Simulation Software


Sampling SIM: This program allows the student to explore the nature of sampling distributions of sample means and sample proportions. The software provides separate windows for building population distributions, drawing and viewing random samples from the population, exploring the behavior of sampling distributions of sample means, and exploring the behavior of confidence intervals. The software is written for the Apple Macintosh computer and will work on 68040 machines and higher (PowerPC, G3, and G4). A Windows version is also available that works with Windows 95 and higher.

Sampling SIM is used in the following activities:

Apple Macintosh Operating System (version updated 1/19/01)

Requires Stuffit Expander; download free copy at http://www.stuffit.com/mac/expander/

    In Safari:
  • Right click (or Ctrl-click) the Sampling SIM.sitx link below
  • Select "Save linked file to the desktop"
  • From the desktop, drag the Sampling SIM.sitx.txt file onto Stuffit Expander
In Explorer:
  • Right click (or Ctrl-click) the Sampling SIM.sitx link below
  • Select "Download link to disk "
  • Select a location and click the SAVE button
  • From the desktop, drag the Sampling SIM.sitx file onto Stuffit Expander
  •  Sampling SIM.sitx

     

    Microsoft Windows Operating System (version updated 10/16/02)

     Sampling SIM.zip (WinZip Archive; set application to WinZip)


    Standard Distributions: This program allows students to explore the characteristics of the standard normal distribution and Student's t-distribution. The software is written for the Apple Macintosh computer and will work on 68040 machines and higher. We are currently working on a Windows version of the software.

    Apple Macintosh Operating System

     To download this software, click one of the following:

     Standard Distributions.sea (Self-Extracting Archive; set application to Stuffit Expander)



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