lamberherst and Wadehurst. Lamberhurst is about 20 miles east of Brenzett and Wadehurst is its southern neighbor in Sussex.

"On 5 February 1459 William Aps alias Eps of Lamberdherst alias Lamberherst, County Kent, alias County Sussex, ‘husbondman,’ was summoned to answer Reynold Derlyngton, citizen and fishmonger of London, and William Batalye, abbot of Robertsbridge, touching debts of £10 and £20 respectively. Four years later, on 24 June 1663, Stephen Aps, late of Lamberherst, Sussex, was charged with not appearing before the justices of the Bench to answer a plea that he render £10 to Robert, son of Reginald Derlyngton, late citizen and fishmonger of London, and William Clyfford, citizen and fishmonger of London, the executors of the will of said Reginald, and on 20 November 1464 William Aps, late of Lamberherst, County Kent, ‘husbondman,’ was charged with the same failure.

"There is an entry in the records of the Cinque Ports listing Robert Espe deputy for Rye in 1433, a Bailiff of Yarmouth the same year, and mayor in 1436-37. Richard Epse was a jurat of Rye in 1436. Parnell and Symon Espe of Rye were directed to bring process against Robert Godfray of Folkestone in 1442. Folkestone is eleven miles up the coast from New Romney and one of the detached members of the Cinque Ports.

"Rye, a Cinque Port, adjoins Kent, across the River Rother, in southeastern Sussex, being about six miles from Brenzett. It was largely destroyed in 1448 during a French raid. Most records were then lost. The remaining records of Rye date from 13 December 1448, except for a few fragments and the Cinque Port records.

"The Cinque Ports were originally five seaports on the southeast coast of England. They were Hastings, Romney, Hithe, Dover and Sandwich. Rye and Winchelsea were early added as ‘ancient towns’ with all Port privileges. There were also several detached ‘members,’ of which ‘Lydd’ is a corporate town and Old Romney, Bromhill, Dengemarsh, and Oswardstone were non-corporate members, with the same jurisdiction.

"The Cinque Ports were formed in the eleventh century under the charter of Edward the Confessor, confirmed by William the Conqueror, and first jointly granted liberties by charter by Edward I in 1278. This charter is 99 years older than the Charter of London. The mayors, jurats and members of the House of Commons from the Cinque Ports were called Barons of the Cinque Ports. A jurat of the Cinque Ports was the equivalent of an alderman. The Cinque Ports were first represented in Parliament in 1265. Each Port sent four members.

"The Romney Marsh Corporation was established in 1462. Romney Marsh consists of fifteen parishes. The churches are very ancient and fine. The river Rother, which now has its mouth at Rye Harbor, formerly entered the sea at New Romney until its course was wholly altered during a great storm in 1287. The Romney Marsh Corporation was charged with the proper draining and embanking of the Marsh. The contiguous parishes, Brenzett, Old Romney, New Romney, and Lydd, are all within the liberties of Romney Marsh or the Cinque Ports. The ancient channel of the Rother was embanked on the southwest side by the Rhee (River) Wall and on the northeast side by the Marsh Wall. The sixty-one acres between the walls from Brenzett to New Romney were granted to New Romney by Queen Elizabeth I.

"Romney Marsh and the Kent Cinque Ports are ecclesiastically within the Diocese of Cantebury and civilly within the Eastern Division of Kent and the Lathes of Shipway and Saint Augustine.

"The earliest proved ancestor of Francis Epes I of Virginia was Alan Epes of Brenzett, County Kent, England. Brenzett is partly within the liberty of the town and port of New Romney and therefore within the liberty of the Cinque Ports. A portion of the northern part of the parish, north of the Rheewall, is within the liberty of the Corporation of Romney Marsh.

"The earlier family connection of Alan Epes are unknown but the names he gave to his children suggest a close relationship to several other members of the family.

"The will and testament of William Eps of the parish of St. Mary in the Marsh, about four miles east of Brenzett, dated 7 April 1473 and proved 10 May 1473, named his wife Johane and sons Robert and John. In a deed dated 10 June 1487 Robert Eps of Ivychurch, Kent, which is two miles east of Brenzett, granted to his brother John Eps, the younger, of Ivychurch, a pasture of seven acres in the parish of Brenzett.

"The will of John Eps of Ivychurch, dated 21 October 1489 and proved 27 January 1489/90, named his brothers John and Robert Eps. John Eps of Ivy Church was admitted to the freedom of Old Romney on 12 June 1488.

"A Stephen Epse was decennarious (collector of tithes) and jurat for Old Romney in 1522. Stephen Appes of Goodherst left a will, dated 2 February 1546 [1546/6] and proved 6 April 1546, which directed that he be buried in the churchyard there, named his wife Agnes, sons James (executor with Agnes), Robert and William and daughters Julian, Elizabeth, Catherine, Dennys, Alice and Margaret, and mentioned land called Boodes. That he also had a son Stephen is established by papers filed in a suit of 1570:

"May 11 Eliz. (1570). Bill by Robert Aps of Estergate, Sussex, husbandman, and Answers by James Aps and William Pate. Stephen Aps, the father of James (defendant), Robert (plaintiff), William and Stephen Aps, was a husbandman of Goodhurst, Kent, and died seized of 49 acres in Goodhurst, which descended to his sons. Of these William Aps died without issue, having conveyed his share in the property to James Aps. Stephen Aps, the son, conveyed his share to William Pate." 

"To be buried in churchyard of St. Enswithe de Brenzete. To Johanne my daughter. To Robto my son. To each of my sons and daughters.

"Will. Uppon a feoffment made to Thomas atte Reche and Willm Benet of Brenzete his feoffees of all the land and tenements in Brenzett or elsewhere. Benet his wife. Robert his son, when 14. To John his eldest son when 14. Daughters Joan and Agnes. To William his youngest son.

"His wife Benet (or Benedicte) ____ has not been identified further.

"Issue:

"1. John Epes, married (1) Margaret ____ and (2) Johane _____

"2. Robert Epes, born after 1457

"3. Johanne Epes

"4. Agnes Epes, perhaps married James Huggelyn and had daughter Agnes to whom John Epes made a bequest.

"5. William Epes, born after 1457" 

John Epes of old Romney, Kent, was born after 1457 since he was under the age of 14 when his father made his will. He was a jurat for Old Romney in January 1520/1, along with his son John, Junior, and is probably the John mentioned as jurat in July 1521 without other designation. His will, made 3 December 1524 as John Eps the elder of the Parish of St. Clement, Old Romney, and proved 8 February 1525/6, provided:

"To be buried in the church in the Aysle part before the Rood. To high altar of St. Martens in New Romney and to high altar of St. Laurence of New Romney. To each of my godchildren 12 pence. To John Epse my godson of Yvechurche, ewes. To Alice Roger my daughter. To John Epps my son. Joan Epps my wife. Agnes, Elizabeth, Cicely and John the children of John Roger. John Garrard my daughter Agnes’ son. Agnes Huggelyn, the daughter of James Huggelyn. Joan my daughter, Anne my daughter, when they reach the age of discretion. Residue to John Epse my son. To Elizabeth Roger.

"Will. Youngest daughters Johane, Amye, Johane when 20. A parcell of land and 16 Acres called Long beche, and the barn with 4 acres lying there, 7 Acres of Land called Brettes, 13 Acres of Land called Daddes, 7 Acres of Land called quarterlandes, 6 ½ Acres of Land which I late purchased of John Arnell. 20 shillings yearly to John for rent, Alice and John Roger to have tenement and garden where they now dwell at rent of 2 shillings to John for their lives. 22 Acres of Land in Hope All Hallows called Seven hay that is to say to the Lands of Allsouls College of Oxenford towards the West and to the land of Richard Hall to the east. Land in Old Romney, St. Martens and St. Laurence, New Romney, Hope, Brookland and Brenzett.

"An undated inscription in St. Clement’s Church names John Ips and his wife Margaret.

"Issue:

"1. John Epes, married Alice ____

"2. Alice Epes. She married John Roger.

"3. Agnes Epes. She married John Garrard.

"4. Johane Epes

"5. Anne Epes

"6. Amye Epes

"7. Joan Epes" 

John Epes described himself as John Epse of the Parish of St. Clement, Old Romney, Kent, in his will dated 15 January 1526/7 and proved 1 February 1526/7, and provided: 

"To be buried in the church at the foot of my father. To High Altar of Old Romney and of St. Martins and St. Lawrence. To the celyng of the rode lofte of Old Romney. To buying of a new crosse for Old Romney Church. To Joan my daughter, under the age of 20, 20 marks. Alys my wife and the children, Alys Roger my sister, Agnes Roger. John Roger son of John Roger. Elizabeth Roger, John Garrard, my sister’s son. John Epse of Ivy church. Reserve to William Epse, Aleyn Epse, John Epse, Thomas Epse and John Epse my sonnes. To wife of John Garrard the younger. John Roger the elder.

"Will. A feoffment made unto Wm Epse, Aleyn Epse, John Epse, William Mersche. John Whatman and Edwarde Clarke. Alys my wife. All sons under 21. Lands late purchased of Henry Husbarne. My two sones Thos. Epes and John Epes the younger. Stone to be layed upon my grave to be in pictored with me, my wyffe and all my children. John Epps the elder shall have a mare of the age of 12 years to be delivered to him at 14 years.

"His arms were described in the pedigree given by the Godfrey family of the adjoining parish of Lydd in the Herald’s Visitation of 1619-21.

"John Epes married Alice ____ who, as of the Parish of St. Clement, Old Romney, Kent, left a will dated 2 February 1526/7 and proved 3 June 1527, which provided:

"To be buried in the Church of St. Clement, Old Romney, before our lady. To Johane my daughter my part of the house hold and kyne and vealves. Wm. Warshe shall have the use of her to the time of her marriage, at 18 she to receive the cattle, at 12 she shall receive the profit of the cattle. To Thomas Tyseherste’s wyffe. To my sister of Lydd. To my others sisters. To John Tyseherste my other god son. To my sister of Lydde my best kertyll. To my mother Epse my best gown. To my sister Margarete my kertle next the best. To Joanne Epse my goddaughter my red kertle. To Tyseherste’s wife my black kertle. To Lawrence Arnarde’s wife two petticoats now on my body. To Joan shever (?) best petticoat. To Alyn my son two calves. To the elder John two calves. To Thomas a calf. To either of my children 4 pence. Rest to William my son and he to be Executor. If Joan my daughter die before 16, John Epse my elder son shall have half of the kine, the rest to be divided among my children. Witnesses: Sir Robert Brache, Jurratt, and Edward Clacke.

"She undoubtedly wrote her will immediately after her husband’s death and died four months later.

"Issue:

"1. William Epes, born before Jan 1506/7, may be the William Epps, who was town warden for Dover in 1538 and chamberlain in 1539 and 1545. He was a member of the first four Parliaments of Queen Elizabeth I in 1558, 1563, 1571 and 1572. He was a jurat, was mayor nine times, in 1564-65, 1568-69, 1570-71, 1572-73, 1574-75, 1575-76, when succeeded by his nephew Thomas Epes, 1577-78 and 1578-79, and was Speaker of the ‘General Brodhulle’ of the Cinque Ports held at new Romney on 22 July 1572. William Southlande, who became mayor in 1580-81 and was apparently the leader of an opposing faction of New Romney, brought charges against the Epes faction and supporting jurats, attempting to disfranchise them. An appeal to the General Brotherhood of the Cinque Ports in July 1581 resulted in their exoneration and eventual reelection of Thomas Epes as mayor in 1581-82.

[Comment: As a footnote to the last, the author included the following full text of the appeal of William Epes:

"Whereas diverse disorders and dicentions have risen of late betwixte the maior of Newe Romeney that now is, and several of his brethern lately assistant in justice with others of the corporation of the said towne of Newe Romeney by means whereof some greate disorders and abuses have risen and growne within the said towne to the greate displesure of Almyghtie God, to the greate damage in the quiett government of the said towne and greatlie preiudiciall to the liberties of the Sinq Ports and their members by reason that the Charters, Customlles, customes and usages as well of the siad towne of Romeney as of the Sinq Ports have byn showed to the lawiers of this Realme at large not of councell with the Sinq Ports. A matter very pernicious to the present estate of the Sinq Ports, and more daingerous to our posteritie in time to come if the same in tyme … not be provided for and whereas amongst other things happened within the said towne of New Romeney by the … aforesaid one William Epps, Thomas Epps, Roberte Thurbarne and Thomas Plomer, four of the late jurates of the said towne have not onlie byn putt from their dignitie or office of juratshipp, but also disfanchised from the liberties and privaliages of the said towne without any such lawful course therein had as they … forenamed. Whereof therein to be had they have offered their supplication to this worshipful house … And for that [they] the said William Epps, Thomas Epps, Roberte Thurbarne and Thomas Plomer in their said bill of complaint suppose themselves to be iniured chiefle by William Sowthlond nowe maior of the said towne of New Romney and some others … Wherefore this worshipful assmeblie deliberatelie wayenge the compainte of the plaintiffs and the allegacions of the defendants do iudicially adiudge in manner and form following:

"Firstly for that the said William Epps being of late maior of the towne of Romeney with conscent of some of the jurats of the said towne without conscent of the doialtie of the said towne did give to one Richard Bunting catlie electe baliffe to Yarmouth the sum of £5 being pcell of the money of the chamber of the towne of New Romeney. With the said William Epps and others concenting with him did verilie believe they might lawfull do which indeed by such laws they may not well do therefore it is adiudyde and finally decided that the said William Epps before the feast of the announceation of our lady next or else his executors or assiyn shall pay or cause to be paid to the Chamberlain of the said towne of Romeney for the tyme being the sum of £3. 6s. 8d. cell of the said sum of £5 and the jurats concenting there unto shall pay to the Chamberlains of Romeney aforesaid 33s. 4d. before the said feast by equal portions among them and for that it [is] manifestilly apparent to this worshipful assemblie that £4. 10s. lately given by the said William Epps late maior of Romeney with the conscent of some of the jurats therto theyme poore inhabitants of the said towne of New Romeney was given for a reasonable and charitable consideration and for that they authoretive of the maior and jurat being twoe of the principal branches of the corporations aforesaid for the ought not absolutely be abroyatee therefore aforewell for the consideration aforesaid for the … other causes it is adjudget that the said William Epps and the jurats with him herein consenting forever hereafter shall be discharged and by no means chargeable with the said £4. 10s. nor any part thereof and where as it is evident to this assemblie that the counterpanes of certain billetts of 4 several 15’s hereto so granted to his m[ajes]tie did come to the possession of the said William Epps and Thomas Epps in the tymes of their several maioralties and for the said William Epps being a man unlearned yett of grave years and goode credit doth take it uppon his conscience that he knoweth not where the counterpans of the said billetts by become excepte they were putt into one of the chestes which kepethe the Recordes of the saide towne of Romeney. Therefore it is adminstered and finally decided that for the said counterpans of the said billetts the said William Epps shall be exonerated for ever, and that the said Thomas Epps dothe acknowledge that the counterpans of some billetts be in his possession, therefore it is ordained that the said Thomas Epps shall deliver to the maior and jurat of New Romeney for the tyme being before the feast of St. Bartholomew appostler next coming, or such counterpane of billets as be in his possession and further for that it is alleged William and Thomas received the surplusage of the fifteenths during their mayoralties and kept these to their own use believing they had a right to them since this is not so, William shall pay £5 and Thomas £4. 10s. to the Chamberlaine but without mayoral authority, which is thought by the mayor and others to be againste lawe and right tendinge to the mayntenaunce of disorders, broyles and outrages. Although the custumal allows this act, it is not approved of by the assembly, but since most of the 19 are of good name they shall pay the usual fee for their freedoms and the mayor, jurats and commonalty shall enfranchise them. William and Thomas Epps, Robert Thurbarne, Thomas Plomer being ‘the principall actors’ in the making of the 19 freemen were displaced and disenfranchised by the mayor, William Southland, but that being insufficient reason for their disenfranchisement they are to be readmitted as jurats. All strife and controversy is to cease between the parties and any law suits pending are to be withdrawn before Bartholomewtide.

