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 Writing forCollege.org

  

Inver Hills Community College

 

Home & Contents                       Basics                       College Writing                       www.OnlineGrammar.org

                  

                                   

PARTS & SECTIONS

Click on any  part or section below:

Part I. Basics/Process

  A. Chapters 1-6: Start

  B. Ch. 7-13: Organize

  C. Ch. 14-20: Revise/Edit

Part II. College Writing

   D. Ch. 21-23: What Is It?

   E. Ch. 24-30: Write on Rdgs.

   F. Ch.31-35: Arguments

  G. Ch. 36-42: Research

  H. Ch. 43-48: Literature

   I.  Ch. 49-58: Majors & Work

Part III. Grammar 

   www.OnlineGrammar.org
 
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 Study Questions
     

 

                                                             

Chapter 37: The Research Process

                 
What are the steps in the research process?

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Introduction

This chapter defines and describes an interdisciplinary approach to college research and the steps of the research process in short and long versions.  These materials were developed by the "Research across Disciplines" ("RAD") Committee at Inver Hills College in the southeast metro area of St. Paul, Minnesota.  Students reading this textbook can use these steps to see how to conduct their own research.  Students also can see from these materials that research is a common concern for all college faculty with goals in common, and a common set of steps.

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Definition of Undergraduate Research for Faculty
by the Inver Hills College RAD Committee
(1-12)

Undergraduate research begins with the commitment of faculty to promote a culture of inquiry within the fine arts, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and applied and professional programs.  By modeling such a culture, faculty help students comprehend more deeply the principles of study and applications of practice in their respective disciplines.  Faculty also engage students to explore relevant problems, test these problems with the methods appropriate to the disciplines, and share findings with others.

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The Process of Research

by the Inver Hills College RAD Committee
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Short Version, Student-Oriented Process of Research (5-'12)

This process applies to research papers, poster and web presentations, speeches, et al.

1.   Develop interesting ideas and examine models of finished projects with your instructor.

2.   Plan with your instructor how to proceed with your research.

3.   Research!

4.   Show a first draft of the final project to your instructor.

5.   Make changes according to feedback.

6.   Produce a completed version of your project.

             
Long Version, Student-Oriented Process of Research (5-'12)

This process applies to research papers, poster and web presentations, speeches, et al. In addition to showing the basic steps for the development of a paper or other project, it articulates the overall classroom and homework events that should occur along the way. Here are the steps:
      

1.   Read and discuss with the instructor the research assignment broken down into steps and the due dates for the instructor to receive the result of each step.

2.   Read and discuss with the instructor the process itself and how success proceeds from working in a measured and systematic manner and avoiding the “all-nighter.”

BASIC PROCESS:
(Best Practices: Students show their instructor the results of each step for credit and, at instructor-chosen points, for simple or complex feedback.)

(a) initial reflection, development of ideas, and the selection of one

(b) a concrete proposal for the research project including the main idea, the proofs, and the resources

(c) a rough draft or sketch of ideas, proofs, and/or audio-visual materials, and a list of sources, all of it organized according to the requirements of the particular discipline.

(d) a nearly completed version that demonstrates the major disciplinary-appropriate organization of a beginning, middle sections, and an end with appropriate audio-visual elements; good micro-organization of unified, connected paragraphs and sentences and/or audio-visual components; and a bibliography accurate in all but small editing concerns

(e) a completed version that is well edited and professionally presented

3.   Read and discuss examples of research papers, their organizational patterns, and their style/tone/scholarly stance. If available, read and discuss examples of stages of the research process—from initial proposals and rough drafts through organization to final draft—by looking at examples written by previous students. 

4.   Review with the teacher and/or librarians discipline-specific information about locating appropriate sources and using them effectively.

5.   Brainstorm ideas; then choose the best one according to your interests and the resources available. Working with a teacher, tutor, and/or librarian often is helpful in this process.  Present your idea as a rough-draft proposal to your instructor. Later polish and present the proposal in the form required by the instructor.

6.   From this proposal, develop a first draft or sketch of ideas, proofs, and/or audio-visual materials, and a list of sources, all of it roughly organized in the pattern appropriate to the discipline.  This rough draft should usually be at least half the length of the final project.  Present this rough draft to the instructor and/or share it with a peer group for additional suggestions.

7.   Using any comments received in the previous step, develop an almost completed version that demonstrates the major disciplinary-appropriate organization of a beginning, middle sections, and end with appropriate audio-visual aids; good micro-organization of unified, connected paragraphs and sentences and/or audio-visual components; and a bibliography accurate in all but smaller editing concerns.  Present it to the instructor and/or share it with a peer group for additional suggestions.  If sentence, paragraph, or audio-visual flow is a problem, work with a tutor.

8.   Produce a completed version that is well edited and professionally presented.  Get help from a peer group or tutor for final polishing.  Then present it to your instructor for a grade and/or for suggestions for an additional suggestions.

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Return to top.

 

                 

    

         

G. RESEARCH

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Chapters:

 36. What Is "Research"?

 37. Research Process

 38. Choosing Resources

 39. Developing the Paper

 40. Quoting/Paraphrasing

 41. Avoiding Plagiarism

 42. Critical Thinking

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Activities

MLA Ppr. Examples:
   Analyses
   Dialogic Args.
   Thesis Args.

APA Ppr. Examples:
   Case Studies
   Mag. Article

                    

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 Related Links in
OnlineGrammar.org:

  Examples of Several
  Bibliography Styles

  12. Types of Papers

  13. ESL/NNS/TESOL

  14. Online Readings

  16. Research Writing

  17. Citation & Documentation

  18. References & Resources

  19. Visual/Multimodal Design

  20. Major/Work Writing

 

Updated 1 Aug. 2013

  

   

 

WritingforCollege.org also is at CollegeWriting.info and WforC.org

Natural URL: www.tc.umn.edu/~jewel001/CollegeWriting/home.htm
Previous editions: Writing for School & Work, 1984-1998; CollegeWriting.info, 1998-2012
6th Edition: 8-1-12, rev. 8-1-13.  Text, design, and photos copyright 2002-12 by R. Jewell or as noted
Permission is hereby granted for nonprofit educational copying and use without a written request.
Images courtesy of Barry's Clip Art, Clip Art Warehouse, The Clip Art Universe, Clipart Collection, MS Clip Art Gallery and Design Gallery Live, School Discovery, and Web Clip Art
Click here to contact the author: Richard Jewell.  Questions and suggestions are welcome.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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