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Contents of

Becoming More Authentic:

The Positive Side of Existentialism

by James Leonard Park


(Minneapolis, MN: Existential Books: www.existentialbooks.com, 2007—5th edition)
(Library of Congress call number: B105.A8P37 2007)
(ISBN: 978-0-89231-105-7)
(large format paperback (8.5" X 11")


    Becoming More Authentic is the first (and still the only) book
to give a systematic account of the concept of Authentic Existence
as defined in existential philosophy and psychology.

    In PART I, Authenticity is defined by 23 features,
which are explained in the course of the first two chapters.
These chapters also contain an Authenticity Test,
which is intended to enable the careful reader
to assess his or her present degree of Authenticity.

SELECTED QUESTIONS FROM THE AUTHENTICITY TEST

    PART II of the book explores
several possible Authentic projects-of-being.

    PART III presents Authenticity
as described by five different existential thinkers:
Camus, Sartre, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, & Maslow.



    The following items from Becoming More Authentic
are available on line.
Just click the parts you would be most interested in seeing.
These pages total about 25% of the book.

Copyright Page—Classification SUBJECTS for this book . 2

Introduction. 3

Authenticity Defined—Original Existence vs. Authentic Existence. 4



PART I A DEFINITION OF AUTHENTIC EXISTENCE
AND AN AUTHENTICITY TEST 7

Ch. 1 From Conformity to Autonomy 8

SELECTED QUESTIONS FROM THE AUTHENTICITY TEST

Ch. 2 Centering and Integrating 18



PART II AUTHENTIC PROJECTS-OF-BEING 28

Ch. 3 Creating An Authentic Project 29

I. Some Steps toward Developing an Authentic Project-of-Being. 29
A. Taking a Time-Inventory. 29
B. Beginning to Re-Design Our Lives. 30
C. Considering Several Possible Ultimate Concerns. 30
D. Keeping a Journal of Our Quest for Authenticity. 31
II. The Danger of Getting Lost in the Future. 31

III. The Danger of Conformity. 33

Ch. 4 My Authentic Project-of-Being 34

Ch. 5 Helping Children Grow Toward Authenticity 36

I. Alternative Parents. 37

II. An Authenticity School. 39

Ch. 6 Authenticity Counseling 40
I. How We Might Become Authenticity Counselors. 41

II. Some Problems to be Avoided or Overcome. 41

Ch. 7 Love Counseling 42
I. A Love Counseling Service. 42

II. Group Counseling. 43

III. Resource Center. 43

Ch. 8 Promoting Family Planning 44

Ch. 9 Liberation from Sex-Roles 46
I. Intellectual Liberation. 46

II. Support Groups. 47

III. Liberated Journalism. 48

Ch. 10 The Contemplative Life 49

Ch. 11 Companions for the Dying 50

Ch. 12 Working for the Right-to-Die 52

Ch. 13 Other Projects 55

Ch. 14 Authenticity and Occupation 57

I. Work as Normally Experienced in Our Culture. 57

II. Occupation as a Way to Actualize Authentic Projects. 58

III. Work as an Obstacles to Authentic Existence
        and the Option of Voluntary Poverty. 58



PART III FIVE VERSIONS OF AUTHENTIC EXISTENCE 60

Ch. 15 Albert Camus: Rebelling Against the Absurd 60

I. Three Dimensions of Authentic Existence according to Camus. 61
A. Scorn of the Gods—Rejection of Absolutes. 61
B. Hatred of Death. 63
C. Passion for Life. 64
II. Authentic Existence in Camus' Fiction. 65
A. The Stranger. 65
B. The Plague. 65
Ch. 16 Jean-Paul Sartre:
            Inventing Our Own Meanings in a Meaningless World 67
Bad Faith—Inauthenticity. 68
Ch. 17 Martin Heidegger:
            Confronting Existential Guilt and Death 70
I. Inauthenticity. 70

II. Awakening from our Lostness in the 'They' 70

A. Existential or Primordial Guilt. 72
B. Existential Anxiety or Angst. 74
C. Ontological Anxiety or Being-Towards-Death. 74
D. Our Quest for Wholeness. 75
III. Authenticity—Resoluteness. 76
A. Re-Possessing Our Selves. 76
B. Choosing Authentically. 77
C. Resoluteness. 78
Ch. 18 Søren Kierkegaard: Willing One Thing 79
I. Success is Not One Thing. 79

II. Getting Distracted by Extrinsic Rewards. 82

III. Acting from Fear of Disapproval. 83

IV. Self-Centered 'Authenticity'. 84

V. Half-Hearted Commitment—Lost in Busyness. 84

VI. Living as an Individual. 85

VII. Authenticity as Process, Not Conclusion. 87

VIII. Existential Christian Appendix. 89

Ch. 19 Abraham Maslow: Becoming Self-Actualizing 90
I. Are All my Deficiency-Needs Satisfied (or Transcended)? 90

II. Am I Pursuing a Meaning Beyond Myself? 92

III. Am I More Concerned with Being than with Seeming? 93

IV. Have I Moved from Conformity to Autonomy? 94

AUTHENTICITY BIBLIOGRAPHY 95


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BIBLIOGRAPHIC DETAILS:


AUTHOR: James Leonard Park
TITLE: Becoming More Authentic
SUBTITLE: The Positive Side of Existentialism
LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CALL NUMBER: B105.A8P37 2007)
NUMBER OF PAGES: 96
SIZE: 8-1/2 inches wide  X  11 inches high  X  1/4 inch thick.
PUBLISHER: Existential Books
PUBLISHER'S WEBSITE: http://www.existentialbooks.com
PUBLICATION DATE: 2007
5th edition; second printing 2010
BINDING: stapled
BINDING: comb
ISBN: 978-0-89231-105-7
WEBSITE FOR THIS BOOK: http://www.tc.umn.edu/~parkx032/AU.html
LIST PRICE: $35 US
WHOLESALE PRICE: $15
PDF: $5
plus additional costs for postage/handling and/or electronic payment


    Questions? Ask the author:
James Park: e-mail: parkx032@umn.edu



Find Becoming More Authentic in a library

    Becoming More Authentic: The Positive Side of Existentialism
can be found in more than 20 libraries.
Go to WorldCat.
Based on where you write from,
the WorldCat will find the copy closest to you.
Five editions have been published.
But even the older editions provide the same basic content.

    If your favorite library does not have a copy,
you can recommend that they get one,
either by normal purchasing
or by means of a gift from the publisher to libraries.


If you would like to read a
  short summary of Becoming More Authentic ,
click those blue words.


If you would like to attend a seminar
based on Becoming More Authentic, click
AUTHENTICITY CLASS .
This class also includes a distant-learner option.


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