"Anyone breaking any of these orders and proved so at the next Brotherhood shall be ‘reputed and taken thorowe out the Cinque Portes and their members to be very fectious, seditious and contencious person and not worthy to be a member in any Christian Common Wealth …’ and to be absolutely disenfranchised and never received again. Any ambiguities of difficulties must be considered by the Brotherhood and no where else.]

"His dogs were registered by the town in 1580. As William Eps, the elder, of New Romney, Kent, jurat, he left a will dated 25 February 1580/1 and proved 25 November 1581, which provided:

"To be buried in chancel of parish church of St. Nicholas before my seat. To repair of said church ¾. To poor of said town 20/-. To poor of old Romney 10/-. To William Epps son of William Epps late of New Romney aforesaid deceased bedstead etc. in great chamber over great parlour in Old Romney, at 21 or if he die before, same to John Epps uncle of said William Epps or if then dead to Thomas Epps or his eldest son. To Margery Smythe wife of Thomas Smythe of Old Romney a cow. To Abacue Thomas nag I bought of Edmund Glover. To William Epps of Old Romney son of Thomas Epps 6 stocks of bees. To John Epps son of said Thomas 4 stocks of bees. To William Tallis of Wichurch 2 stocks. To said Margery Smithe 3 stocks. To John Baker of Brockland 2 stocks. To Thomas Epps featherbed etc. To my servant John Young for wages and what I owe him £13.6.8. If he be not paid he may take gelding I bought of Anthony Fagge and another I had from my brother Thomas Epps. Rest of goods to be sold. Thomas Epps and John Epps son of my brother Allen Epps to be executors. To my executor John Epps frame of a house in a barn in occupation of Kennelline Digby.

"Will of lands in Kent.

"To Thomas Epps of New Romney my principal tenement wherein I dwell and another where Peter Lancaster dwells, in New Romney aforesaid and 2 acres in parish of Hope late bought of Robert Quested and 12 acres of marshland late bought of Mayor Jurat and Commonalty of New Romney, in parish of St. Nicholas, New Romney aforesaid and 2 acres in said parish in occupation of John Ayers and 61 acres of marshland in Dimchurch and Burmarsh late bought of Peter Mapesden and 31 acres of marshland in Old Romney and St. Nicholas, New Romney, late bought of John Robyns, of Lidd and 8 acres of marshland in St. Martens Pountney late bought of John Quilter as appears by deed made by me to said Thomas Epps wherein John Edolf and Wilcok gent. Be feoffers. Also to said Thomas Epps 2 acres and a barn in New Romney aforesaid late bought of Gregory Holton, said 2 acres and barn in fee. To John Epps son of my brother Allen Epps tenement, barn and kitchen and 9 acres of marshland in Old Romney in occupation of Kenellnie Digby ‘person’ of Old Romney aforesaid and another tenement or barn and 8 acres in Old Romney in occupation of Thomas Smithe and a tenement and ½ acre in said parish in occupation of James Fries and 31 acres of marshland in said parish in occupation of Robert Thurbarne and John May and tenement and barn and 20 acres in Wichurch in occupation of William Tallis and 52 ½ acres of marshland in said parish in the Yokes in occupation of Robert Thurbarne as by deed made by said William Epps wherein William Lovelace sergeant at law, John Stringer and Richard Glover are feoffees saving one acre in said 8 acres in occupation of said John Smithe late bought of John Fetiplace knight which I likewise give to said John Epps in fee. To John Epps son of my brother Thomas Epps a little tenement in said parish in occupation Allen dister and 3 parcels of land (10 a.) in said parish in occupation of said John Epps and 17 acres in St. Nicholas New Romney late bought of Gregory and George Odyam gent. And 81 acres of marshland in a place called the Breck in parish of Old Romney and Midley in occupation of said John in fee as by deed by me made to said John wherein John Boys Esq, Robert Thurbarne and Thomas Epps are feoffees. To William Epps son of my brother Thomas Epps my principal messe Granding on the high cross in Old Romney, a kitchen etc., 3 acres in occupation of Thomas Smythe, a tenement etc. and 15 ½ acres in Old Romney and St. Martins Pountney in occupation of Thomas Smythe, Thomas Howes and me. A little tenement and ½ acre between the Walles in said parish in occupation of John Hilles and a barn called Popes Barn and 5 acres in Old Romney late bought of Joan Meroke late widow of William Meroke and 7 acres bought of William Meroke and 7 acres late bought of Godly Mercer in Old Romney and St. Martins Pountney in New Romney in occupation of said Thomas Smithe also certain piece of land, 28 acres, in St. Martins Pountney in occupation of Thomas Smythe and late bought of William Quilter and his wife Joan and 17 acres of marshland in said parish and adjoining said 38 (?28) acres late bought of John More gent. And Godly Mercer and 21 acres of marshland in St. Martins Pountney late bought of George Bingham gent. and his wife Ann, now in occupation of said William in fee. To William Epps son of William Epps late of New Romney deceased 2 closes in New Romney bounding on John Stringer sen. And the Queen’s High Way in occupation of Robert Bolland and Thomas Sharpe and 61 acres called Court Lease in Midley, Old Romney and St. Martins Pountney in occupation of Robert Thurbarne and 15 ½ acres in Yokes in parish of St. Martins Pountney late bought of William Quilter and his wife Joan bounds to the lands of the said William Epps West and to land of me West and to lands of the heirs of Roger Horne gent. North and to lands of John Sturgell, John Stringer and lands of said William Epps East and to Kings High Street leading from Old Romney to Wichurch, South, now in occupation of me and of William Epps of Old Romney, also 4 ½ acres in St. Martins Pountney within lands of said William Epps late bought of William Quilter and his wife Joan and 10 acres called Bretts Hoodes in Old Romney wereof 6 acres called Bretts is in occupation of William Epps of Old Romney and 4 acres called Hoodes in occupation of Thomas Howes of Old Romney, to said William Epps in fail male but if he die before 24 s[ine] p[role] m[ale] then same to Thomas Epps and John Epps his uncles in fee equally, they to pay my debts therewith till said William is 21. If said William be not satisfied with accounts concerning payment of debts etc. of said William his father according to Will of his said father then said John Epps shall retain profits till said William duly discharge said John concerning payment of debts. To Richard Epps of New Romney and his wife Agnes a half of a tenement and close in New Romney in occupation of William Clarke, for their lives. The other half to my executors for said lives for maintenance of said tenement. Remainder of said tenement to William Epps of New Romney for fee. To John Epps son of Allen Epps aforesaid tenement, barn etc. in occupation of Henry Cole bought of Oliver Darbishire and a half of 12 acres late bought of Robert Pell of New Romney and 3 acres in Hope late bought of Richard Barwicke in occupation of John Thurbarne and 3 acres bought of Richard Bunting in Hope aforesaid in fee. 9 acres in Old Romney in occupation of Mathewe Gorreham whereof 5 acres lie in Manifolds sometime Whatmans and the other 4 acres lie at Walgate sometime Quilters, which 9 acres if profits my land before bequeathed will not pay my debts and legacies I will said Thomas and John Epps shall sell for that purpose and rest thereof to said Thomas and John Epps in fee. Thomas Smyth to hold the tenement and lands now in his occupying till Mich[aelma]s 1582 at £64 yearly rent. To said Arthur Bee house, barn etc in New Romney in the High Street in his occupation, in fee, also all debts due to me from him. To Agnes Walles wife of said Peter Walles deed of feoffment I have of tenement wherein said Peter now dwell. Witness, John Brdgman, John Pix, Edward Fowle, Abacue Thomas.

"The court rolls of Old Langport Manor report that the Steward recorded that William Eppes, senior, had died since 3 October 1581, and that his brothers Allen Eppes’ and Thomas Eppes’ sons were his heirs. He apparently was unmarried and left no issue.

"2. Alan Epes, married Agnes ____ Harle.

"3. John Epes, born after 1513/4, married 27 Feb 1540/1 at Old Romney Joane Browne. He left a will dated 8 Nov 1544 which provided:

"Being whole of mind and sick in [body omitted], to be buried in the Church of Christ dedicate in the honour of Christ and Saint Clement of Old Romney. To the high altar for my tithes and fferings megligently[?] forgotten, 8 d. To Jone my wife, in ready money, £20, with all the household stuff. The residue of my moveables to remain to the use of Margaret, my daughter. My lands to remain to Henry, my son. My brother Will Epse to have the oversight of my children, and to be my executor, to dispose for my soul as he shall seem most expedient and best. Witnesses: Edwarde Clache, Johan Andrue the wife of Johan [i.e., John], Margaret Wygge, widow.

"He was buried 9 November 1544 at Old Romney.

"4. Joan Epes, born after February 1514/5, was buried 10 June 1556 at Lydd. She married Peter Godfrey who was possessed of a mansion and estate called Nod, in Midley, and a moiety of the manor of Finches in Lydd, died 10 March 1566/7 at Lydd, son of Thomas Godfrey (died 1542).

"5. Thomas Epes, born 1522, jurat, buried 22 October 1580 at Old Romney leaving will dated 19 October 1580 and proved 14 December 1580, which provided:

"Being sick in body, to be buried in the Church of Old Romney. I give and bequeath toward the reparation of the said Church of Old Romney 6s 8d. To Thomas Sharpe, William Dister [sic], John Andrewe and Margaret Diste [sic] and to either of them 3s 4d. To John Hilles, carpenter, 3s 4d. To Thomas ffrowde, my godson, 6s 8d. To Willia Bennet, my godson, 2s. To John Eppes, my son, one joined beadstead and one plain bedstead [and many other similar bequests]. To Willia’ Eppes, my son, my featherbed next the best, and my bolster next the best [and similar bequests including one chest that was his mother’s]. My executor shall pay to Thomasin Eppes, my daughter, £50 10s, whereof there is paid to already £20, and the other £30 10s to be paid to her or her assigns at the Feast of All Saints in the year 1581 [also a featherbed, etc., including one chest that was her grandmother’s]. To my daughter Joane, wife of John Baker of Brookland, £10 and one silver spoon, and the said £10 to be paid to her or her assigns within one year & three quarters next after my decease … upon condition that the said Joane my daughter do make unto John Eppes my son a sufficient acquittance and discharge for all gifts, legacies and duties given unto her by the will of Margaret Clariche, her grandmother. [If she die before,] then I will the said £10 to the children of my said daughter Joane, upon condition that they likewise acquit my executor as is beforesaid … To Mary my daughter, the wife of Thomas Wattes, £7, to be paid to her or her assigns within 2 years and a half[?] next after my decease, upon condition that she do likewise acquit my executor of and for all gifts due her by the will of Margaret Clariche, her grandmother. [If she die before,] then I will the said £7 to the children of my said daughter. To my daughter Susan, the wife of Willia Talleis, £20, upon condition that she do make a sufficient acquittance to discharge my executor for and concerning all gifts due to her by the will of Margaret Clariche, her grandmother, of the which I will £10 to be paid to her within one quarter of a year next after my deceease, the other £10 I will shall be then also paid, if so that Willia Tallies, her husband, will be bound to my sons William and John Eppes, with sufficient sureties to leave the said Susan his wife £30 if she shall overlive him, and if it shall fortune my said daughter Susan to die before the said Willia, her husband, then he to leave to his children of the said Susan begotten £20. But if the said Willia cannot put in sufficient bond, I will the said £10 shall remain in the hands of my said sons, and they to pay to him for the profit thereof yearly 20s, until the eldest child of the said William & Susan shall come to the age of 15 years, and then the said £10 to be indifferently divided amongst their children, and paid to them as they shall come to their said several ages of 15 years. But if the said Susan overlive the said Willia her husband, then I will that my sons Willia and John Eppes shall pay to the said Susan my daughter the said £10 remaining in their hands, within one quarter of a year next after the decease of the said William, her husband … To Ailce my daughter, the wife of Richarde Squyre, £10 … upon condition that the said Richarde will be bound to Willia & John Eppes, my sons, to leave my daughter Ailce, his wife, worth £40 in money and money worth, as she shall like of, if she overlive him; the said £10 to be paid within 3 years next after my decease. [If she died before], the said £10 to the children of the said Ailce my daughter … if … the said Richard Squier die before the said 3 years be expired … my said son John Epps shall pay the said £10 to the said Ailce my daughter within one quarter of a year next after the death of the said Richarde. To the said Ailice my daughter one table & a form, which are in the house of Bollandes [etc.] … To the 6 children of John Baker of Brookland, my son in law, to every of them 6s 8d, to be paid within 3 years next after my decease, and if any of them die, then the one to be the other’s heir. To 4 children of Thomas Wattes, my son in law, to every of them 6s 8d, to be paid within 3 years next after my decease, and if any of them die, one to be another’s heir. To 3 children of Willia Tallies, my son in law, to every of them 6s 8d, to be paid within 3 years next after my decease, and if any of them die, one to be another’s heir. To the child of Richard Squyre, my son in law, 6s 8d, to be paid to him at the age of 4 years [sic!], and if the said child die before the said 4 years be expired, then I will the said 6s 8d to the next child of my daughter Ailice then living. To Abraham Breache, my servant, over and above his wages, 5s, to be paid within one month next after my decease. To Elizabethe, my servant, likewise over and above her wages, 5s, to be paid to her within one month next after my decease. To Thomasyn Eppes the best christening sheet that was her mother’s, and the third tablecloth. To Susan Eppes, my daughter, my christening sheet next the best. To Ailice, my daughter, the third christening sheet. The residue of all my linen, woollen, money, and my gelding - my debts & legacies being paid, and all my funeral charges and other necessary expenses discharged - I will and give to William and John Eppes, my sons, equally to be divided between them, upon condition that my son William do make to my son John Eppes an acquittance for the discharge of the legacy and bequeath of my mother Clariche given to him. I make executor of this my present Testament and last will Willia Eppes, my brother.

