University of Minnesota

Online Grammar Handbook
   OnlineGrammar.org

             

                   

                                  

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Why OGH (Online Grammar Handbook) Works Well

                           

 

                                               

1. OGH can be faster than a web search.  OGH already has many of the best web sites for what you need.  All of OGH is organized like a typical printed grammar handbook.  Just click on the chapter containing your need, and see top English web sites from the U.S., Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand.  Most web sites are at universities and colleges, some are professional sites, and the remainder belong to well trained and educated specialists.

2. Find general and specific information.  Whether you want something general or specific--and something brief or long--OGH often has it. 

3. OGH has videos.  See the "Video" section in each chapter for brief and long--intro or advanced--videos, audios, and slide shows on each chapter's subjects.

4. OGH  offers several levels of difficulty (or easiness).  Are you looking for introductory and intermediate-level college help?  OGH specializes in it.  Do you want really basic help--for quick review or first-time learning?  OGH has it in each chapter.  Are you an advanced college or graduate student?  Many chapters have links for you, too.

5. Some of the helpful pages to which it leads are deeply buried in their original sites.  It can be hard or nearly impossible to find them with ordinary web searches.  OGH has already done it for you.

6. It has samples and readings.  You can find 1000s of sample papers, argumentative readings, reference books, and works of literature through OGH's links.  For sample papers, see chapters 12., 16., 20., & 21.

                       

                                

  

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Editor: Richard Jewell, Inver Hills College, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU)   

Originally published by the Univ. of Minnesota English Department's Composition Program Web Site.

First date of publication: January 1, 2001.  This edition: August 1, 2012.  Most recent updates in this page: August 1, 2013

URL: http://www.umn.edu/home/jewel001/grammar.  Also available at www.onlinegrammar.org
         

Editor

To contact the author, go to Contact Richard Jewell.  
Requests, reports of broken links, and suggestions are welcome.

                                                    

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The views and opinions expressed in this page are strictly those of the page author.
The contents of this page have not been reviewed or approved by the University of Minnesota.