"(Last will & Testament) concerning my lands & tenements. To William Eppes, my son, and to his heirs for ever, 17 acres of land, be they more or less, lying and being in the parish of Hope, and now in the occupation of the said Willia, my son; also … 12 acres and a half of land lying and being in the said parish of Hope, whereof 3 ½ acres are in the occupying of Richard Squyer, and the other 9 acres are in the occupying of John Eppes, my son, and renteth to the Court of Weeke; also … 6 acres of land, be it more or less, lying at the Five Wentes & in the parish of St. Martyn’s in New Romney, and now in the occupying of the said John Eppes; also … one tenement between the Walls, now in the tenure & occupying of William Pickle. To John Eppes, my son, my tenement with all the building thereto belonging, set, lying and being in the parish of Hope, and 13 acres of land, be it more or less, in the said parish of Hope, and now in the tenure and occupying of Richard Squyre and the said John Eppes, to have and to hold the said tenement and lands to the said John Eppes and his heirs forever; also … 18 acres of land, be they more or less, lying at the Five Wentes and in the parish of St. Martyn’s in New Romney; also … 8 acres of land more or less, lying at the said Five Wents … and in the occupying of my said son John … Witnesses: Kenelme Digby, Parson of Old Romney; Thomas Smythe; Stephin Bechinge; John May, ‘wth other.’ Probate, by the oaths of Thomas Smythe, Stephen Bechinge and John Maye, granted to the executor named in the will.

"He married 91), 25 January 1544/5, Ellen Browne who was buried there 27 January 1567/8, and (2) Joan _____ who was buried in May 1573 as wife of Thomas Epes, jurat. 

"Alan Epes was a jurat and was bailiff of Lydd, Kent, in 1544-45. Lydd is two and half miles south of Old Romney in Denge Marsh and in the Manor of Old Langport, Lydd, and is a member of the Town and Port of New Romney and one of the original detached members of the Cinque Ports. Among the accounts of John Oyne, Sr., and Thomas Harle, wardens of the parish of Lydd in 1544-45, is an entry:

"Received from Alen Eps, the Bailiff, for the money called Light Silver, collected by him and others at Christmas for the sustentation of the Church £9 3s. 6d.

"The will of Alen Epse of Lyd, Kent, jurat, dated 30 July 1551 and proved 22 September 1551, provided: 

"To be buried in the churchyard at Lyd. To my maidservant Agnes Aton a heiffer. To my servant Nicholas Aton a heiffer. To my servant Simon Wynday heiffer and sheep. To my servant Thomas Smythe 2 sheep. To my servant John Rolffe 2 sheep. To my servants Richard Aukyn and Robert Adams sheep. To my maidservants Alice Hollye and Julian Raynolde sheep. To John Wynday sheers and debts he owes me. To Robert Dyne all debts he owes me. To my daughters Johane Epse, Alyce Epse and Margery Epse £20 a piece at 18 or marriage. To my wife’s daughter Elizabeth Harle £10. To my wife Agnes Epse oxen, £15, household stuff in tenement I now dwell in etc. Rest of my moveable goods to my sons William Epse, Thomas Epse & John Epse equally. Said son William Epse to be executor. Thomas Strogle, John Strogle & my brother Thomas Epse to be overseers. Witness Thomas Strogle, jurate, Robert Dyne, John Wynday.

"Will (of lands) To my wife Agnes my principal tenement I now dwell in for life remainder to my three sons William, Thomas & John equally in fee. To said three sons rest of my lands in Lyd aforesaid, Old Romney, St. Martins Pounteney & Brenset or elsewhere in Kent in fee. To my wife my term of years in the Brokes called the Grate Brokes & my term of years in the 14 acres called Mr. Feteplace brokes, behind the watercourse on the backside of my house which I hold to farm of Mr. Feteplace. To my son William Epse half of my term of years in my manor called newe Land which I hold of Mr. Feteplace. To my sons Thomas Epse & John Epse the other half thereof. Said son William Epse to have occupying of all my lands above to said Thomas & John his brethren bequeathed till they are 17. Same Witnesses and Thomas Carpenter.

"He married Agnes (_____) Harle who by her earlier marriage had a daughter Elizabeth Harle. She married (3), 3 August 1552, William Buthow at All Saints Church, Lydd.

Issue:

"1. Johane Epes, possibly ‘my sister Tookyes’ mentioned in the will of John Epes.

"2. Alyce Epes, born 1546, buried 24 Feb 1560

"3. William Epes described himself as of Canterbury, yeoman, when he made his will 2 March 1573/4, proved 12 November 1578, in which he provided:

"At my funeral, a sermon 40/- to poor. To poor of Old Romney 20/-. To my wife Anne £10 a year out of my lease lands I have of John Fetiplace Esq. At Mydley & Lydd, for unexpired term if she so long live, she not to claim dower of other lands and make a release to my son and deliver same to my said (sic) uncle and brother John, and she to make conveyance of her estate in my other lands and goods to my said son. To my wife, all household stuff in Canterbury. To my brother John Eps horse. To my brother Thomas Eps horse. To my sister Margery 20/- a year for life. To my son William Eps in fee all my lands and to him my leases and things and he to be executor. He to have no dealings with the land during his minority but my uncle William Eps of New Romney jurat and my brother John Eps of the Middle Temple to have his bringing up till 21 and all his lands. If my uncle William Eps died before my son be 21, my lands etc. to my said brothers John and Thomas in fee and lease land that John Stringer, demised to me by John Fetiplace Esq., now occupies by my grant, containing 100 acres, to my said brother John Eps, paying his part for the farm thereof and I do now to said John Fetiplace, about 2/- an acre, and also paying £6.13.4 a year, part of said £10 to my wife. The 50 acres which John Andersonne occupies being the least of the said lease lands, to my brother Thomas, paying my wife 5 marks for life if lease continued and his part to said John Fetiplace.

"He was buried 13 January 1577/8 at New Romeny. He married 7 February 1563/4 at Maidstone, Kent, Anne Greene.

"4. Alyn Epes, baptized 7 November 1542, buried 21 July 1544 at Lydd.

"5. Thomas Epes, baptized 10 April 1544, a jurat and mayor of New Romney, 1576-77, succeeding his uncle William Epes, 1581-82 and 1583-84. The factional dispute (referred to under William Epes) after the third election of Thomas as mayor, lead to an appeal to the Privy Council which resulted in an order, 27 March 1584, when Thomas was again mayor, designed to insure the peace of the Corporation. He married (1), 16 August 1572, Maria Stuppeny, who died circa 1580, daughter of Lawrence Stuppeny. A court action instituted by her son in 1606 related to her inheritance:

"Plaintiff Allen Eppes of Ashford, gent. William Marsh of Old Romney owned a house and 63 acres there which by his will of 1540 he devised to Lawrence Stuppeny or, if he died before reaching the age of 21, to his brother, Clement Stuppeny. Before Lawrence Stuppeny could take possession he died, leaving an only child, Mary. Clement Stuppeny, taking advantage of the minority of the said Mary, entered upon the property and took possession of the deeds. Mary Stuppeny came of age and, some 35 years ago, married Thomas Eppes who had issue William Eppes and the plaintiff. Thomas and Mary Eppes died about 23 or 24 years ago when the disputed premises should have come to the said William and Allen. The said William Eppes died overseas about three years ago and the plaintiff is his her. (Bill undated.)

"November 1606. Clement Stuppeny answers that the property was owned by Edward Clache and Henry Smyth who, on 5 February 29 Henry VIII, conveyed it to William Marsh who, in turn conveyed it to Lawrence Stuppeny by deed of 5 June Ed. VI.

"Thomas married (2), circa 1582, Frances Bleckenden, who married (2) Nicholas Robinson, Gent., of Monkton, and (3) John Bleckenden of Aldington and died 1611, aged 48, leaving children of all three marriages. His will, made as Thomas Epps of New Romney, co. Kent, jurat, dated 14 April 1585 and proved 12 June 1585, provided:

"To my wife Frances bedstead in chamber over the iner Hall etc. To Ann Epps daughter of my brother William Epps deceased £40 out of my lands within 7 years. To my sister Margery Smithe 10/-. To her children 10/- a piece. To 20 poorest people of New Romney 20/-. To George Hazer, Thomas Beare & Simon Hunt & Agnes Harley my servants 20/- each. To my servant Katherine Whiting 13/4. To my two sons Christopher & Richard 6/8each. To my sons William Epps & Allen Epps my lease and term of 10 years yet to come of land in Lyd, in occupation of Richard Glover, called Brodewater, 50 acres, which I hold by lease made by Mr. John Fetteplace to my brother William Epps. Rest of goods to my brother John Epps & Robert Butcher and they to be executors. As to lands in parishes of New Romney, Old Romney, Hope All Saints, Midley, Dimchurch, Burmoroke etc. co. Kent My executors to sell 16 acres of my marsh lands in Yokes parish of St. Martins Powntney in New Romney and 16 acres of marsh lands in Brensit & Joychurch [sic?, Ivychurch?] co. Kent. Money to pay debts. Rest of lands to my 2 sons William and Allen Epps in fee. My executors to account yearly before Clement Stuppeney & Thomas Goderye junior, jurats of Lyd until my sons are 21. If my wife be with children, and if a son, to such £200 at 21, if a maid, to such £100 at 17. Witnesses Thomas Godfrey, Matthew Flowy, William Dallett.

"The inquisition post mortem taken at Maidstone on 13 September 27 Elizabeth (1587) states he died 21 April 1585:

"Deceased held a principal messuage and 20 acres in New Romney; 140 acres in Dymchurch, Burmarsh, Romney, Medley St. Martin’s, and Poutney, Kent; and 20 acres in Brensett in Romney Marsh. His tenements in New Romney were held of the Queen’s Manor of East Greenwish; in Dymchurch Of the Queen’s Manor of Alington; in Brensett of Sir Thomas Scott as of his Manor of Brensett; in Old and New Romney of William Cooke gent. as of his Manor of Longport; and in Romney Marsh of [blank] Herdson gent. as of his Manor of Nuingtowne, Kent. Thomas Epps left sons and heirs William Epps, aged 8, and Allan Epps, aged 6.

"6. Margery (Margaret) Epes, baptized 9 [ ] 1546 at Lydd, died after 1585, married, 5 February 1567/8 at Lydd, Kent,

"7. John Epes, married Thomazine Fisher 

John Epes, Gent., late of New Inn, third son and one of the heirs of Alan Eppes, late of Lydde, Gent., was admitted to the Middle Temple on 2 August 1572. He was living at New Romney in 1579, was of Detling 1579-92, although also was of Maidstone in 1578 and of Ashford 1592-1627. He was administrator of his brother William in 1578, executor of his uncle William in 1581, and executor of his brother Thomas in 1585.

"He married, 15 June 1579 at Detling, Kent, Thomazine Fisher, daughter of Alexander Fisher (who was buried 7 September 1590) of Horsepool in Detling and his wife Katherine, daughter of Peter Maplesden of Lydd, Kent.

"He was involved in a suit over the estate of his wife’s brother-in-law, Caleb Banks, in 1595:

"Interrogatories and depositions in the case of Humphrey Wilde and Miles Hubbard v. John Epps etc. The interrogatories state that John Epps and others named in Easter term 40 Eliz. brought an action for recovery of debts against Margaret Banks, executrix of Caleb Banks; depositions are now taken to establish what estate was owned by Caleb Banks.

"Depositions taken on 2 May 42 Elizabeth (1595) from:

"John Banks of Ashford, Kent, woolen draper. He is advised by his counsel that he need not declare what goods of Caleb Banks he has in his hands. Margaret Banks has taken some of the profits of his lands. Caleb Banks owed the deponent £600 and had many cattle on his farm at Ryton.

"Edward Halle of Ashford, gent, attorney in the Court of King’s Bench, says that John Epps and Margaret Banks advised him that Caleb Banks had a weak estate. The deponent has presented the case against Margaret Banks with her agreement and the advice of the deponent.

"John Epps of Ashford, gent, says that Caleb Banks owed him £100 and in addition the deponent had stood surety for him to Roger Kemp for a debt of £200. Kemp has since brought a case against the deponent for recovery. Margaret Banks is the sister of the deponent’s wife and, because of that, he assigned the deponent three leases in order to satisfy his debt. When he died Caleb Banks’ estate amounted to £1500 or £1600. (Deponent signs.)

"James Martin of Ashford, gent, attorney in the King’s Bench, says he held a lease from Caleb Banks and now holds it from Margaret Banks.

"Several years later he was involved in transactions with Caleb Banks’ widow and his brother John:

"8 Feb 1599/1600. Recognizance of £70 from John Eppes of Ashford, Kent, gent., and John Banckes of the same, draper, to James Pennington and Thomas Wood, citizen of London, dated 8 February 1599/1600, in compliance with a decree in Chancery of 9 February 1599/1600 in the case of Pennington and Wood plaintiffs vs. Epps and Banckes and one Margaret Banckes, widow, defendants. Marginal note that the decree was vacated because Pennington and Wood were satisfied on 12 November 42 Eliz. (1600).

"On 22 September 1619 John Epps of Ashford, Kent, Gent., deposed at Rye, Sussex, that he, being aged 69, had known Sir Norton Knatchbull for forty years, and knew his father, Richard Knatchbull, and his brother Richard Knatchbull, and deposed about the extents and rights of the Manor of Cheyne Court which he had known for fifty years.

"John Epps died in Brook, a village three and a half miles from Ashford and, as John Epes, gent., householder, was buried at Ashford 19 November 1627. His will, made a John Epse of Ashford, co. Kent, the elder, dated 10 August 1625 and proved 16 December 1627, provided:

"To my wife Thomasine goods etc. To my daughter Thomasine Epes bedstead etc. pestle which was my sister Fookyes [sic?, Tookyes?] & £10. To my son John Epes £10 when my house in North Lane is sold. To my son Edward £10. To Peter Epes £10 and so to the rest of my sons. My wife to be executrix. My house in North Lane in Ashford & closes etc. to be sold & rest of money to my executrix but if dead to my sons John Epes, William Epes, Francis Epes, Peter Epes & Edward Epes. My wife Thomasine with consent of my brother in law John Bankes of Maidstone, my cousin Alline Epes & my son Rooper to sell said tenement. They to be overseers & to them 10/- each.

"Witn[ess] Edmunc Hayes.

Issue:

"1. Katherine Epes, baptized 21 Jan 1581/2, buried 1 June 1582 at Detling.

"2. William Epes; born ca. 1584, buried 17 Jan 1592/3 at Detling.

"Capt. William Epes, baptized 7 March 1594/5, was in France and the Low Countries in 1616 and late in 1617 was living with his cousin Thomas Godfrey at Selling, Kent. Soon afterwards he sailed for Virginia in the William and Thomas, arriving 29 August 1618. He was employed as agent by Sir Nicholas Tufton (afterwards Earl of Thanet) and was in command of Smith’s Hundred Company in 1619 when he engaged in a shipboard quarrel near Newport News with Capt. Edward Roecroft alias Stallenge and, striking him with his scabarded sword, ‘cleft’ his skull. Rosecroft died the next day. Epes, tried, was found guilty of manslaughter, but after a short while was restored to his command. By 1623 he was commander of the Eastern Shore. In the census, 16 Feb 1623/4, he, Mrs. Epes and ‘Petter Epps’ are listed on the Eastern Shore. Here in 1624 William Epes accused Ensign Savage of libelling him and ‘did lay the said Ensign Savage neck and heels;’ small wonder he was called a ‘mad, ranting fellow.’ In 1627 or the next year he moved to St. Christopher’s, West Indies.

"By 3 May 1630 William Epes was a member of the Council of St. Christopher’s. On 18 July 1633 he made a power of attorney to William Stone concerning his land in Virginia. By the later 1630s he had returned to Ashford, Kent. His will, 13 Jan 1640/1-3 Mar 1642/3, named his wife Margaret, son William and daughter Frances. Margaret, who came to Virginia in the George, 1621, married him by 1623. Her sister, Mrs. Harthwaye, was with her in Virginia. Margaret married (2) Dr. Henry Bradshaw, rector of Chawton, Hampshire, and Prebendary of Winchester Cathedral, who died in 1690. She was buried 19 January 1673/4."

"3. John Epes, born ca. 1586, died after Aug 1625. As John Epps the younger he was bequeathed a little roan nag in the will of his mother’s brother-in-law Caleb Bankes, 12 March 1597.

"4. Katherine Epes, born ca. 1588, married (1) 18 Nov 1606 at Rotherhithe, Surrey, her cousin Peter Maplesden and (2) (license 24) May 1615 at Ashford, John Sloman.

"5. Thomas Epes, baptized 31 Aug 1589 at Detling, died before 1619.

"6. Daniel Epes, died 1619-25

"7. Thamazin, baptized 2 April 1592 at Ashford, died after Aug 1625.

"8. Elizabeth Epes, baptized 13 May 1593 at Ashford, died before Aug 1625.

"9. Ann Epes, born ca. 1594, married, (allegation 13) Sep 1619 at Eusitivell, Kent, Edward Hudson, Gent., of Stanton-on-Arrow, County Hereford.

"10. Francis Epes, immigrant to Virginia.

"11. Allen Epes, baptized 22 Oct 1598 at Ashford, died before 1625, unmarried.

"12. Mary Epes, baptized 18 Nov 1599 at Ashford. She married, (license 3) March 1622/3 at Kennington, co. Surrey, William Roper, Gent., of Stoke, Kent, second son of Christopher Roper (1561-1622), 2nd Baron Teynham, of the Lodge, Linsted, Kent, and his wife Katharine Seborne. He inherited the estate of Malmaine in Stoke which had come to the Roper family from his paternal grandmother but alienated it to ____ Jones in the reign of Chalres I.

"13. Peter Epes, baptized 14 April 1601, was living in Virginia before the massacre of 22 March 1621/2 and was living on the Eastern Shore with his brother William Epes, 16 Feb 1623/4, but seems to have returned to England before the muster of Feb 1624/5. His father’s will, dated 10 Aug 1625, implies he was then at Ashford, but no later records of him have been found in England or Virginia.

"14. Edward Epes, died after Aug 1625 

Francis Epes, son of John and Thomazine (Fisher) Epes, was baptized 14 May 1597. The date of his arrival in Virginia and the name of the ship on which he came are not known but he must have been a resident of Virginia for some time before April 1625 when we he was elected from Shirley Hundred to sit in the Assembly at James City on 10 May ensuing. Ensign Francis Epes testified, 9 January 1625/6, in the controversy between Mr. Thomas Pawlett and the Rev. Greville Pooley. He was appointed commissioner of forces with Captain Thomas Pawlett to attack the Weyanoke and Appomattox Indians, 4 July 1627. He was also a member of the Assembly of March 1627/8, by which time he was a Captain.

"There is no record of Francis Epes in Virginia between 7 March 1628/9 and 21 February 1631/2. He probably returned to England with his wife and two sons, for on 8 September 1630 ‘Thomas, son of Francis Epes and Marie was born" in London. By February 1631/2 Francis Epes was again in Virginia, serving as a member of the House of Burgesses for Shirley Hundred, Mr. Farrar’s and Chaplaine’s. On 26 August 1635 as Captain Francis Epes he was granted 1700 acres in Charles City County on Appomattox River for the transportation of himself, his sons John, Francis and Thomas, and thirty other persons, two of whom, John Baker and Thomas Warden, are listed in the Muster among the servants of Capt. William Epes on the Eastern Shore. A portion of this tract, owned by the Epes family of ‘Appomattox Manor,’ remained in the family until 1978, and was acquired by the National Park Service in 1979. Until that time it was reputed to be the oldest plantation still in the hands of descendants of the original owner.

[Comment: Francis Epes’ original grant of 1700 acres was the present site of the city of Hopewell, Virginia, formerly called City Point, and now in Prince George County.] 

[Comment: Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, California, provided the following information regarding the Epes’ family home: "He called his plantation Hopewell Farm and his home Eppington. It was later rebuilt by the Epes family and renamed Appomattox Manor. Thomas Jefferson’s daughter Maria married Epes’ great grandson and lived in the manor house for several years before she died at age twenty-five. It is now on the ‘Petersburg Battlefield’ at Hopewell, Va."]

"A list of the ‘Names of the cheifest … planters that hath both ventured theire Lives & estates for the plantation of Virginia’ which is preserved in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University names Capt. John West, Capt. Samuel Mathewes, Capt. William Claborne, Capt. William Peirce, Capt. Francis Eppes, Mr. William Ferrar, Capt. John Uty, Capt. John Pott and Capt. [Thomas] Osborne and as merchants and planters George Menefie, Richard Bennett, Edward Cage, George Downes, Obedience Robinns and Nathaniell Oldest. Francis Epes standing in the Colony is clearly indicated by this petition.

"He again served in the House of Burgesses for Charles City, 1639/40 and 1645/6. As early as June 1637 he was recommended for appointment as a member of the Council of Virginia, although it was some time before he was actually appointed to that position.

"The maiden name of his wife is unknown and her given name Marie [Mary] is known only from the baptismal record of their son. Mrs. Epes was still alive in January 1643/4 when Capt. Thomas Pawlett of Charles City, a brother of Sir John Pawlett, wrote his will, naming Francis Epes as one of the overseers of the will and leaving him his drum, giving to Mrs. Epes his Bible and 20 shillings to buy a mourning ring in his memory, and to his godchildren, Francis Epes (second son of Capt. Epes) and William Farrar (eldest son of William Farrar), ‘a silver spoon and my silver bowl and wine cup to be divided between them.’

"Capt. Francis Epes did not claim his wife as a headright in any existing land patent. Since not all patents have been preserved, however, perhaps she was used as a headright in the now lost patent to his Eppes Island property, referred to in the 1644 patents of Walter Aston and John George.

"In April 1652 Capt. Francis Epes was named to the Council of State and soon advanced to Colonel, as in January 1653/4 a patent was issued to Col. Francis Epes, Esquire, one of the Council of State, for 280 acres in Charles City County on the south side of James and Appomattox rivers, joining on the east his 1700 acre tract, due for the transportation of six persons. Since the initial patent was issued during the Commonwealth, following the accession of King Charles II he renewed it on 17 February 1663/4 and the whole 1980 acres was consolidated in one patent, 4 October 1668.

"This is the last reference to Francis Epes as being alive. There are no Charles City County records preserved until February 1672/3 when a 48 page fragment of an Order Book begins. Col. Francis Epes is not mentioned therein, although his sons John and Thomas are. He was certainly dead by 30 September 1674 when his son and heir, Lt. Col. John Epes patented a tract of 2250 acres, which included his father’s patents of 1635 and 1653/4 and some 570 acres of contiguous land due for the transportation of eleven persons.

"Issue:

"1. John Epes, married Mary Kent.

"John Epes, born about 1626, was the eldest son of his father. He married about 1645, Mary Kent, daughter of Humphrey Kent and his wife Joane. On 3 August 1653 they sold 60 acres at Weyanoke where Humphrey Kent had resided. By 1657 John Epes was living on Shirley Hundred Island, now known as Eppes Island.

"In 1661 he was captain of the company from Swinhouse Creek to Capt. Stegge’s Creek, all of Shirley Hundred Island and from Bykor’s Creek to Powell’s Creek on the south side of the river, by 1671 was major and in 1673 was lieutenant colonel. The General Assembly which met 23 March 1661/2 ordered Capt. Robert Wynne and Capt. John Eps to summon some of the neighbors with them to settle the boundary between Westover and Martin’s Brandon Parish.

"On 30 September 1674 he repatented his land on the south side of James River between Gravelly Creek, the city landing and Causin’s Creek, adding 572 acres of new land to his father’s former patents of 1700 and 280 acres.

"Col. John Epes was sheriff of Charles City County, February 1675/6 and on 26 May 1677 was appointed one of the four officials in Charles City County to examine witnesses concerning grievances in the aftermath of Bacon’s Rebellion. He was a justice as early as 1655 and was appointed one of the justices of the quorum by Lieutenant Governor Herbert Jeffreys on 5 November 1677. He was alive 4 August 1679 but died by 16 October 1679 when John Epes was mentioned as administrator of his father’s estate."

"2. Francis Epes, married (1) _____, (2) Elizabeth (____) Worsham.

"3. Thomas Epes, married Elizabeth _____."

"Thomas Epes was baptized 8 Sep 1630 at St. Olave, Hart Street, London. Mr. Thomas Epes was referred to, 27 Aug 1656, and on 3 Aug 1658 a suit between John Sloman, Gent., and Capt John Epes, Mr. Francis Epes and Mr. Thomas Epes is mentioned. Mr. Thomas Epes was listed as a justice, 4 Aug 1673, along with his brother Lt. Col. John Epes. He witnessed an instrument of Mrs. Jane Osborne 1 Nov 1676 but died before 4 June 1679 when the petition of Elizabeth Epps, widow of Thomas Epps, was answered in Charles City court. It was ordered that she remain in possession of Epes’ estate until the next court, at which she was ordered to appear and make her further claims."

–w—

  At this point we will inject two excerpts from other sources which provide us with substantiating information.

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"Francis Epes #1, baptized 14 May 1597 at Ashford, Kent, England, died in Charles City County after 1668 and before 30 September 1674. He married Mary _____ and had issue: John Epes, Francis Epes Jr. and Thomas Epes.

"Captain Francis Epes was granted 1700 acres in the County of Charles City 26 August 1655: ‘E. upon Bayley his Crk., S, into the maine land, W. upon Cason his Cr., up Appamatuck Riv. & N. upon the maine (James) River. 50 ac. For his per. adv(enture), & 1650 acs. For trans. Of 3 sons, Joh. Epes, Fr. Epes & 30 servants (named).

"Captain Francis Epes came to Virginia in the Hopewell, and named his plantation ‘Hopewell Farms,’ later known as City Point, the James River port at the confluence of the Appomattox; the modern city of Hopewell now occupies all of the 1655 grant, with the exception of ‘Appomattox Manor,’ the house and dependencies of five acres, still owned by a direct descendant of Capt. Francis Epes, the earliest piece of property in America still owned by a descendant of the original patentee.

"Captain Epes was a member of the Governor’s Council in 1637, and a Burgess for Charles City County 1631-32, 1639 and 1645. He was an ensign in 1623 when the effects of the 1622 Indian massacre were deeply felt; later captain and then a Colonel in the Militia."

–w—

"Arms — Per fesse gules and or, a pale counterchanged, three eagles displayed of the last.

"Crest — On a chaplet vert flowered or, a falcon rising of the last

"The surname Eppes, with its variants Ebbs, Epps, Eppson, Epperson and Epp, is of baptismal origin, meaning ‘the son of Ebb.’ The parent of this surname was ‘Ebb,’ which was the nickname for Isabella. This was very popular in its day. 

"I. Lieutenant-Colonel Francis (I) Eppes, in early records often referred to as Captain Eppes or Epes, came to America, evidently about 1623-24. Hotten’s list of the living and the dead in Virginia as of 13 February 1623, which list purports to include all settlers in Virginia in the latter year, does not include the name of Francis Eppes. Had he been in the colony at that time his name would have been included, expecially as he was prominent enough to become a member of the House of Burgesses in 1625. The logical inference, therefore, is that he came some time in the latter part of 1623 or 1624, as he must have been a resident some while before entering office. Circumstances indicate that he returned to Virginia in 1631, when he was again made a member of the Assembly. The ‘Sainsbury Papers,’ composed of various records relating to the early colonial history of Virginia, compiled in the London office by William Noel Sainsbury, show that Francis Eppes was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1625 only, and not again until the year 1631-32. He settled on the south shore of the James River near the mouth of the Appomattox. Henrico and Charles City counties were on both sides of the James River, and Colonel Eppes acquired extensive estates in each county. On 26 August 1636, he obtained a grant of land in Charles City County, Virginia, for the transportation of himself, his three sons, John, Francis and Thomas, and some thirty servants into the Virginia Colony. On 30 April 1652, he became a member of the Colonial Council, and died in 1655.

"Mr. Stanard, in his ‘Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,’ states that Francis Eppes, son of Francis, the immigrant, was born about 1628. He, too, must have been an immigrant, else he could not have land claimed for him, as above stated. Thomas, son of Francis Eppes, is listed as probably the youngest son, therefore, born after 1628. The following, which is the result of an exhaustive search among the English vital records, gives the date of his birth, as well as the first name of his mother: ‘Thomas, son of Francis and Marie Eps, born 18 September 1630.’ County Kent, England, where the Eppes family had been long domiciled, lies directly adjacent to Middlesex, which includes London. Francis Eppes, therefore, was evidently temporarily living in London, just prior to his second venture to Virginia. It is evident, too, from the fact that no land was applied for in her name, that Marie, his wife, died in London soon after the birth of Thomas.

"Lieutenant-Colonel Francis (I) Eppes married, in England, Marie, whose surname is unknown, and who must have died shortly after 1630. Children: 1. John. 2. Francis. 3. Thomas, born 18 September 1630."

–w—

Francis Epes, deposed, 8 July 1677, he was aged 49 or thereabouts and, 20 August 1678, that he was aged 50 or thereabouts, and was presumably born in Virginia. By 20 April 1658 he was a justice of Charles City County and he was called captain, 4 June 1660, but seems to have removed to Henrico County shortly afterward. A bond given my Samuel Claphamson to Frances Epes and his wife Elizabeth on 17 October 1679 described them as residents of ‘Burmooda Hundred in the upper parts of James River in Virga.’

"At a meeting of the militia at Westover, 12 June 1661, it was ordered that a trained band, with additional horse, report to Fort Henry upon occasion of alarm and there to be commanded by Capt. Francis Epes, one of the captains of ‘the Guards of the Counties.’ H was a justice of Henrico County on _ February 1664/5 and served as Burgess, 1670-76. On 27 October 1673 Major Francis Epes was granted 927 acres, 2 rods and 16 poles of land in Henrico County on the north side of Appomattock River on Swift Creek.

[Comment: His move to Henrico was really no big deal! At the time, Henrico included all of what is now Chesterfield County. Swift Creek, where he was granted his land in 1673, was just across the Appomattox River and a little up-river from his father’s original grant at the present site of Hopewell. Swift Creek flows into the Appomattox opposite Petersburg.]

"In March 1675/6, in an Act for defense against the Indians, Lt. Col. Francis Epes of Henrico is mentioned. Col. Francis Epes was present at an Orphans’ Court at Varina in Henrico County, 20 August 1678, when he gave an account of cattle belonging to Charles and Mary Worsham, orphans of Mr. William Worsham.

"Col. Francis Epes was one of the factors of John Brown and Thomas Sandys of London in the tobacco trade.

"A letter of Colonel Herbert Jeffreys, the Governor of Virginia, to Sir Henry Coventry reported that:

"On the 22nd and 23rd of August [1678] some Indians came downe uppon james River to the number of 150 or 200 in Henrico County … on the 24th some of the Militia officers of Henrico County gott upp a party of forty six horse and march’d imediately upp to [ ] upper plantation of Coll: [Rowland] Place’s: The cheife officer Coll: [Francis] Epps and Major [William] harris were kill’d and two more wounded …

"He was dead by 28 August 1678 when Elizabeth Epes of Burmodii Hundred, widow, wrote the first of her two wills. On 2 December 1678 Mr. Richard Cocke, Sr., aged 38, deposed that Col. Francis Epes the day before he died gave his estate to his wife and four children. The same day William Randolph, aged 28, deposed that he was at Col. Francis Epes’ house one or two days before his death, he being dangerously wounded and had no time to make a will, but that he wanted his estate to go to his wife and four children, and he hoped his brother would seat one of them at Cawsons and that Lanclands would serve one of the boys.

"In October 1688 Micajah Perry, merchant of London, was appointed by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury to administer the estate of Francis Epes, the Elder, of Virginia during the absence of his son Francis Epes.

"Colonel Francis Epes married (1), about 1658, _____ and (2), about 1661, Mrs. Elizabeth Worsham, widow of William Worsham [Book 4] of Henrico County. As Elizabeth Epes of ‘Burmodii’ hundred, widow and relict of Col. Francis Epes of the County of Henrico, she made two wills, one dated 28 August 1678, in which she provided for her Worsham children, John Worsham, Elizabeth, wife of Richard Kennon, Mary Worsham and Charles Worsham, and the other, dated 23 September 1678, in which she provided for her Epes children, William, Littlebury and Mary Epes. She appointed her son-in-law Richard Kennon and her son-in-law [stepson] Francis Epes her executors. Both wills were proved 1 October 1678.

[Comment: My wife, Elise, and I are related! Elise is a descendant of Elizabeth Littlebury(?) Worsham by her first husband, William Worsham — see Book 4. And as we document herein, I am descended from Elizabeth Worsham through her second husband, Francis Epes.]

 

[Comment: Regarding Francis Epes’ first wife, the author, a prominent genealogist, included this information in a footnote: "It has been erroneously assumed that she was a Miss Wells because an account of the estate of Thomas Wells, deceased, returned 2 March 1701/2 shows that Capt. Francis3 Epes was paid 20,649 pounds of tobacco, which included two-fifths part of 19 hogsheads of tobacco and ten barrels of Indian corn. This does not, however, indicate that Francis3 Epes was an heir of Thomas Wells, who died in Sept 1696 leaving a widow Mary, a son Thomas and a daughter Mary, both under 15. The payment resulted from a judgment obtained 2 Aug 1697 by Capt. Francis3 Epes against Thomas Parker and Mary his wife, executrix of the estate of Thomas Wells, deceased, for a debt of 24,000 pounds of tobacco." On the other hand, this information does not prove that Francis2 Epes did not marry the daughter of Thomas Wells. Until we know more, the suit could very well, e.g., have been over non-payment of an inheritance.] 

"Issue:

"1. Francis Epes, married Anne Isham

"Francis3 Epes deposed 1 Aug 1691 that he was aged about 32 years but was probably older since, as administrator of his father’s estate following his death in Aug 1678, he must then have been 21. He was named executor of his step-mother’s estate that same month. From his residence he was known as Francis Epes of Bermuda Hundred. His home, then in Henrico County, fell into Chesterfield County upon its creation in 1749. He was sworn as a justice of the peace for Henrico County , 1 June 1683, was sheriff in 1685 and again in 1686, and by 12 Oct 1688 was referred to as captain. In 1690 he was one of the ‘Commissioners for taking subscriptions towards a College [William and Mary, chartered 1693] to be erected.’ He was Burgess for Henrico County 1691-92, 1693, 1702/3-1705 and 1705-06. On 6 April 1700 he was again appointed sheriff of Henrico County and was appointed twice more on 27 April 1710 and 27 April 1711.

"He received numerous grants of land in Henrico County and on 24 Oct 1701, with his half-brothers William and Littelbury Epes, received 1,000 acres in Charles City (later Prince George) County on the south side of Warwick Swamp and the north side of Joseph Swamp, due for the transportation of twenty persons. On 24 April 1703 a grant of 4,000 acres in Henrico County was issued to Capt. Francis Epes, Mr. Isham Epes, Mr. Francis Epes, Jr., Mr. George Robinson, Minister, Mrs. Elizabeth Kennon, Mr. Phillip Jones, Mrs. Martha Stratton, Mr. George Archer and Mr. James Hill for the transportation of 80 persons, including a Francis Epes. This suggests that Francis3 had been to England and back. In 1704 he owned 226 acres in Prince George County and 2,145 acres in Henrico County. On 28 April 1711 he, Joseph Royall and George Archer petitioned that they with Mr. Richard Kennon had in 1690 entered 2827 acres in Henrico County but Governor Francis Nicholson had refused them a patent because the land lay beyond the limits he had set. Their rights were lost when the State House burned but they had obtained new rights for the same land. The Council resolved that no patent could be granted for this land until the Queen’s pleasure was known. He was frequently mentioned in the diary of William Byrd as Col. Frank Epes, and as Col. Francis Epes had land in Henrico County surveyed by Mr. Francis4 Epes, surveyor, 8 Feb 1709/10. On 26 April 1712 Col. Francis Epes, Mr. John Bolling and Mr. Richard Cocke were appointed to hear and determine the differences between the inhabitants at Manakintown about the division and proportioning of land.

"His will, no longer extant, was dated 2 Oct 1719 and it was presented for probate, 6 June 1720 by Francis Epes, his executor. He and his brother-in-law William Randolph (who married Mary Isham) were trustees of Bermuda Hundred Town and on 2 Feb 1719/20, on motion of William Randolph, surviving trustee for the town, Francis4 Epes was appointed trustee in the stead of his father, deceased.

"He married Anne Isham, daughter of Col. Henry Isham and his wife Katherine (Banks) Royall, some time between 23 Sep 1678 when Anne Isham was a witness to the will of Mrs. Elizabeth (_____) Worsham Epes and 20 Feb 1681/2 when, as Anne Eppes, she gave power of attorney to William Epes."

"2. William Epes, married Elizabeth _____.

"William Epes deposed 20 Feb 1681/2 that he was about 19 or 20 years old and on 1 Oct 1683, being of lawful age, he petitioned to receive his estate from his guardian, Mr. Francis3 Epes. He was named as her oldest Epes child in the will of his mother, Elizabeth (_____) Worsham Epes, dated 23 Sep 1678.

"On 3 Oct 1692, as William Epes, Jr., he sued Richard Bland who had refused to pay him 400 pounds of tobacco won in a horse race, but the jury found for the defendant.

"He was probably the Wm. Epes who on 4 June 1694 was appointed a surveyor of creeks to see that Bayley’s Creek was cleared of hinderances to passage by water and also probably was the Lieut. William Epes who on 14 Oct 1699 notified Edward Hill, the Commander in Chief of the militia of Charles City County, that great numbers of strange Indians were upon the frontiers and was ordered to raise men to go after them.

"On 24 Oct 1701 Capt. Francis3 Epes, Mr. William Epes and Capt. Littlebury Epes patented 1000 acres in Charles City County on the south side of Warwick Swamp and north side of Joseph Swamp, due for the transportation of twenty persons. In 1702 this land fell into the new county of Prince George where the quit rent roll of 1704 lists William Epes with 633 ½ acres representing his one-third of this tract and another 300 acres, presumably ‘Causons’ which his father in his nuncupative will hoped would be settled on one of his sons.

"On 27 April 1710 William Epes was named sheriff of Prince George County. He was mentioned as Sheriff several times in the diary of William Byrd of Westover but died 16 Nov 1710 leaving a will, now lost, of which his widow Elizabeth was executrix. She brought several suits in that capacity and was still alive 14 April 1719 when sued as executrix by Henry Holecroft for 3174 pounds of tobacco due by bill dated 24 July 1717. On 1 May 1712 538 acres on the south side of Gravelly Run, Prince George County, was surveyed for her."

"3. Littlebury Epes, married (1) _____ Llewellyn, (2) _____

"Littlebury Epes, born about 1664, married (1), about 1689, _____ Llewellyn, daughter of Daniel Llewellyn, Jr., whose will, dated Jan 1710/11, made his grandson Llewellin Epes his principal heir but had a provision that, should his grandson die without issue, the property would go to Daniel Llewellyn’s nephew Richard Jones.

"He married (2) _____.

"Littlebury Epes was sub-sheriff of Henrico County under his brother Francis3 in 1685, was a justice of Charles City County, 1699, and later, was sheriff, 1700. On 24 Feb 1702/3 he was appointed deputy collector of customs for the Upper District of James River, to serve during the absence of Edward Hill in England. He served as Burgess for Charles City County, 1710-14, and by 1714 anf for many years thereafter was clerk of Charles City Court. As early as 20 Aug 1698 he was a captain of the county militia and by 27 Oct 1710, when his election as Burgess was contested, was referred to as Col. Epes. In 1704 he held 400 acres in Charles City and 833 ½ acres in Prince George County.

"He was witness to the will of William Byrd I, 8 July 1700, and proved it 12 Jan 1704/5. He and his sons Llewellin and Edmund (Ned) were frequently mentioned in the diaries of William Byrd from 1709 on, but Mrs. Epes was never mentioned. His will, now lost, was proved Dec 1743."

"4. Mary Epes, married (1) John Hardyman, (2) Charles Goodrich."

–w—

 

We will now digress, and backtrack, a bit to include some of the material from other sources with respect to Francis Epes I, the emigrant, and his son, Francis Epes II. First of all, I will excerpt the material presented in Book 4 regarding the mysterious woman, Elizabeth Worsham, and Francis Epes, her second husband. 

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"Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) Epes’ son, John Worsham, and her last husband, Col. Francis Epes, were gregarious, civic-minded citizens. Because of these characteristics, their names occur numerous times in the few extant records of Henrico County, Virginia. Even so, we did not find enough data to solve all the mysteries of their colonial relationships.

"For example, what was Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) Epes’ maiden name? And how many husbands did she have — two or three? Also, was the young William Worsham who was the deponent in the following deposition her son by her husband William Worsham (d. ca. 1660) or was he her son by an earlier marriage to another Worsham man? One reason for this uncertainty is that Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) Epes did not mention a son William Worsham on 28 August 1678, when she wrote her will in behalf of her Worsham children whom she had by William Worsham.

"The circumstances provoking the depositions of young William Worsham and his stepfather, Col. Francis Epes, were that Capt. Edward Hill, the sheriff in Charles City County, Virginia, was attempting to ‘press for public service’ a horse belonging to Dr. William Irby, who was refusing to let the sheriff ‘borrow’ the horse. Other people were present, and the confrontation was well under way when Col. Epes and his stepson, William Worsuam (sic) arrived. Their depositions tell it this way:

"Court held at Westover, June 1665.

"Mr. Bland Sir: The difference between Capt. Hill and Mr. Irby was almost over before I came up to them but I can testify that when I did come up to them, Mr. Irby had his horse by the halter with one hand and his cutlass drawn in the other, and after some words, Capt. Hill spoke to one of his men to take the horse, at which words Mr. Irby made a proffer to strike, and said he should not have his horse, for he would defend him. With that I stepped by Mr. Irby and desired him he would not be in such a mad humor, and told him certainly he knew not what he did. Irby replied he was going upon life and death; Mr. Irby I said you have a boat to go about your occasions which is all well. Come lend me your horse; after a little pause, well, said he, I will lend you my horse provided you will be very careful of him, but for all he can do (pointing to Capt. Hill) should never have him upon my account. This I am able to depose.

"Sir, I have sent Will Wosuam (sic) to you and I had waited on you had I had convenience. sir your Servant (Signed) Fran Epes (p. 560 in Order Book of Charles City Co.)

Deposition of Will Worsuam (sic) taken at Westover Court:

"Will Worsuam aged 18 years or thereabouts examined and sworne in court saith as follows

"That being at Mr. Irby’s house when Capt. Hill pressed the horse of the said Irby upon public service, this deponent saw the said Irby lift up his hanger at the said Capt. Hill, and his wife tooke hold of his sleeve and desired him to hold his hand. And the said Irby replied that he would lend his horse to the deponent’s father, but he would not have him pressed, and further sayeth not

"(Signed) William Worsuam

"Juratr in Cur June: 3. 1665 Teste Hoel Pryee Cl Cur.

(p. 650 in Order Book of Charles City County)

"So, why did Elizabeth (1st Wm. Worsham) Epes not mention this young deponent, William Worsham, in her will thirteen years later? Is there any other way whereby this young deponent William Worsuam (sic) could have referred to Col. Francis Epes as ‘the deponent’s father’? Maybe Francis Epes’ previous wife had also been a widow Worsham and had had a son named William. Or, maybe Elizabeth had married a Worsham man before she married William Worsham. Or maybe young William Worsham died prior to 1678. [This last seems more likely to me.]

"There are three other depositions in the court records of Charles City County which verify that in February 1655 a William Worsuham (sic) of Jordans had a son named William. The three men — Anthony Wyatt, George Worsuhan (sic) and Col. Edd Hill esq. — testified ‘in Court that William the sonne of William Worsuham of Jordans in this County’ had an accidental fall in his childhood, and his ear was cut, which ‘least future times should Convert to Calumny,’ they desired to vindicate him from any thought of the split ear being infamous.

"But getting back to Francis Moody’s great-great-great-grandmother, we surmise that she was born in the early 1630s ‘or thereabouts.’ In a deposition which her last husband, Colonel Francis Epes swore to in the Henrico County Court on 20 August 1678, his age was ‘50 years or thereabouts.’ Since this indicates that he was born in 1628 ‘or thereabouts,’ we hereby assume, correctly or incorrectly, that Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) Epes was approximately the same age.

"Indeed, her son John Worsham and his son Francis Epes were approximately the same age and were closely associated in civic affairs throughout their adult lives. These stepbrothers, both born before 1657, were over 21 years old in 1678 when their parents died. In fact they were the only children of Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) and Col. Francis Epes except her married daughter Elizabeth Kennon, who did not require guardians when Col. Epes died after 20 August and prior to 28 August 1678.

"On 20 August 1678, Col. Epes was in Court where ‘an account of the cattle belonging to Charles Worsham and Mary Worsham, orphans of William Worsham deceased was presented by Col. Francis Epes, ‘viz, 7 cows, 3 heifers of one year old and 2 horses being...’ Furthermore, the justices present that day were Col. Francis Epes, Maj. William Harris, and others. Also, on that same day, 20 August 1678, in court ‘Francis Epes age 50 years or thereabouts deposeth that about ‘69 or ‘70 Jno. Rudderfield being at the house of Mr. Thomas Gage came, Capt. Henry Insham and the deponent being then there at which time the said Rudderfield did possess the said Capt. Isham with three head of cattle which did belong to an orphan girl then in the tuition of the said Rudderfield which cattle the said Capt. Isham was to deliver to the said orphan in kind as soon as she came to age, but the ages of the cattle or whether cows or heifers the deponent cannot remember.’ So, Col. Francis Epes was alive and apparently doing quite well on 20 August 1678.

"But, eight days later on 28 August 1678, when his wife had her will written in behalf of her four Worsham children, she referred to herself as ‘I, Elizabeth Epes of Bermudy Hundred widow being very sick and weak....’ Apparently, Elizabeth (1st Wm Worsham) Epes really knew that she had an illness from which she was unlikely to recover because in the second item of her will in behalf of her Epes children she said, ‘I do hereby ratify and confirm that part of my estate which I have in this my last sickness given to my children which I had by my former husband Mr. William Worsham deceased...’ Colonel Francis Epes, however, did not have an illness. He died of wounds inflicted upon him by means unknown to us. He could have been fatally injured in an accident of some kind. Also, John Worsham’s presentments to the grand jury in March 1677-78 (March 1 through 24 was the last month of the year) and April 1678 indicate that there were potentially hazardous relationships among some citizens on the South Side of the James River. For example, ‘To the court: John Worsham humbly showeth that whereas the worships hath been pleased to appoint (him) one of the grand jury (he) presents the persons whose names are underwritten and the offenses or misdemeanors by them committed.

"March 20, 1677. My father Epes told me that John Milner was drunk, and also Thomas Chamberlayne and Mr. Bullington was fighting, which may appear at ye court by my father.

"April 11, 1678. My father Epes and Mr. Thomas Chamberlayne was fighting and Mr. Chamberlayne made a breach of the law as may appear by evidence.

"After having been wounded, Colonel Eppes did not even have an opportunity to make a written will. He had to rely upon his nuncupative will — verbal statements made to people at his bedside. Two depositions verifying his nuncupative will are in the Henrico record of the December Court of 1678. In one deposition Mr. William Randolph, aged 28 years or thereabouts, deposeth ‘That he being at Col. Francis Epes’s house about one or two days before his death at which time he being dangerously wounded he called the deponent by his name and desired him to take notice that he had not time to make his will but would have his estate divided amongst his children upon which this deponent repeated it to him again he the Col. Epes said he would his estate be divided amongst his four children and his wife, as this deponent apprehends, and said he would have plate and everything in kind divided, this Deponent farther deposed that Mrs. Epes his wife then asked how he disposes of his land upon which Col. Epps said he hoped his Brother would seat(?) one of them at Cousons(?) and Lancktone(?) would serve one of the boys or words to the effect and further saith not. (Signed) William Randolph, Jur in Cur 2 Xbris 1678 Teste W R C1’

"The other deposition was given by Richard Cocke, aged 38 years or thereabouts. He deposed ‘that being at Col. ffrancis Epp’s house the day before he died the Col. called his wife and then did equally dispose of his said Estate to his wife and four children the plate and household stuff being to be retained in kind further the deponent saith that the said Col. Francis Epps had some words about Lanckfords(?) land for one of his children.’

"The children of Elizabeth (1st Wm. Worsham) and her husband Colonel Francis Eppes were (1) William Epes, (2) Littleberry Epes, and (3) Mary Epes. Her stepson was Francis Epes (Jr.). Named in her will, the children of Elizabeth (1st Wm. Worsham) Epes by her husband William Worsham were (1) Elizabeth (Worsham) Kennon and her son-in-law Richard Kennon and their daughter Mary Kennon; (2) her daughter Mary Worsham, (3) son Charles Worsham, and (4) her son John Worsham." 

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"Francis Epes #2, known as Francis Jr., was born 1628, killed in 1678, a Lieut. Col. Of the Virginia troops fighting against the Indians, together with Major Harris who received an arrow through his throat. Francis Epes #2 m. (1) name unknown; he m. (2) Elizabeth Littlebury Worsham who died 1678. Issue: Francis Epes, William Epes, Littlebury Epes, and Mary Epes, who married John Hardyman [Chapter 13]." 

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"II. Lieutenant-Colonel Francis (2) Eppes, son of Lieutenant-Colonel Francis (I) and Marie Eppes, was born about 1628 and died in 1678, from a wound inflicted by the Indians. He was lieutenant-colonel of the county militia and, in 1677, commissioner. The inventory of his estate, recorded in April, 1679, amounted to £313-17-10, and there was also a large amount of property, store goods, not appraised. His son, Francis, was administrator of the estate.

"Lieutenant-Colonel Francis (2) Eppes was twice married, but the name of his first wife is not known. He married (second) Elizabeth (Littlebury) Worsham, widow of William Worsham, of Henrico County. Child of the first marriage: 1. Francis. Children of the second marriage: 2. William, born in 1661. 3. Mary, born in 1664; married, in 1685, Lieutenant-Colonel John Hardiman [Chapter 13]. 4. (Lieutenant-Colonel) Littlebury, of Charles City County, Virginia, died in 1746." 

˜²™

"Lieutenant-Colonel Francis Eppes, of Henrico County, was born about 1628, and died in 1678. From the beginning of the extant Henrico records in 1677, until his death, his name appears as a justice. He married (I) _____; (II) Elizabeth, widow of Wm. Worsham, of Henrico. From the Henrico records it appears that Colonel Eppes died from a wound. On December 2d, 1678, Richard Cocke, Sr., aged about 38, deposed that he was at the house of Colonel Francis Eppes the day before he died, and Colonel Eppes said he wished his estate divided equally between his wife and four children. And on the same day Wm. Randolph, aged about 28, deposed that he was at the house of Colonel Francis Eppes a few days before he died, and said Eppes, being dangerously wounded, called him, and desired him to take notice that he wished his estate to be equally divided between his wife and four children, and when his wife asked about his land, he said he hoped his brother would seat one of them (the sons) at Causons, and that Lanctons would serve one of the boys. His son Francis was his administrator, and among his accounts with the estate are payments to Parson Williams £2, and Parson Ball 10 shillings, doubtless for the funeral services. The inventory of his estate, recorded in April, 1679, amounted to £313 17. 10., besides a large amount of property, store goods, &c., not appraised. Colonel Eppes’ second wife, Elizabeth, widow of Wm. Worsham (by whom she had issue: John Worsham, Charles Worsham, Mary Worsham, and Elizabeth Worsham, who married Richard Kennon, of ‘Conjurer’s Neck’), also died in 1678. Two wills made by her are recorded in Henrico, proved October, 1678. The first, dated 28 July 1678, and describing her as ‘Elizabeth Epes, of Bermuda Hundred, widow,’ makes the following bequests: to daughter, Elizabeth Kennon, a stone ring, her black gown, green silk petticoat, green satin bodie, and one-fourth of her money in the hands of Samuel Claphamson (of London); to her grandchild, Mary Kennon (who married Major John Bolling, of ‘Cobbs’) a stone ring ‘given me by my sister King;’ to her daughter, Mary Worsham, one-fourth of her money, certain personal property and wearing apparel, and her thumb ring; to her daughter Mary Eppes, a ‘new suite which came in this year;’ to son John Worsham, one-fourth of her money and her silver tobacco box; to son Charles Worsham, one-fourth of her money and certain other personal property. The remainder of her estate to her husband, Eppes’s children. Makes her son [in-law], Richard Kennon, executor.

"The second will, dated 23 September 1678, describes her as a widow of Col. Francis Eppes, of Henrico, deceased, ratifys all her gifts to her children by her former husband, Mr. Wm. Worsham, deceased. What estate was given to her by the verbal will of her husband, Col. Francis Eppes, she wishes to be divided equally between the children she had by said Eppes, viz: William, Littlebury, and Mary, when they come of age. Appoints her [step] son Francis Eppes, and her son [in-law], Richard Kennon, executor. The account of Francis Eppes as her executor is recorded in Henrico, and from it she appears to have been buried with all the honors. The account gives the following items: to Doctors Cogan and Spears, 1,000 pounds tobacco each, to Dr. Irby 300 pounds, to Mr. John Ball, minister, 200 pounds; for her funeral, 10 pounds butter costing 50 pounds tobacco; 2 gallons of brandy, 70 pounds tobacco; half pound of pepper and half pound of ginger, 9 pounds; 5 gallons of wine, 150 pounds; 8 pounds sugar, 32 pounds; one steer, valued at 600 pounds; 3 large whethers, at 450 pounds.

"Issue by first marriage: Francis; by second marriage: William, born 1661. On 1 Dec 1683, he receipted to his brother Francis, for his full share of the estate of his father, Colonel Francis Eppes, deceased. In February, 1738-9, Anne, daughter of Capt. Wm. Eppes, chose a guardian. Before 1739, Edw’d Osborne, of Henrico, married the daughter of Captain Wm. Eppes; Lieutenant-Colonel Littlebury, of Charles City County, justice 1699, &c., Burgess 1710, 1714; county clerk 1714, &c.; Mary, married before June, 1685, Lieut-Col. Jno. Hardiman, of Charles City County, who was a justice of Charles City, 1699-1702, and of Prince George, 1714; Anne, gave a power of attorney to her brother, William, in Feb 1681-2."

–w—

Mary Epes, daughter of Francis and Elizabeth ____ Worsham, was born in 1664, probably in Henrico County, Virginia. In or before 1685, she married John Hardyman. 

[For a continuation of the Epes family lineage, see the Hardyman family history, Chapter 13.]

 

 

 

 

Notes & References

  McSwain, Eleanor Pratt Covington, My Folk, p. 60.

White, Eurie Covington, Covington Cousins, p. 35.

"Harleian Society, LXVI, MS Rawl. B.87, fo. 18, Bodleian Library, Oxford University" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"Rotulii Hundredorum… (London, 1812), v. Norfolk, p. 527. The original is in Latin and this translation was provided by Peter Wilson Coldham Pursley, Surrey, 19 Oct 1977. The entry appears under the Hundred of Fourhowe, Norfolk. Depham appears to be Deopham, Norfolk, in the Hundred of Fourhoe and Wytelwood apparently is Wicklewood in the same Hundred. M. J. Copus, Chatham, Kent, observes the date appears to be 3 Edward I (between 20 Nov 1274 and 19 Nov 1275)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"James Renet Scott, Memorials of the Family of Scott of Scot’s Hall in the County of Kent (London, 1876), p. liv" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, III (Canterbury, 1790), p. 492" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"Calendar of the Close Rolls … Henry VI, IV, 1441-1447 (London, 1937), p. 37" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"Calendar of the Patent Rolls … Henry VI, A.D. 1452-1461 (London, 1901), p. 452" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 3.

"Calendar of the Patent Rolls … Edward IV, A.D. 1461-1467 (London, 1897), p. 256" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 4.

"Calendar of the Patent Rolls … Edward IV, A.D. 1461-1467 (London, 1897), p. 320" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 4.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports 1432-1955, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Joint Publications, v. 5; London, 1966), pp. 1, 6" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p.4.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports 1432-1955, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Joint Publications, v. 5 (London, 1966), p. 8" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 4.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports 1432-1955, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Joint Publications, v. 5 (London, 1966), p. 16" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 4.

"William Holloway, The History and Antiquities of the Ancient Town and Port of Rye in the County of Sussex (London, 1847), passim; William Holloway, The History of Romney Marsh from its Earliest Formation to 1837 (London, 1849), passim." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 4.

"Ronald Jessup and Frank Jessup, The Cinque Ports (London and New York, 1942), passim" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 5.

"Richard Kilburne, A Topographie, or Survey of the County of Kent (London, 1659), passim" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 5.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register, v. 2, p. 158" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 5.

"Court of Chancery, Ancient Deeds, Series C, ca. 1100-1627, C146/08139, British Public Record Office" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register, v. 3, fo. 239" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"Information provided by Miss Stella Colwell, 4 Aug 1980" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books, p. 186" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register 24, fo. 68v." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"Court of Requests, Proceedings, Henry VII to Charles I, Req. 2/170/44, British Public Record Office" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 6.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register 1, fo. 389, reported by R. H. d’Elboux" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 7.

Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 7.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports, 1432-1955, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission) Joint Publications, v. 5 (London, 1966), pp. 180, 183. The name appears as Espe in 1520/1." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 8.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register, v. 17, fo. 34, reported by R. H. d’Elboux" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 8.

"Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, III (Canterbury, 1790), p. 520. Anne Roper, The Church of Saint Clement, Old Romney (5th ed.; n.p., 1983), p. 18, quotes the inscription as ‘Pray for the soules of John Ips and Margaret hys wyfe on whois Almighti ihu have mercy. Amen.’ The brass plaque, which is now mounted on the wall and is inscribed with effigies of John Ips and his wife Margaret, matches an incised form on a gravestone in the aisle. It was long thought that this referred to his son John Epes, because he in his will ordered a stone for his grave to be ‘inpictorid st. me, my wyffe and all my children,’ but this brass does not conform to that description." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 9.

"The children cannot be assigned to the two wives with certainty but John Epes in his will referred to Johane as his mother-in-law [i.e., step-mother]. She was probably the mother of the younger daughters who were unmarried in 1524." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 9.

Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 8-9.

"The churches became chapels of ease after 22 April 1535 (26 Henry VIII) and were abandoned by 1659 (Richard Kilburne, A Topographic, or Survey of the County of Kent [London, 1659), p. 232). St. Marten’s was 600 feet west of St. Nicholas, New Romney, and St. Lawrence’s was 2000 feet east of St. Clement’s, Old Romney." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 10.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Consistory Registry, v. 14, p. 187, reported by R. H. d’Elboux" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 10.

"Letter of J. P. Brooke-Little, The College of Arms, 5 Nov 1963. These were possibly also the arms of his father, John Eps. They were confirmed to his great-grandson Allen Epes by William Segar, Garter King of Arms (1603-33). The blazon in the Godfrey pedigree was shown as ‘Per Fesse Gules and Or a Pale Counterchanged three Eagles displayed of the last. Crest: On a Chaplet Vert flowered Or a Falcon rising of the last.’" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 10.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register 17, fol. 260, reported by R. H. ‘Elboux" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 11.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Joint Publications, v. 5; London, 1966), pp. 222-23, 234. The churchwardens’ account book of St. Mary the Virgin, Dover, 1536-58 (Egerton, MSS, British Library) contains an entry: ‘Rec. of Will’m Epse the vijth Dye of merch in the same year [1547] for a lytell Cuppe Syluer there was in the pyxe Wyg’if ownces di. at iiijs the ownce’ (Archaeological Cantiana, XXVI [London, 1904], p. 169)." ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 11.

"Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, III (Canterbury, 1790), p. 525. He was referred to as William Eppes, Senr., in 1571, and in 1572, as William Eppes, gent., was chosen to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of William Wilcocks, gent." ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 11.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books, pp. 266, 268, 274, 277, 281, 289, 299, 307, 309. He was made a jurat for life on the incorporation of the barons and inhabitants of New Romney, 4 Aug 1563 (Calendar of the Patent Rolls … Elizabeth, III, 1560-1563 [London, 1948], p. 499." ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 11.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books, p. 289" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 12.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books, pp. 317-18" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 12

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books, pp. 647-48, 322-23, 317-18" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 12

"New Romney, Kent, Book of Notte, quoted in Cecil R. Humphrey Smith, ‘Kentish Names and Arms,’ Kent Life, SI, no. 11, 17 Nov 1972, p. 55: ‘…on the thirde day of January 1579 was the decree for doggs red & proclaymed in the churche of St Nycholas after Evensonge that all inhabitants of Newe Romney disposed to kept any dogg or curr, shoulde before the xiith of the said month enter their dogges & after observe the decrees in order as they wer red, uppon payne in those decrees expressed. These were admitted to keep dogges … William Epps Jurat 3 red spannels, one bitch all spotted red…’" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 13.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Consistory Court wills, 32.34.172, abstracted in Family History, I, April 1963, p. 124, and Eva Turner Clark, Francis Epes, His Ancestors and Descendants (New York, 1942), pp. 17-21" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 14-16.

"Report of J. P. Brooke-Little, College of Arms, London, 18 Oct 1977" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 17.

"Register of St. Clement’s Old Romney, Kent, in Eva Turner Clark, Francis Epes, His Ancesors and Descendants (New York, 1942), p. 35" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 17.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Register, PRC 17/23/255, abstract provided by M. J. Copus, Chatham, Kent. No date of probate is shown." ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 17.

"Pedigree of Godfrey of Lyd, Kent, at Visitation of Kent, 1619, reporeted by J. P. Brooke-Little, College of Arms, London, to William E. Allaun, Jr., Newport News, Va., 5 Nov 1963. The monumental brass at All Saints Church, Lydd, gives only the year of her death (Archaeologia Camtiana, VI, p. 262). Ibid., p. 264, cites notes collected by Bryan Faussett of Heppington and Lydd, great3-grandson of Peter Godfrey, that there was a tombstone in the All Saints Churchyard of Joane Godfrey, wife of Peter Godfrey, sometime of Old Romney, who died __ June 1___." ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 17.

"Hasted, op. cit., III, p. 508" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 18.

"Monumental brass, Archaeologia Cantiana, VI, p. 262" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 18.

"The Godfrey family, ancently of Lydd, Co. Kent, recorded a pedigree when the Heralds made a visitation of Kent in 1619, which stated that Joan, the dau. Of John Epps of Lydd (bur. In Old Romney) married Peter Godfrey. It also gave the arms of John Epps. (Letter of J. P. Brooke-Little, the College of Arms, 5 Nov 1963, to William E. Allaun, Jr., Newport News, Va.)" ." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 18.

"Register of St. Clement’s, Old Romney, in A.W. Hughes Clark, The Registers of St. Katharine by the Tower, London, 1584-1625, pt. 1 (Harleian Society, Registers, LXXV; London, 1945), p. 36" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 21.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Archdeaconry Court wills, PRC 17/43/367, abstract provided by M. J. Copus, Chatham, Kent" " — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp 21-24

"Register of St. Clement’s, Old Romney, in Clark, op. cit., p. 35" " — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 24

"Register of St. Clement’s, Old Romney, in Clark, op. cit., p. 36" " — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 24

"Register of St. Clement’s, Old Romney, in Clark, op. cit., p. 36" " — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 24

"Arthur Finn, ed., Records of Lydd, translated and transcribed by Arthur Hussey and M. M. Hardy (n.p., n.d.), p. 392" " — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 30.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, Consistory Register 32.24.2, abstracted in Family History I, April 1963, p. 125, and Eva Turner Clark, Francis Epes, His Ancestors and Descendants (New York, 1942), pp. 15-16" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 30-31.

"Register of All Saints (Church of the Marsh), Lydd, Kent, reported by William Robertson Epse, Devon, Pa., June 1971" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 31.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, 32.33.105, abstracted in Family History, I, April 1963, p. 123, and Clark, op. cit., pp. 22-23" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 31-32.

"Bishop’s Transcripts, New Romney, reported by J. P. Brooke-Little, College of Arms, 18 Oct 1977" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"Register of Maidstone Parish, Kent, reported by R. H. d’Elboux, Whitelands, Battle, Sussex, 1951" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"Register of All Saints (Church of the Marsh), Lydd, Kent, reported by William R. Epes, Devon, Pa., July 1971" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"A Calendar of the White and Black Books of the Cinque Ports, ed. by Felix Hull (Historical Manuscripts Commission, Joint Publications, V; London, 1966), pp. 306, 324, 327" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"Southland vs. Eppes, Calendar of State Papers, Domestic, Elizabeth, 1581-1590, ed. by Robert Lemon (London, 1865), pp. 167-68; A Calendar of the White and Black Books, p. 328" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"St. Nicholas’ Church, New Romney, Kent, Bishop’s Transcripts, reported by Stella Colwell, Oct 1977" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 32.

"Court of Requests, Proceedings, Henry VII to Charles I, Req.2/404/29, British Public Record Office" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 32-33.

"Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, IV (Canterbury, 1799), p. 311; ibid, X (2nd ed.; Canterbury, 1800, reprint 1972), p. 259" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 33.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, 32-25-169, abstracted in Family History, I, April 1963, p. 125, and Clark, op. cit., pp. 23-24" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 33.

"Inquisition post mortem, Chancery series C142/206/41, British Public Record Office, in Latin" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 34.

"Register of All Saints (Church of the Marsh), Lydd, Kent, reported by William Robertson Epes, Devon, Pa., June 1971" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 37.

"H. A. C. Sturgess, Register of Admissions to the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple (London, 1949), p. 37" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 38.

"St. Martin’s Church, Detling, Kent, Bishop’s Transcripts" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 38.

"W. Bruce Bannerman, ed., The Visitations of Kent, 1574 and 1592 … (Harleian Society, Publications, LXXV; London, 1924), p. 98. Her uncle George Maplesden, one of the Aldermen of the City of Rochester, in his will dated 1 Oct 32 Elizabeth I and proved 28 Jan 1590/1 (Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Sainberbe, 2, abstracted in Henry F. Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England [Boston, 1901], II, pp. 1291-92), left a piece of gold to 30 shillings to his sister Katherine Fisher of Detling, widow, a piece of 30 shillings to Thomazine Eppes, her daughter, and named his cousin John Eppes of Detling to be one of the overseers of the will. John Eppes was one of the witnesses." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 38.

"Court of Star Chamber, Elizabeth I, STAC 5/W2/16, W46/5, British Public Record Office" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 38-39.

"County of Chancery, Close Rolls, 1204-1903, C/1675, British Public Record Office" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 39.

"Exchequer Depositions taken by Commission, Elizabeth I to Victoria, E134/17 Jas. I/Mich. 9, British Public Record Office. Sir Norton Knatchbull was founder of the Grammar School at Ashford, Kent." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 39.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent, reported by William R. Epes, Devon, Pa. July 1971; Bishop’s Transcripts, reported by Reginald Glencross, London, June 1940" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 39.

"Probate Registry, Canterbury, 17-67-340, abstracted in Family History, I, June 1963, p. 137" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"St. Martin’s Church, Detling, Bishop’s Transcripts" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"St. Martin’s Church, Detling, Bishop’s Transcripts" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"‘The Domestic Chronicle of Thomas Godfrey, Esq.,’ The Topographer and Genealogist, II (London, 1853, pp. 454, 457, 447" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 256.

"V LXV, pp. 316-7" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"r, Va. Co. III, pp. 121, 242" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"Virginia Colonial Records Project, Survey Report 1267, 84" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"Hotten, p. 188" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"MCGC, p. 15" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"V LXV, pp. 316-17" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"W. Noel Sainsbury, ed., Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, 1584-1660 (London, 1860), p. 115" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"Northampton Co. Orders, Wills & Deeds 1632-40, p. 212. This land included 450 acres patented 3 Feb 1626/7 (Patent Bk. 1, p. 49) — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"Kent Archives Office, Probate Registry, Canterbury, 31-119-209" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"John Venn and J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses, pt. 1, I (Cambridge, 1922), p. 202; V LXV, p. 317" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 256.

"Winchester Cathedral Register" — Meyer, Virginia M., and Dorman, John Frederick, Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5, p. 257.

"Prerogative Court of Canterbury, Lewin 24, proved 24 March 1597/8, abstracted in Family History, I, April 1963, p. 123. His wife was Margaret Fisher." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"Family History, I, April 1963, p. 126" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"His father, George Maplesden, was the maternal uncle of her mother and his mother, Thomasina Fisher, was the daughter of Henry Fisher, her father’s first cousin." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"Joseph Meadows Cowper, ed., Canterbury Marriage Licenses, 1st ser., 1568-1618 (Canterbury, 1892), p. 377" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 40.

"Robert Hovenden, ed., The Visitation of Kent, Taken in the Years 1619-1621 (Harleian Society, Publications, XLII; London, 1898), p. 157. No record of children by her (2) marriage has been found but a suit brought in Virginia by John Sloman, Gent., against John, Francis and Thomas Epes was ordered to be continued 3 Aug 1658 (Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, p. 150). By 3 Dec 1658 he was deceased for Capt. John Woodleife and Mr. George Potter were appointed to examine the differences between Capt. Robert Wynne for the estate of Mr. John Sloeman, deceased, and Mr. Francis Epes and Mr. Thomas Epes and report to the next court (ibid., p. 162). John Sloman had witnessed a bond from Thomas Nothway to Daniel Llewellin on 12 June 1655 (ibid., p. 95). On 8 June 1663 Capt. Robert Wynne was granted a certificate for 600 acres establishing the importation of John Sloman twice (ibid., p. 384). This John Sloman may be the husband of Katherine (Epes) Maplesden Sloman, although since a Katherine Sloman married a Samuel Tilden on 14 Nov 1639 at Ashford (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, International Genealogical Index, microfiche, Kent, England), Katherine’s husband may have died before 1639 and the John mentioned in Virginia records in the 1650s may instead be a son. The relationship, if any, has not been confirmed by research to date." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 40-43.

"St. Martin’s Church, Detling, Bishop’s Transcripts" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 43.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent, reported by William R. Epes, Devon, Pa., July 1971" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 43.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Bishop’s Transcripts, reported by Stella Colwell, Oct 1977" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 43.

"Cowper, op. cit., 2nd ser., 1619-1660 (Canterbury, 1894), p. 253. Edward Hudson, of Stanton-on-Arrow, Co. Hereford, gent., bachelor, about 25, son of Rowland Hudson, same place, gent., who hath given his consent thereunto by Letters under his hand to the father of Ann Epps with whom he intendeth to marry as he verilie believeth, and alleageth that mayden of the age of 22 yeares, that he intendeth to marry with said Ann Epps, the daughter of John Epps, of Ashford, gent., who consents. At Westwell. John Sloman of Ashford, bondsman, Allegation made and signed by Edw. Hodson." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 43.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent; Bishop’s Transcripts, report of Reginald Glencross, London, June 1940" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent; Bishop’s Transcripts, report of Reginald Glencross, London, June 1940" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent, Bishop’s Transcripts, cited in Eva Turner Clark, Francis Epes, His Ancestors and Descendants (New York, 1942), p. 29" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Robert Hovenden, ed., The Visitation of Kent, Taken in the Years 1619-1621 (Harleian Society, Publications, XLII, London, 1898), p. 83. The Ropers were, from about 1370, owners of Dean Manor in Brenzett and Ivychurch parishes (Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, VIII [2nd ed.; Canterbury, 1797, reprint 1972], p. 391). Both Hasted, op. cit., 1st ed., II (Canterbury, 1782), p. 391, and Arthur Collins, The Peerage of England, VI (London, 1768), p. 624, give his mother’s surname as le Bourn." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Collins, op. cit., VI, pp. 623-24; Hasted, op. cit., IV, p. 40" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Register of St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent, reported by William R. Epes, Devon, Pa., July 1971; Bishop’s Transcripts, reported by Reginald Glencross, London, June 1940" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Minutes of the Council and General Court, pp. 138-39" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Hotten, op. cit., p. 188. He was mentioned, 5 Feb 1626/7, in a deposition regarding events at Capt. John Ward’s plantation before and after the massacre (Minutes of the Council and General Court, p. 139). — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 44.

"Although nothing is known of further descendants of John Epes in Ashford, Kent, a note in the Encyclopedia Britannica (11th ed.; New York, 1910), IX, p. 708, states: ‘EPPS, the name of an English family, well known in commerce and medicene. In the second half of the 18th century they had been settled near Ashford, Kent, for some generations, claiming descent from an equerry of Charles II, but were reduced in circumstances, when JOHN EPPS rose to prosperity as a provision merchant in London, and restored the family fortunes. He had four sons, of whom JOHN EPPS (1805-1869), GEORGE NAPOLEON EPPS (1815-1874) and JAMES EPPS (1821-1907) were notable men of their day, the two former as prominent doctors who were ardent converts to homeopathy, and James as a homoeopathic chemist and the founder of the great cocoa business associated with his name. Among Dr. G. N. Epps’s children were Dr. Washington Epps, a well-known homoeopathist, Lady Alma-Tadema and Mrs. Edmund Gosse.’ The Dictionary of National Biography includes accounts of John Epps (I [London, 1937], pp. 800-01), his half-brother George Napoleon Epps (ibid., p. 799), and the latter’s sons-in-law Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, husband of Laura Teresa Epps (ibid., 1912-1921 [London, 1927], pp. 4-6), and Sir Edmund William Gosse, husband of Ellen Epps (ibid., 1922-1930 [London, 1937], pp. 353-55)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 45.

"Parish Register, St. Mary the Virgin, Ashford, Kent" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"He is not in the List of the Living and Dead of Feb 1623/4 or in the Muster of Feb 1624/5, but both lists are known to be incomplete. Eva Turner Clark, Francis Epes, His Ancestors and Descendants (New York, 1942), p. 211, repeats a tradition that Francis came on the ship Hopewell and later gave that name to his plantation on the south side of James River. A Hopewell, of 60 tons, brought passengers to Virginia in May 1622 and Nov 1623, and another ship, Great Hopewell, of 120 tons, arrived in May or June 1624 (Avery E. Kolb, ‘Early Passengers to Virginia; When Did They Really Arrive?’, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, LXXXVIII, p. 409), but no passenger lists are preserved. If Francis Epes came in 1622, he and his brother Peter may have come together. It would seem that Francis and Peter followed their elder brother William to the New World, perhaps influenced by William’s reports of his new home." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1619-1658/9 (Richmond, 1915), pp. Ix, 44; Cynthia Miller Leonard, comp., The General Assembly of Virginia, July 30, 1619 - January 11, 1978, A Bicentennial Register of Members (Richmond, 1978), p. 6." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia (2nd ed.; Richmond, 1979), p. 88" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"Minutes of the Council and General Court of Virginia (2nd ed.; Richmond, 1979), p. 151" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"Leonard, op. cit., p. 7" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"Minutes of the Council and General Court, p. 143" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 101.

"W. Bruce Bannerman, ed., The Registers of St. Olave, Hart Street, London, 1563-1700 (Harleian Society, Registers, XLVI; London, 1916), p. 40" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"Journals of the House of Burgesses … 1619-1658/9, pp. Xii, 56; Leonard, op. cit., p. 10" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"Patent Bk. 1, p. 280> This is the present site of the city of Hopewell, formerly called City Point" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"Muster, in John Frederick Dorman, ed., Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5 (3rd ed.; Richmond, 1987), p. 68" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

Information on Francis Epes I (1597-1674) Family Group Sheet provided by Sandra Ellerbe Krutilek of Pacific Palisades, Calif, in private correspondence dated 14 December 1995.

"Papers relating to the Virginia Company, Governor Harvey, Lord Baltimore, Maryland, New Albion, and petitions of the Virginia planters, Bankes Mss. 8, Bodleian Library, Oxford University, Virginia Colonial Records Project microfilm 636. Although undated, this list apparently was drawn up during the controversy surrounding Governor Harvey’s administration, circa 1635." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"Journals of the House of Burgesses … 1619-1658/9, pp. xv, xviii; Leonard, op. cit., pp. 18, 24." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, IX, p. 181" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 102.

"William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1st ser., IV, p. 152. Capt. Pawlett was evidently close to the Epes family as shown in the associations of 1626 and 1627 mentioned above. Godson Francis Epes was then aged about 15 and William Farrar was about 17; it would be interesting to know how the seemingly complicated division was accomplished." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Patent Bk. 1, p. 787; Patent Bk. 2, p. 12" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Journals of the House of Burgesses … 1619-1658/9, p. 82; The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, LXXXIII, p. 28" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Patent Bk. 3, p. 217" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Patent Bk. 5, p. 341 (349)" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 203" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 103.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 62" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 103-104.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 62. Since his younger brothers are known to have been born about 1628 and in 1630, and since his eldest son was born in 1646, his birth date about 1626 is a reasonable assumption." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1687-95, p. 209. She was not yet born by Jan 1624/5 when her parents were named in the muster, her father having come to Virginia in the George, 1619, and her mother in the Tyger, 1621 (Muster, in John Frederick Dorman, ed., Adventurers of Purse and Person, Virginia, 1607-1624/5 [3rd ed.; Richmond, 1987], p. 22). Humphrey Kent, aged 5, son of John Kent, merchant tailor, was on 18 March 1607 admitted to Christ’s Hospital [School], London, from the Parish of St. Sepulchre and on 17 Oct 1617 was dismissed to go to his mother in Virginia (Peter Wilson Coldham, Child Apprentices in America from Christ’s Hospital, London, 1617-1778 [Baltimore, 1990], p. 11). The identify of his mother, who presumably had remarried and was in Virginia with a second husband, has not been established." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 176" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 174" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, pp. 284-88" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 350; Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1672-74, p. 527" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1659/60-1693 (Richmond, 1914), p. 19" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 62" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 105.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 210" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

"C.O. 1/40, p. 191, Public Record Office, London, in John Davenport Neville, Bacon’s Rebellion, Abstracts of Materials in the Colonial Records Project (n.p., 1976), pp. 74-75; Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 176" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, p. 1" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 228" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 395" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 410. John3 was, however, referred to as executor of his father’s will, 25 May 1680 (Surry Co. Wills, Deeds &c 1671-84, p. 261). That John2 Epes left a will is confirmed by the certificate granted to John3 on 3 April 1689 stating that John3 was the reputed son of Coll. John Epes and Mary Epes, his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Kent, and that John3 proved his father’s will in Charles City County Court as executor and son and heir (Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1687-95, p. 209). The will probably divided the 1674 patent for 2550 acres granted to John2 among his sons since the acreage held by Johne, William, Edward and Daniel in 1704 equals the 1980 acres originally patented by Francis Epes in 1635 and 1653; the additional 570 [572] acres added in 1674 has not been accounted for." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 106.

Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 101-104.

"W. Bruce Bannerman, ed., The Registers of St. Olave, Hart Street, London, 1563-1700 (Harleian Society, Registers, XLVI; London, 1916), p. 40. He deposed, 4 Feb 1665/6, that he was 35 years old (Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, p. 633)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, p. 71" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, p. 150" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1672-74, p. 533" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 184" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 391" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 110.

Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 109-110.

Boddie, Mrs. John Bennett, Historical Southern Families, pp. 81-82.

"W. A. Crozier: ‘Virginia Heraldica,’ p. 91" — Americana, Vol. XXXVI, Jan 1942 - Dec 1942, p. 689.

"Bardsley: ‘Dictionary or English and Welsh Surnames’" — Americana, Vol. XXXVI, Jan 1942 - Dec 1942, p. 689.

"‘Register of St. Olave Church,’ London, 1563-1700, p. 40, in ‘Harleian Society Publications,’ No. XL" — Americana, Vol. XXXVI, Jan 1942 - Dec 1942, p. 690.

"‘Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,’ Vol. II, pp. 281, 393-94. Pauline M. Jones and K. P. Jones: ‘Genealogy of the Harris and Allied Families,’ p. 3. ‘Register of St. Olave Church,’ London, 1563-1700, p. 40, in ‘Harleian Society Publications,’ No. XL. ‘William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine,’ Vol. V, pp. 142-143." — Americana, Vol. XXXVI, Jan 1942 - Dec 1942, p. 689-691.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1676-79, p. 200; Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 56" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1655-65, pp. 137, 233" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1677-92, pp. 260-61. On 1 April 1679 Richard Kennon acknowledged the receipt of this bond from Fra. Epes, administrator of Col. Fra. Epes. He was to receive the money in England and pay it to the administrator." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p 287" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Ambler Mss., no. 14, Library of Congress" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Cynthia Miller Leonard, comp., The General Assembly of Virginia, July 30, 1619-January 11, 1978, A Bicentennial Register of Members (Richmond, 1978), p. 38" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Patent Bk. 6, p. 480" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large … of Virginia, II (New York, 1823), p. 330" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 2. They were his step-children." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 107.

"Court of Chancery, Country Depositions, Series II, 1649-1714, Css/229/16, British Public Record Office. A deposition of Colonel Francis Epps of Henrico County, James River, aged 49, is stated to have been taken at James City, 2 July 1679. The year must be 1677 since Francis Epes was 49 in that year and was dead in 1679." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Coventry Papers, LXVIII, fol. 293-94, Virginia State Archives Miscellaneous film 431" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 64" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 65" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Peter Wilson Coldham, American Wills & Administrations in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 1610-1857 (Baltimore, 1989), p. 102" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"It has often been suggested that her maiden name was Littlebury but no evidence of this has been found." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, pp. 59-60" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Henrico Co. Deeds &c 1697-1704, p. 274" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1688-97, p. 664" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 108.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1694-1701, p. 149" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 109.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills, 1688-97, p. 220" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills, 1688-97, p. 212" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 185; Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 315" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 372" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 16" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1st ser., VII, p. 160" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Cynthia Miller Leonard, comp., The General Assembly of Virginia, July 30, 1610 - January 11, 1978, A Bicentennial Register of Members (Richmond, 1978), pp. 50, 53, 62, 64" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, II (Richmond, 1927), p. 46; III (Richmond, 1928), pp. 243, 272. On 1 April 1707 Lt. Col. Francis Epes was one of three justices recommended by the court as fit and able persons to be appointed sheriff (Calendar of Virginia State Papers, I [Richmond, 1875], p. 112)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 116.

"Patent Bk. 9, p. 380" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 116-117.

"Patent Bk. 9, p. 540. Many of the headrights used in this patent, including his own name, were named in a certificate granted to Mr. Francis Epes 1 Feb 1687/8 (Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 262)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XXVIII, pp. 331, 221" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, III (Richmond, 1928), p. 275" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1710-14, p. 17" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, III, p. 311" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large … of Virginia, VIII (Richmond, 1821), p. 450, Act breaking the entail on ‘Longfield’ in Henrico County" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Henrico Co. Minute Bk. 1719-24, p. 34" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Henrico Co. Minute Bk. 1719-24, p. 14" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 117.

"Randolph pedigree, 1714/5, Collection of Robert Dale, Richmond Herald, College of Arms, H.Ms.21 f. 248, in Sir Gyles Isham, Pepys’ American Dinner Party (reprinted from Northamptonshire Past and Present, III-IV; Kettering, 1966), pp. 14-15. Although the parentage of Katherine Banks is presently unknown, this pedigree described her as daughter of ____ Banks of [Canterbury] in Kent. She was probably related to the brothers Caleb Banks who married Margaret Fisher and John Banks who married Mary Fisher, sisters of Thomazin (Fisher) Epes, the mother of Francis1 Epes." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 117-118.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 59; Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 211" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 118.

"Henrico Co. Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 211" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 119.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk 1678-93, p. 148" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 119.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1687-95, pp. 423-24" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 119.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1687-95, p. 499" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 119.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, II, pp. 9-10" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 119.

"Patent Bk. 9, p. 380" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 119-120.

"The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XXVIII, p. 330" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, III, p. 243. Mr. Willm Epes, Jnr., was one of three justices recommended by the court 14 April 1708 (Calendar of Virginia State Papers, I, p. 122)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"Wright and Tinling, op. cit., p. 260" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"Prince George Co. Order Bk. 1714-20, pp. 4, 10-11, 21, 34, 49, 78, 105, 233" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"Prince George Co. Order Bk. 1714-20, p. 249. She was also named in the accounting of the estate of Edward Goodrich which was returned 12 Jan 1724/5 (Prince George Co. Wills & Deeds 1713-28, p. 778) and although not necessarily alive then, presumably was living at some time subsequent to 10 Jan 1720/1 when Goodrich’s will was admitted to probate (ibid., p. 436)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"Prince George Co. Deeds & Wills 1713-28, p. 750. This land was shown on the Surveyor’s books as surveyed for John and William Epes, sons of William, deceased, 1 May 1712 (Prince George Co. Surveyor’s Bk. 1711-24, pp. 81-82 [107]), but on 6 May 1721 the petition John4 Epes and Josham [sic] Epes for a patent for 538 acres on Gravelly Run was granted by the Council, it being satisfied of the ability of the petitioners to cultivate the land (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, III, p. 548), and a patent to John4 and Isham4 was issued 13 Nov 1721 (Patent Bk. 11, p. 65)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 120.

"This date is estimated from the known age of his brother William and the birth of his sister Mary as estimated from the time of her marriage. He may have been somewhat younger, however, since it was not until 2 Sep 1695 that ‘Mr. Littlebury Epes the remaining orphan of Colo. Fra. Epes is ordered by this Court to come and discharge his Securities, he having as this Court are informed rec’d his estate’ (Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 38)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 121.

"Virginia State Archives, Acc. 27033. The provisions of the will make it clear that the other children of Littlebury Epes were not grandchildren of Daniel Llewellyn." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Henrico Co. Order Bk. 1678-93, p. 185; Deeds & Wills 1677-92, p. 315" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Louis des Cognets, English Duplicates of Lost Virginia Records (Princeton, 1958), pp. 9, 11. On 8 Feb 1705/6 a new commission for Charles City County was issued with directions Mr. Littlebury Epes be put in the place he held in the former commission (Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, III, p. 72). On 20 Oct 1714 the Council named him to receive the pair of scales and weights for Charles City County which had been ordered from England to prevent frauds in tobacco payments (ibid., p. 380)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"des Cognets, op. cit., p. 2; Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, II, p. 46" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Executive Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia, II, p. 296" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Leonard, op. cit., pp. 65, 67. His first election was reversed on contest by Thomas Parker but apparently he was elected to succeed Parker." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"des Cognets, op. cit., p. 22. On 2 Sep 1729 the Secretary of the Colony appointed Llewellin Epes as deputy clerk since ‘Littlebury Epes, Gent., Clerk of the Court of Charles City County is now very sick and weak and unable to attend the duties of his office’ (Charles City Co. Deeds, Wills, &c 1724/5-1731, p. 242" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Henrico Co. Orphans Court Bk. 1677-1739, p. 40; The Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, XXIII, no. 4, p. 48" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"Journal of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 1702/3-1705, 1705-1706, 1710-1712 (Richmond, 1912), pp. 244-46" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 122.

"The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, XXXI, p. 315; XXVIII, p. 320. The Prince George County land included his 333 ½ portion of a joint patent of 1000 acres, 24 Oct 1701, with his brothers Francis and William (Patent Bk 9, p. 380). Some time afterward, but before 10 Sep 1711, he acquired 500 acres, the moiety of a 1000 acre patent granted on 29 April 1692 to Rebecca Poythress (Prince George Co. Wills & Deeds 1710-13, pp. 70-71, 76-77, deeds of Charles Bartholomew and his wife Rebecca to their daughters Ann and Rebecca; see also Wills & Deeds 1713-28, p. 502, deed of Burwell Green and wife Ann and Francis Poythress to Robert Hunnicutt, 21 Dec 1721)." — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 123.

"William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 1st ser., III, p. 247" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 123.

"Charles City Co. Order Bk. 1737-51, p. 282" — Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, p. 123.

Dorman, John Frederick, Ancestors and Descendants of Francis Epes I of Virginia, pp. 107-109.

"Henrico Co., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 59 in record book; p. 28 stamped at top left corner of this transcript, LDS Reel No. 031769" — Park, p. 226.

"Beverley Fleet, abstractor, Virginia Colonial Abstracts, Charles City County, Court Orders 1664-1665, Vol. XIII (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1961; Preface signed by Beverley Fleet, Jan. 26, 1942) pp. 37 ff. in Fleet’s book; pp. 555-561 in Charles City County Court Orders. I, Clara Park, also read the original order book via microfilm from Virginia State Library, Reel No. 1 of Charles City County." — Park, p. 227.

"William Worsham, the young deponent who was ‘18 years or thereabouts,’ could have been younger than 18 years." — Park, p. 227.

"Fleet, Abstracts of Charles City Co., Vol. X, pp. 24, 27 in Fleet’s book; pp. 31, 37 in the original order book" — Park, p. 227.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 56 in original bk; p. 20 in transcription on film, LDS Reel 031769" — Park, p. 228.

"Colonel Francis Epes (d. 1678) had a son named Francis Epes (Jr.) who was a stepbrother of John Worsham, Charles Worsham, Mary Worsham, and Elizabeth Worsham." — Park, p. 228.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 4, Orphans Court 1677-1739, p. 2; LDS 031770" — Park, p. 228.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 56 in original book; p. 20 in this transcription in LDS Reel 031769. Francis Epes, son of the Colonel, later married Ann Isham, daughter of Katherine and Henry Isham." — Park, p. 228.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 59 in original book; p. 28 stamped at top left corner of LDS Reel 031769" — Park, p. 228.

"The date was Primo die October Anno Domini 1678 in Colonial Record Book 2, 1678-1693, p. 29, LDS Reel 031769" — Park, p. 229.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 1, p. 70, Reel 4, Va. State Library. Other presentments by Worsham were Joseph Royall being at cards on the Sabboth; Henry Lound drunk in my sight; John Stuart drunk three days together; Charles Featherstone drunk since he has been in the jury and swore several oaths in my hearing; Mary Farley not at church above three times within the twelve month." — Park, p. 229.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 65 in original book; p. 39 in this transcript on LDS Reel 031769" — Park, p. 229.

"Henrico Co., Va., Colonial Rec. Bk. 2, 1678-1693, p. 64 in original book; p. 37 in this transcript" — Park, p. 229.

Park, Clara Lorene (Cammack), Francis Moody (1769-1821), His Ancestors, Descendants, and Related Families, pp. 226-229.

Boddie, Mrs. John Bennett, Historical Southern Families, p. 82.

"Pauline M. Jones and K. P. Jones: ‘Genealogy of the Harris and Allied Families,’ p. 3. ‘Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,’ Vol. III, pp. 393-94. ‘William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine,’ Vol. V, pp. 142-43" — Americana, Vol. XXXVI, Jan 1942 - Dec 1942, p. 691.

Barnes, Robert, Genealogies of Virginia Families (The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography), Vol. II, pp. 710-711.

 


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